Author: Jone De Roode Jauregui (Page 1 of 9)

Fairtrade Fortnight 2023 at King’s

This guest blog post was written by George Hill, Library Assistant (Frontline Services) in Libraries and Collections at King’s.


Someone smiling at the camera against a green jungle background and the fairtrade logo with the text "the future is fair"Every year the Fairtrade Foundation organises Fairtrade Fortnight. This celebration of all things fairtrade seeks to raise awareness around key issues like workers’ rights, sustainability, and climate action; alongside encouraging people to swap Fairtrade-certified products. It also offers an opportunity for introspection and reflection, offering a chance for sustainability advocates and organisers to reflect on the successes of the fairtrade movement whilst looking at where we can improve.

As part of this year’s Fairtrade Fortnight, King’s hosted a talk on Ethical and Fairtrade Consumption. Our two excellent speakers included Ruth Strange from Ethical Consumer – a multi-stakeholder co-operative consumer magazine – alongside Lisa Connellan from King’s Food. Each had the opportunity to share what their respective organisations have been doing to encourage more sustainable and equitable consumer behaviour, as well as discuss what the next steps for achieving a more sustainable future might be.

Ruth kicked off her talk with a quick explanation of the excellent work done by Ethical Consumer in the field of sustainability advocacy and consumer choice. She explained how the magazine, founded in 1989, aims to offer consumers a clear and accessible way to compare how equitable and sustainable different brands and products are. The magazine scores particular brands and products out of 20 for sustainability and then ranks them against alternatives. It also offers a range of interesting ‘deep dives’ into everything from palm oil to tea to travel booking companies – helping to raise consciousness around issues like worker exploitation and climate degradation.

The main body of Ruth’s talk was an explanation and evaluation of the work of Fairtrade International and the Fairtrade Foundation. She framed this talk around five key issues: the meaning of Fairtrade, the importance of Fairtrade, its limits, and the accessibility (or lack thereof) of Fairtrade products. We learned how Fairtrade certification helps give consumers the information they need to help foster better consumer habits, in turn helping small producers – especially those producing products that were traditionally colonial cash crops for the west – to gain inroads into markets traditionally dominated by extractive and exploitative business interests. We also learned how Fairtrade promotes producers who guarantee fair wages for their employees; promotes worker democracy through collective bargaining agreements and trade union rights; and protects their workforce through minimum health and safety standards.

As well as emphasising the importance of Fairtrade and the good work that the Fairtrade Foundation does, Ruth also addressed some of the limits of Fairtrade certification. This includes the ongoing fairtrade certification of products produced by companies implicated in human rights abuses, as well as the problem of the affordability of some Fairtrade products. She nonetheless identified fairtrade as the ‘best option for continuous improvement’ – reminding the audience that it is best to not let ‘the perfect be the enemy of the good’.

Next up was King’s Food Manager Lisa Connellan, who offered an insight into some of the progress King’s Food have been making in implementing sustainable practices, whilst building on their varied and delicious range of food.

First on the menu was a look into King’s increasingly varied range of plant-based food. We learned that 65% of all food offered at King’s 20 outlets is now plant-based, with vegetarian and vegan options now served as default. This includes all kinds of different items, including ice cream, pies, croissants, and vegan sausage rolls (which I highly recommend). The university also no longer serves beef, rarely serves lamb and only sources from farmers committed to high levels of environmental stewardship. The progress King’s has made in reducing the amount of meat and dairy served means the university is now listed as one of PETAs top 10 vegan unis. It has also been awarded 3/3 stars by the Sustainable Restaurant Association.

Lisa also outlined King’s ongoing commitment to ethically sourced ingredients and to using fairtrade certified products throughout the supply chain. This includes King’s continued promotion of Fairtrade products, experiments with ‘reverse menu engineering’, and diligence in looking for the best and most ethical suppliers.

Looking to the future, Lisa said that King’s has a lot of plans for the coming months and years to help build on the university’s commitment to sustainable and ethical practices. This includes working towards getting a three-star Fairtrade University Award, looking into carbon taxing on products, further collaborating with students and researchers specialising in sustainability, and working with King’s Fairtrade and Sustainable Food Steering Group on how to implement policy.

Special thanks to all the wonderful organisers who made the talk possible, and to the King’s Sustainability team for all the work they do in promoting this important topic.


