A Summer Adventure in History and Literature

If you are hungry for finding out about the past and if you have a fascination with language or the way that the stories we tell shape our culture, a History and Literature course may be perfect for you. If you still need some persuading, why not look at this list of reasons to study History and Literature:

1. Transferable skills
Studying History provides a student with skills which are not confined to the study of the past. On the other hand, whatever people may think about Literature, it isn’t just about reading books. This course will allow you to learn valuable analytical skills, and the ability to analyse and then prioritise information that is vital to decision making. This not only provides a skill set for a student, but it also keeps career options open.

2. It is relevant
There is a stigma attached to History that it is based entirely in the distant past, but this does not account for the huge amount of modern history which is studied in such depth. We can also use classical literature to understand and improve our history. Be it poetry, novels, plays or other literary works. In order to make sense of current affairs it is important to study the past, as everything which is happening around us has been influenced by, and is a direct result of, that which preceded it. In this way, the study of History and Literature is explicitly relevant to us.

3. It is an investment in your future
If studied, a degree in the subjects of History or Literature can be an impressive and attractive feature on a CV. The widespread demand for good communication skills means History and Literature degrees offer lots of potential career paths such as academic librarian, archaeologist, archivist, arts administrator, film director and much more!

The Pre-University Taster course in History and Literature is running from 6 – 9 August 2018, and is led by academics from the Faculty of Arts & Humanities. Students will explore lives, key themes and events connected to London from a historical and literary perspective. Alongside daily classes, students will have the chance to extend their learning beyond the classroom with a course excursion to a relevant archive or museum. The application deadline is 15 May 2018.

Kick-start your Future in Science and Technology

Science and Technology are closely linked aspects of society, and the developments in both of these fields are essential for the overall progress of humankind.

Science comprises a wide variety of fields ranging from chemistry to relatively advanced fields like space exploration, human genetics, and cloning. Scientific study attempts to explore and understand the physical world and tries to analyse the occurrences in nature and gain more knowledge through experimentation.

On the other hand, the importance of technology lies in its manifold benefits to society. The advancement in this field has revolutionised human life. It has provided an impetus to the computer and the telecommunication industry. The developments in communication technology have made the world a smaller place. The Internet serving as an excellent communication platform has made the world flat.

The Pre-University Summer School offers a course in Science and Technology to prepare students who are considering an undergraduate degree in science, engineering or related subjects. Led by academics from King’s Natural and Mathematical Sciences faculty, students will study fundamentals of chemistry, physics and engineering to build their theoretical and experimental understanding of each discipline in the modern world.

The programme will run from 9 to 20 July 2018 and the application deadline is 15 May 2018.

Undergraduate Summer School Modules in Maths and Engineering

Applications are now open for our Undergraduate Summer School in Maths and Engineering.

In Session One (2 – 20 July 2018) we will be running the Applied Maths: Understanding Engineering through Numbers module. This module is aimed at university students who are keen to improve and strengthen their knowledge of applied mathematics. The focus of this module will be on the application of mathematical methods to a variety of real-world problems from physics and mechanics. Previous mathematical and physics education will be expected. The course will be taught by Dr Jordi Alastruey-Arimon and Dr Peter Charlton from the Biomedical Engineering Department here at King’s.

Dr Peter Charlton explained his insight into the course: “The Applied Maths module provides an introduction to the mathematical techniques which are used to solve engineering problems. Students are given opportunity to put the techniques into practice by tackling real-world engineering problems, including a special focus on clinically-relevant problems in the field of biomedical engineering.”

In Session Two (23 July – 10 August 2018) you will have the opportunity to study Engineering: Creating Technologies that Help People. During this module you will engage in a project which aims to deliver a technical solutions to a challenging task, set by local community groups and NGOs working in sustainable development projects. You’ll learn how to undertake these projects, from the initial planning stages to the delivery of an appropriate sustainable solution, whilst learning to manage your time and resources. Dr Jamie Barras from the King’s Department of Informatics will be teaching this module. He has recently written an article about the module for our SummerTimes blog, which you can read here.

These modules are often taken for credit towards degrees at other institutions, and are examined to university standards. To receive credit for King’s summer classes, contact your home institution to ask them to award external credit.

You can submit an application for the Undergraduate Summer School now, and will have until 31 May 2018 to do so. If you have any questions about the programme please email us at summer@kcl.ac.uk. Alternatively, follow us on FacebookTwitter or Instagram for up to date information about the Summer Programmes Team.

 

King’s & Stemettes Inspiring A New Generation of Women in STEM

Summer Programmes is proud to announce a collaboration with Stemettes, an award-winning social enterprise focused on providing confidence, inspiration and guidance for young women looking to pursue subjects and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Female representation in STEM fields is low worldwide. In the UK, only 21% of the STEM workforce is female, and stereotypes about gender differences in STEM fields become entrenched in girls’ minds by the age of six.

