Category Archives: Early Modern and Shakespeare

Conference Event: Practices of Collaboration in Early Modern Theatre

International Conference (online): 2nd – 4th December 2021

Practices of Collaboration in Early Modern Theatre: Authors, Actors, Printers, Playhouses, and Their Texts

This international conference takes into view the intricate interplay of numerous agents in the early modern dramatic arena: authors and their respective playing companies, actors, printers, and playhouses. 21 speakers from Australia, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, the UK, and the US will discuss a spectrum of collaborative practices between these various agents in the early modern dramatic arena. Situated at the intersection of literary studies, cultural studies, and early modern history, the conference aims to explore concepts of early modern collaboration and, consequently, of early modern authorship.

Keynote Speakers:

Lucy Munro (Professor of Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature, King’s College, London, https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/dr-lucy-munro ): Heminges and Condell and Shakespeare

Andy Kesson (University of Roehampton, London): “I was appointed to perform this work” (Aemelia Lanyer): What Is Early Modern Attribution?

Tiffany Stern (Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham): Product Placement in the Time of Shakespeare

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Shakespeare in the Royal Collection. Shakespeare’s Second Folio.

Sally Barnden, in conversation with Emma Stuart, explores Shakespeare’s Second Folio, which was in possession of Charles I during his imprisonment.

One of the most prized objects in the Royal Collection is a ‘Second Folio’ edition of Shakespeare’s plays, first published in 1632. It contains handwritten annotations made by the deposed King Charles I in the final days before his execution on the orders of Parliament, during the English Civil War.

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Reform, Rejection, and Renewal: Findings from the Shakespeare in the Royal Collection

By Kirsten Tambling and Sally Barnden

Dr Kirsten Tambling and Dr Sally Barnden, postdoctoral research associates on the AHRC-funded project ‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collection’, discuss their work and findings ahead of the launch of their online database and exhibition on the 15th of July.

Kirsten: In 2018, Cole Moreton wrote a piece for the ‘i’ on the ‘transformation’ of Prince Harry. Arguing that ‘Prince Harry’s transformation from wild child to hero is uncannily like that of Shakespeare’s warrior Hal’, Moreton traces the trajectory of the Prince of Wales’s second son from tearaway teenager – sent to rehab for smoking cannabis – to one of the royal family’s most popular members, alongside that of Prince Hal of Henry IV Parts 1 and 2.

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Bard Takes: A new podcast supported by KCL English Department

What do we really think about Shakespeare? As one of the world’s most iconic writers, we all have certain preconceptions and biases about him and his work which can impact how we watch, read and study them. The Bard Takes Podcast follows a Shakespeare Studies student exploring these preconceptions and the truth behind Shakespeare’s work, with guests including staff and students from King’s College London, Shakespeare’s Globe and beyond.

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