Relevant links:

Student volunteering story: co-creating the KEATS Sustainability and Climate Module

This guest blog post was written by student and KEATS TakeAction team member Oliver Yu Hurst.


Hello! My name is Oliver Yu Hurst and I’m in the final year of my part-time MSc Climate Change: Environment, Science and Policy at King’s. I’m a Nature-lover, passionate about transdisciplinary approaches to tackling social, environmental and multispecies justice and sustainability issues.

I had loads of spare time during the summer holidays in my first year and wanted to use it wisely. I came across the Keats Sustainability and Climate pilot module via King’s Sustainability newsletter and will never regret enrolling on this fabulous module.

Why I loved volunteering? Aside from the engaging webinars and learning about topics that don’t receive much attention (e.g., digital sustainability and the multitude of stuff King’s is doing regarding sustainability), after completing the module, I gained the opportunity to volunteer with the Sustainability team on improving it for this academic year. Working with this very welcoming team and other students, I led on the What is Sustainability, Climate Crisis, and Social Sustainability sections, contributing at least 12,000 words of content. I also gained experience in creating podcasts and organising different in-person/online events to complement the module. It was a pleasure to apply what I’ve learnt so far at KCL and my BSc Geography with Business Management (Queen Mary University of London), to diversify perspectives of sustainability because this is often framed from a Western-anthropocentric worldview.

Why should you volunteer? Making the most of extra-curricular activities on offer at King’s is one of the best ways to expand your skill/experience-set, network, and ultimately make a difference that lasts. This opportunity (and I’m sure others) also helped me feel ‘closer’ to the university, meeting/working with the staff ‘behind the scenes’ – something which I think all students should get the chance to do.

Want to volunteer, but don’t know how? Sign up to the Sustainability newsletter; browse King’s Volunteering, King’s Edge, and KCL Student Union websites; and ask classmates, teaching and/or professional services staff!


Want to learn more? You can enrol on the KEATS Sustainability & Climate module here and gain a Sustainability Award by completing it before the 8th of June.

Energy from Waste Tour: A Visit to Riverside Resource Recovery Plant in Belvedere, East London

This guest blog post was written by Hermione Dadone, Events Officer in the Fundraising & Supporter Development Office at King’s.


On a crisp November morning, a group of King’s College London staff and students set off for a tour of the Riverside Resource Recovery plant in Belvedere, East London. The visit was organised by Energy from Waste, a student-led group dedicated to promoting sustainable waste management practices and raising awareness of the importance of waste reduction and recycling. The group was told ‘just follow the big chimney’ and sure enough, it wasn’t too difficult to find our way, as a very tall silver chimney soon loomed in the distance as we walked from the station.

The Riverside Resource Recovery plant, commissioned in 2011 and opened in 2012, is an innovative facility that uses advanced technology to convert non-recyclable waste into electricity and heat. The plant collects waste from 90 vehicles across London and processes 850,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste per year, producing enough energy to power 180,000 homes. The plant operates Monday to Friday, with 200 container boxes unloaded every single weekday.

The tour started with a brief presentation on the history of the plant and the technology behind it. The group then donned high-visibility vests and hard hats before being taken on a guided tour of the facility by a member of Cory Group. The first stop was a view of the barge pier. Waste is transported to the plant via river barges, pulled by tug boats which run on vegetable oil, and can carry 60 containers at a time, equivalent to 22 lorries. The group watched a barge being unloaded and its yellow box cargo being brought up the pier runway via specially designed waste trucks. Next stop is the tipping hall, where the waste trucks tip their loads directly into the waste bunker from an 18-meter height, where the waste is stored before being fed into the furnace. In the waste bunker a colossal-sized round crane, like something out of War of the Worlds, is used push waste to the back of the bunker. There is an oxidizer system that sprays perfume to neutralize odours, and infrared cameras scan the waste to detect any hotspots and manage fire risk. If a hotspot is detected as reaching 60 degrees then the waste hotspot is picked up with the crane and removed straight into the fire chamber. If temperature in the waste bunker ever rises dangerously high then it is instantly cooled by water cannons that come on automatically if the temperature reaches 100 degrees.

The plant also has a system to deal with contamination in the waste. Waste inspections are carried out to identify and correct any contamination, and charcoal is used as a neutraliser for heavy metals, while lime is added to neutralise acids. The lime comes from Lancashire. The group learned that it is four times more expensive to process ‘dirty’ waste eg metals and other materials that shouldn’t be in general waste.