To inspire girls in the UK and Ireland to dive into STEM, Stemettes was co-founded by Anne-Marie Imafidon in 2013, and since then over 17,000 girls have attended their events, and 95% of those girls have reported an increased interest in STEM fields thereafter. Although they’ve already had a significant impact in bringing more girls into STEM, they have aimed to reach two million more by 2025, and to see a STEM workforce with greater female representation.

Building on the Women in STEM initiative at King’s and our belief that girls and young women should be encouraged to pursue degrees and careers in STEM, we are delighted to be offering 10 tuition-fee scholarships this summer to enthusiastic and motivated students nominated through Stemettes. These students will ensure that 50% of our intake for the Engineering course is female. The course is part of our Pre-University Taster programme which is designed to prepare high school students for university life and offers a variety of subjects in addition to engineering such as law, politics, history and literature and science. It willrun from 6-9 August 2018 and applications will close end of May 2018.

For more information on Stemettes visit their webpage. In addition, further details about our Pre-University Taster can be found here.

Summer Education Abroad- Berlin

Berlin’s combo of glamour and grit is bound to mesmerise anyone keen to explore its vibrant culture, cutting-edge architecture and tangible history. It is the capital of Germany and one of the most celebrated and renowned cultural epicenters in Europe.

This course is designed for King’s students studying a range of different subject areas. Students will discover the city of Berlin and explore how citizenship shapes how cities and communities are built and rebuilt through history. By joining this highly interactive, skills and knowledge-building programme, they will be intellectually stimulated and personally empowered.

We will be running two sessions in consecutive weeks, with 25 places on each course:

  • Session 1: 11 – 15 June 2018
  • Session 2: 18 – 22 June 2018

Participation in this programme is fully funded as part of the commitment to King’s institutional strategy to support the brightest minds regardless of background. King’s will cover all course-related content, economy return flight to Berlin, any local travel related to the programme and affordable accommodation in the city centre. Please see here for further information about funding eligibility.

The study tour will use excursions, museum visits and discussions with Berliners to offer expert insight into both Berlin’s past and its present, enabling participants to profoundly experience this dynamic city whose future will influence the development of the Western world.

The course will be led for the second time by Aida Baghernejad. She explained her thoughts in the upcoming Summer Times blog; “This course introduces you to dynamic people who have taken their life and their destiny into their own hands. It’s all about personal agency and responsbility; about not only dreaming of a utopia, but actually just creating it yourself.”

The deadline for applications is midnight on Sunday 25th March 2018. Students can apply online here. Please see the webpage for further application guidance.

King’s Summer Scholarships

Given our partnership with UNHCR, King’s Summer Programmes is proud to be offering ten tuition fee scholarships to forced migrants from the UK and around the globe. These scholarships are for students wishing to study on any one of the following programmes: 2018 Undergraduate School, 2018 Pre-University Summer School, 2018 Pre-University Taster.

The term `forced migrant` is used as an umbrella term for the following immigration backgrounds:

  • Asylum seeker is someone who has lodged an application for protection on the basis of the Refugee Convention or Article 3 of the ECHR.
  • Refugee is a former asylum seeker person who has been granted refuge in a country other than their home country. They have been able to prove that if they are returned home, they will be prosecuted because of their race, religion, nationality, social group or political opinion.
  • Humanitarian Protection is given to people, if sent back, would face punishment due to a previously not mentioned case.
  • Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Child status is given in unique cases for children arriving to the country separated from their parents, for a limited period of time, usually until they turn 17.5.
  • Limited Leave to Remain (previously Discretionary Leave to Remain) is given for applicants with unique cases to remain in the UK for a limited period of time
  • Long Residence Status can be granted in case of demonstrating continuous residency in the UK for several years (sufficient length depends on age).

According to UNHCR statistics, only 1% of eligible refugees have access to higher education, compared to 36% of global youth. Higher education is a priority for UNHCR and forms an integral part of their protection and solutions mandate. The King’s Summer School is pleased to be involved in this partnership and welcome students to apply.

The deadline for this scholarship is 1 April 2018.  All scholarship applicants need to apply for the programme in the usual way and must fulfill our standard academic criteria. For information on how to apply for this scholarship please read the guidelines here. Good luck!

King’s Summer Weekends with The National Archives – Family History

King’s is working with some of the most prestigious British and international institutions to bring you King’s Summer Weekends for the intellectually curious. This stimulating and informative bite-size course is designed to fit around your personal and professional commitments.

Tracing your family tree and learning more about your ancestors has become a national passion, but many family historians soon find that internet research gives limited results, with simple lists of names and dates often being all that is available.

This course is for everyone who wants to expand their research into their family tree. It combines instruction on practical researching techniques with academic insight into how key historic events shape stories across generations. It is designed to help participants better read the information they discover, expand their investigation beyond the internet to include historical archives and guide them in their interpretation of details such as professions and social status to make their own journeys into their family’s history as rewarding and revealing as possible.

The registration deadline is  20 July 2018. For more information about the programme, please visit our webpage. Alternatively follow us on FacebookTwitter or Instagram for up to date information about the Summer Programmes Team.