The heart of the plant is the energy recovery facility, where the waste is burned at high temperatures to produce steam. The steam is then used to power turbines, which generate electricity that is fed into the national grid. The biggest challenge for the plant is feeding the waste to keep the fire burning at a consistent level, which is directly affected by weather and how much moisture the waste contains.

Once the waste material has been burned, the plant recovers metals from the ash, which are then recycled for use in construction and other industries. The ash itself is used in making breezeblocks, capping for landfill, or in tarmac for roads.

The group was impressed by the scale and efficiency of the operation, as well as the advanced air pollution control systems that minimise the environmental impact of the plant, turning APCR (Air Pollution Control Residues) material into calcium carbonate pellets.

After the tour, the group had a chance to ask questions and discuss the plant’s role in sustainable waste management. The group learned that an additional neighbouring facility is currently being built that will allow the plant to operate on weekends, and will have a box shape design so that solar panels can be installed. With the addition of this new facility, the plant’s capacity will increase to processing 1.5 million tonnes of waste per year, making it the largest in Europe.

The visit to the Riverside Resource Recovery plant was an eye-opening experience for the King’s College London staff and students. It highlighted the importance of sustainable waste management and the role that innovative technologies can play in reducing our environmental impact. Physically seeing all that waste piling up at such scale should certainly encourage us as a community to be conscious of reducing our waste and always remembering our reusable coffee cup!


Find out more about waste management at King’s here and in King’s Climate & Sustainability Action Plan

Student experience volunteering at the London Student Sustainability Conference 2023

This guest blog post was written by Elisabeth Möhlenkamp, first-year English Law and German Law student at King’s College London and volunteer at LSSC23.


LSSC23 student volunteers from various universities.

This year’s annual London Student Sustainability Conference (LSSC) was a collaboration between ten of London’s universities, offering a space for student-led talks, workshops, conversations, and presentations centered around the UN Sustainable Development Goals. As one of many volunteers helping ensure the day ran smoothly, I was intrigued to see how the conference would effectuate convergence between the differing ideas and perspectives on sustainability.

I am a first-year English Law and German Law student at King’s College London, and up until my final year, where I can choose to specialize in a particular area of law, I do not think my course will cover climate justice and the law in any great depth (although I will have to see). z. However, I have a profound personal interest in climate justice (which was one of my main motivations to apply to law school in the first place). As a result, I aim to take advantage of as many opportunities as possible to engage with people who work in sustainability, who can teach me about new developments, who can demonstrate how sustainability is incorporated into various fields of study, research, and jobs. I volunteered at the LSSC conference to meet coordinators and students who shared my interest in climate justice and sustainability more broadly. I wanted to listen to the talks and projects that were presented, and also knew that it would be valuable to participate in a conference where everyone, despite their area of study, had an interest in how we can make the UN Sustainable Development Goals a reality.

I left the conference with a few general observations: Firstly, the featured projects were tailored to speak to people with varying degrees of knowledge. Some projects required basic prior knowledge in the respective field to fully understand the studies: One student presented innovative chemical manufacturing processes of an alternative material to plastic. Someone else had creatively designed a card game to indicate a food’s wastefulness, climate-friendliness, and seasonality to consumers. Thereby, sustainability was presented as a broadly applicable topic, from everyday life to specialized scientific research.

Secondly, the conference undoubtedly mirrored that Sustainability hits a nerve with each and every attendee, and it stimulates dedication and interest in an unparalleled fashion.

The closing event, which reunited attendees for a networking session, clarified that sustainability is near to people’s hearts: rarely have I observed and engaged in this many animated conversations, nor have I experienced proactivity and willingness to collaborate to this extent.

At the end, I noted that my perception of sustainability had changed. I find that in a university environment, sustainability as an idea is often closely connected to a certain career path rather than an end in itself: In an academic environment, sustainability is often mentioned in relation to ESG or Sustainable Finance. Surely, this phenomenon indicates increased awareness to the topic, but it causes loss of sight of all the issues that sustainability truly encompasses. Food Insecurity, socioeconomic status, physical and mental health issues, and the intersection of sustainability and humanitarian needs were discussed in the conference. The diversified content reinforced the need for interdisciplinary exchange to maintain an overall perspective.

I am sure speakers left the conference feeling buoyed by the unanimously positive feedback. Two students contently reported that attendees responded to their respective talks with inquisitive feedback and compliments on the exciting insights. Indeed, a successful event such as this acts as a propelling stimulation for those considering dedicating themselves to a sustainability-related project. To me, the conference meant newly acquired knowledge, exciting ideas, illuminating conversations, and several thrilling book recommendations, which all touch on sustainability, in all ways imaginable.

Elisabeth Möhlenkamp volunteered at LSSC on 20 February 2023. Whilst the conference has now taken place, you can still view the poster submissions for the event here. The conference will take place again in February 2024.

Join the final week of King’s Climate & Sustainability Month

King’s Climate & Sustainability Month offers you an opportunity to learn more about sustainability topics, collaborate and connect with others from across King’s, and take action on the climate crisis. Join the final week for a tree planting afternoon, a sustainability careers night, a climate action Q&A, a community mobilisation workshop, and more. Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and Twitter for updates.

Check out the events taking place this week:

Monday 27th 12-13 (Strand) Climate Change: What can we do? Join this student-activist-academic-led panel as part of the Associateship of King’s College (AKC).

 

15.30-16.30 (Waterloo) Stitch and Pitch: Volunteering Share your ideas, meet new people and learn about volunteering while honing your creative skills.

 

Various King’s Entrepreneurship Week – Day 1 Join an entrepreneurship hackathon, a workshop on how to build diverse teams, and a discussion about whether cities can be sustainable.

 

Tuesday 28th 12-13 (Online) Q&A with the Collective for Climate Action Find out more about this network of climate networks including 300 government organisations.

 

Various King’s Entrepreneurship Week – Day 2 Learn about how to spark disruptive ideas and gain insight into fast-paced innovation in health.

 

Wednesday 1st 15-16 (Online) Ethical and Fairtrade consumption What does Fairtrade mean? What are its limitations? How accessible are ethical choices?

 

17.30-20.30 (Guy’s) Stolen Climate: Global Perspectives of Fire on Earth Explore how we understand wildfires from their interaction with the Earth’s atmosphere to their relationship with colonialism.

 

Various King’s Entrepreneurship Week – Day 3 Find out how to develop entrepreneurial ideas using feedback and share yours in a speed mentoring session.

 

Thursday 2nd 12-13.30 (Online) Community organising & change-making

 

Join this workshop to hear about the power of community organising to change our societies.

 

16-18 (Strand) Engineering Microbial Biotech for Environmental Sustainability Learn about the role of the Sustainable Development Goals in microbial biotech.

 

18.30-20 (Residence) GradPlus: Climate & Sustainability careers Join the GradPlus team to discover careers related to climate & sustainability.

 

Various King’s Entrepreneurship Week – Day 4 Hear about the career journeys of three successful women and uncover disability bias in entrepreneurship.

 


Friday 3rd
12-14 (Honour Oak Park) Tree planting afternoon  Enjoy being outdoors and meet new people while helping us plant over 200 trees.

 

Various King’s Entrepreneurship Week – Day 5 Learn how to create an entrepreneurial CV and enjoy the week’s closing networking party.
All week Fairtrade Fortnight (27th of February – 12th of March) Choosing Fairtrade supports producers in protecting the future of some of our most-loved food and the planet.

 

King’s Climate & Sustainability Month: Week 4

King’s Climate & Sustainability Month offers you an opportunity to learn more about sustainability topics, collaborate and connect with others from across King’s, and take action on the climate crisis. Join the fourth week for an inter-university conference, to exorcise your climate anxieties through music, explore climate change via foreign policy and security, and more. Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and Twitter for updates.

Check out the events taking place this week:

Monday 20th 12-20 (Hybrid) London Student Sustainability Conference Join this conference to find out more about the student-led work that is inspiring positive impacts in the world.

 

Tuesday 21st 12.30-14 (Strand) The sound of the climate crisis Get loud with this gig theatre workshop which invites you to identify your climate anxieties and exorcise them through music in a safe and welcoming environment.

 

Wednesday 22nd 10-16 (Strand) Foreign Policy and Security Conference (22nd-24th) This conference provides a forum for practitioners and students to discuss together the challenges faced in the international arena, including climate change.

 

13.30-14.30 (Online) Make a difference – activism via email This event will give you the tools and support to demand better from your favourite brands – all through the power of an email.

 

14-16 (Waterloo) Plant with Pride: LGBTQ+ Gardening Event Meet new friends, sew seeds, paint pots and learn how to look after your plants with the Senior Gardener in the local community.