 

 

 

King’s College London Obstetrics and Gynaecology Summer School

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During the long summer holiday following second year, I had a lot of free time to work with and I wanted to make the most of it, so I applied to the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Summer School. Part of this decision was that I wanted to start exploring what specialties I might consider pursuing later in my career but also because I was anxious about starting clinical medicine and wanted to face my fears head on. I’m glad I did because the programme was a gentle introduction to clinics. I really appreciated the chance to figure out how learn in the clinical environment without the pressure of assessment, sign offs and firm heads to answer to.

The best part of the programme by far was the student mentor I was assigned. Our student mentor was immensely helpful and went above and beyond to make sure we had a productive week. He was with us in clinics and surgeries, offered impromptu teaching sessions and when all these were saturated he even offered himself as a dummy to let us practise venepuncture. The words “role model” sound cliché but watching him confidently manoeuvre his way through the wards gave me the confidence to do the same and assert myself in the clinical environment. I think it’s really important to have role models in clinics and we often think of them as our consultants but the Summer School showed me I have just as much to learn from my near peers.

The course itself was intensive as it was just a week but pitched at just the right level for pre-clinical students. It covered a wide range of clinics; both nurse and consultant-led so we observed the roles played by every member of the team. It was also the first time I ever got to see surgery, which was really exciting. Most importantly, despite St Thomas being a big hospital, all the staff we met were friendly, approachable and eager to involve you wherever you went.

If I had to name just one thing I took away from this experience it is the gratitude I have to be a part of the medical profession. The summer school showed me that the trust patients place in their doctors and midwives is immense and I felt privileged to be present at moments as life changing as childbirth. The team at St Thomas’ were passionate and committed to every one of their patients, no matter how big or small the case. To that end, the Summer School has left me with lessons I will carry with me forever in both my professional and personal life.

 

Art of Leadership: ‘Leaders aren’t born; they are made’

Leaders aren’t born; they are made. The Art of Leadership provided students with an exciting, hands-on approach to leading. It interactively engaged students to develop their leadership potential with innovative lessons and challenges.

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Team building exercise.

During lectures, the course explored core leadership concepts such as the distinction between leadership and authority, adaptive challenge/work, as well as transactional and transformational leadership. The most stimulating part, however, was applying critical leadership skills, including problem solving and decision-making, emotional intelligence, communication, and strategic action to real world situations. The students had to be prepared for challenges at any moment!

For instance, they were thrown into hot water and tasked to design and mobilize teams. They learned how to advance their interests strategically and to utilize networks. And they received a glimpse into manifold challenges and the dangers of leading.

The course focused on business leadership and beyond, drawing on case studies from politics, sports, the military, and the non-profit sector. Class interactions were also an integral and memorable part of the programme.

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R.H. John Gummer Lord Deben addressing the class.

These interactions often took the students outside the classroom. We visited the Churchill War Rooms and Britain’s retail giant Marks & Spencer. Moreover, we welcomed several guests to the course who openly shared their leadership experiences and passed on their wisdom of what has and hasn’t worked for them.

Leading consists of more than just delivering results. As such, we also allocated substantial time for students to reflect on their personal motivation, drives, abilities, and skills.

After three weeks in the course, the students agreed they were departing with useful skills for their academic and professional future and a clearer picture of how to lead. Furthermore, they were instilled with a better understanding about themselves and who they aspire to be.

Mark T. Fliegauf

Global Energy Politics

The course provides insights into international politics in general (main mechanisms, theories and concepts) and into the field of international energy politics in particular.  We will study a wide variety of actors involved in energy policy-making: states (energy importers, energy exporters and transit states), intergovernmental organisations, industry, NGOs; the formal and informal connections between these actors and the outcome of their interaction on the global stage. We will engage with issues such as energy security, the geopolitics of energy, conflict over natural resources, the curse of natural resources in resource rich developing countries, as well as the politics of climate change and their implications for global energy policy.

Renewable Energy Solar Panels in Tokelau; Copyright: United Nations Photo/ Ariane Rummery

Renewable Energy Solar Panels in Tokelau; Copyright: United Nations Photo/ Ariane Rummery

The course includes lectures on cutting-edge topics and interactive seminars. During this course, learning will take place in a very direct and hands on manner. You will meet with representatives of the corporate, non-profit and governmental energy sector and get the chance to ask them questions about their work and their expertise areas.  The schedule includes a visit to an energy production facility, as well as a dynamic two-day simulation of political climate change negotiations. This will allow you to place yourselves in the shoes of top policy makers and attempt to solve some of the biggest challenges of our time: increasing pollution, energy resources scarcity and climate change.

UN Climate Change Conference in Doha; Copyright: United Nations Photo/ Mark Garten

UN Climate Change Conference in Doha; Copyright: United Nations Photo/ Mark Garten

You can find more information about the course at: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/summer/programmes/undergraduatesummerschool/modules/Kingslegallondon/Global-Energy-Politics.aspx

Do drop me a line if you have any questions at amb225@cam.ac.uk. I would love to hear from you.

I am looking forward to meeting you and working with you in July.

Alexandra M Bocse, Course Tutor