 

Thursday 23rd 9-17.30 (Strand) New Energy – a new approach to procurement and delivery? This event will explore current developments in the procurement of new and renewable energy projects, focusing both on the UK and internationally.

 

12-14.30 (Strand) Sustainable community lunch Join this lunch to connect with like-minded students and meet the King’s Sustainability team while enjoying vegan treats.

 

12-17.30 (Guy’s) Climate finance workshop Join this workshop to learn about pricing climate linkers, measuring climate transition risk, economic implications of short-term climate scenarios, and more.

 

16-17 (Online) Cross River Partnership: Empowering City Sustainability Join Cross River Partnership’s Conversation to explore how businesses can reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and be a force for positive change.

 


Friday 24th
11-12 (Online) Sustainability drop-in Join this online drop-in to ask the King’s Sustainability team any questions and discover how you can get involved with sustainability at King’s and beyond.

 

All week Various Biohackathon This hackathon aims to provide you with knowledge, skills, and experience to solve global problems with synthetic biology and entrepreneurship.

 

 

Living in King’s Residences? Then check out the various events coming up in celebration of King’s Climate & Sustainability Month.

King’s Climate & Sustainability Month: Week 3

King’s Climate & Sustainability Month offers you an opportunity to learn more about sustainability topics, collaborate and connect with others from across King’s, and take action on the climate crisis. Join the third week for interactive climate simulations, seed bomb making, mindfulness in nature, climate activism, and volunteering. Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and Twitter for updates.

Check out the events taking place this week:

Monday 13th
10.30-12 (Strand) King’s Climate Action Network Showcase Find out more about the King’s Climate Action Network while connecting over creative activities.

 

13.30-15 (Strand) Interactive climate simulator workshop Join this workshop exploring what climate interventions are needed to effectively mitigate climate change on a global scale, using the En-ROADS Climate Solutions Simulator.

 

Wednesday 15th
11-12 (Online) King’s Volunteering Webinar: Taking action by volunteering Find out how you can take action by volunteering, giving your time to support organisations driving positive change.

 

13-15 (Guy’s) Cycling in London Do a test bike ride with Swapfiets and find out more about their bike membership, connect with King’s Cycling Club, and learn more about cycling and bike maintenance.

 

14-15 (Guy’s) Mindfulness in nature Drop into your body, expand your awareness, and reconnect to nature through meditation, active listening, slacklining, dance and yoga.

 


Friday 17th
10-16 (Strand) SPACE – re-imagining space for sustainability Join this exhibition and showcase of live demos which explore the use of urban space for better sustainable living.

 

12.15-13.15 (Strand) Make your own seed bombs Learn about creating wildlife-friendly spaces and make your own seed bomb.

 

15.30-16.30 (Strand) An introduction to climate activism and youth governance Hear from the Youth Climate Ambassadors for Wales about how you can get involved in climate activism and how we achieve youth governance.

 

All week Student volunteering week (King’s Volunteering and KCLSU) A national week of action involving over 60 HE institutions featuring events and volunteering taster activities from a range of societies and charity partners.

Climate & Sustainability Month: Week 2

King’s Climate & Sustainability Month offers you an opportunity to learn more about sustainability topics, collaborate and connect with others from across King’s, and take action on the climate crisis. Join the second week to discover careers in sustainability, network, learn about air travel and making change abroad, and re-imagine space for sustainability. Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and Twitter for updates.

Check out the events taking place this week:

Monday 6th 6-7.15pm (Online) Discover Careers In: Sustainability Hear from industry professionals and alumni about their roles in the Sustainability sector and gather in-depth knowledge to assist your career search.

 

Tuesday 7th 12-12.45pm (Strand) Sustainability and Global Mobility – How you can make a change abroad Join the Global Mobility team to learn more about how you can be more sustainable when travelling to study or work abroad.

 

6-7.15pm (Online) Discover Careers In: Social Enterprise Hear from industry professionals and alumni about their roles in the Social Enterprise sector and gather in-depth knowledge to assist your career search.

 

Wednesday 8th 2-4pm (Strand) KBS sustainability essay competition workshop Join this workshop on doing research and evaluating research studies for undergraduate King’s Business School students to gain useful skills for the KBS sustainability essay competition.

 

3-5pm Leadership Masterclass – Introduction to Community Organising Join KCLSU for this introduction to the practice and tools of community organising, looking at how it can be used to build the power of communities to make change through collective action.

 

4.15-5.15pm (Hybrid) Air travel in academia: how sustainable is the academic system? Join this discussion to learn more about reducing the impact of air travel within & beyond academic systems.

 

6-8pm (Strand) CASCADE INQUIRY: Exploring hopeful climate futures Join this generative discussion introducing CASCADE INQUIRY, a new initiative by Superflux that imagines climate-positive futures.

 


Thursday 9th
2-3.15pm (Online) Discover Careers In: Renewable Energy & Sustainable Tech Hear from industry professionals and alumni about their roles in the Renewable Energy & Sustainable Tech sector and gather in-depth knowledge to assist your career search.

 

6-7.30pm (Strand) Climate & Sustainability Careers Networking Night Join this Networking Night to meet with employers who have sustainability opportunities as well as individuals keen to share their knowledge and experience working in this area.

 

Please note that the SPACE – re-imagining space for sustainability event that was due to take place on the 10th has been postponed to the 17th.

King’s Climate & Sustainability Action Plan is now live!

King’s Climate & Sustainability Action Plan, developed by the university’s Climate & Sustainability team in consultation with students, staff, alumni and members of King’s Climate Action Network (King’s CAN), has now been published. The action plan outlines 13 key impact areas to guide the university’s approach to sustainability and climate change, informed by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).

Key deliverables include:

  • At least a 50% reduction in carbon emissions by 2030, across energy use, business travel, our supply chain, commuting and waste
  • Ensuring sustainability and climate education is embedded into all King’s degree programmes by 2026
  • A four-fold increase in climate and sustainability research activity by 2029
  • Increasing investments with socially responsible benefits to 40% by 2025
  • Development of guidance on internal carbon pricing, to ensure we can better align financial decision-making criteria with King’s climate action goals

The publication of the action plan coincides with the start of King’s Climate & Sustainability Month which runs throughout February. It features ambitious targets to reduce emissions from our buildings so we can deliver the 40-50% reduction needed by 2030 to help limit global warming to 1.5°C.

The plan prioritises absolute reduction of carbon emissions over offsetting, which compensates for emissions by funding equivalent carbon dioxide savings elsewhere, and carbon removals, which includes natural strategies like tree restoration and agricultural soil management.

That is why we have now set a 2030 net zero target to give us more time to focus and invest in direct emissions reductions on our estate and in our operations.

Find out more here (or on the external page here).

Climate & Sustainability Month is here!

Climate & Sustainability Month offers you an opportunity to learn more about sustainability topics, collaborate and connect with others from across King’s and take action on the climate crisis. The month includes 30+ exciting events organised by King’s staff and students focused on one or more of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Subscribe to our newsletter to receive weekly updates throughout the month, and don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and Twitter for updates.

Check out the events taking place this week:

Monday 30th
3-4.30pm (online) The renewable energy transition seminar  How can we accelerate the renewable energy transition? What are the social and economic implications? Join this seminar to learn more.

 

5-7pm (Strand)

 

Love Your Clothes for Longer – Workshop

 

Love fashion but hate waste? Join KCLSU for this upcycling workshop to learn how to look after your clothes and some mending tips + tricks.

 

Tuesday 31st
11am-12pm (online) Behaviour change for sustainability – what is it & how to influence it  Join this event to get inspired about your power to effect real change and learn about the problems encountered while attempting to shift behaviour.

 


Thursday 2nd
9am-5.30pm (Guy’s) Education for the Anthropocene Join this 1.5-day workshop to gain a systemic view of climate science, explore policy solutions, and consider how to have effective climate conversations.

 

11am-3pm (Guy’s)

 

King’s Sustainability pop-up stall

 

Have a chat with the King’s Sustainability Team, ask questions, play games, hear about the latest projects, and have your say on sustainability at King’s.

 

1-2.30pm (Strand)

 

Uniting to address climate change through breath

 

Are you worried about our climate? Join this intimate group session to learn how to use the power of breath to charge your mind, body and spirit.

 


Friday 3rd
9am-12pm (Guy’s)

 

Education for the Anthropocene

 

Join this 1.5-day workshop to gain a systemic view of climate science, explore policy solutions, and consider how to have effective climate conversations.

 

11am-3pm (Denmark Hill) King’s Sustainability pop-up stall Have a chat with the King’s Sustainability Team, ask questions, play games, hear about the latest projects, and have your say on sustainability at King’s.

 

Calendar showing all events in February as part of sustainability month

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