The United Kingdom as a Symbol of Constitutionalism

by Helin Maria Laufer Abstract: The article focuses on the doctrines underlying the constitution in the United Kingdom and their significance internationally. _____________________ The United Kingdom is considered as a constitutional monarchy. Although the nature of the United Kingdom’s constitution is to some extent unclear as it is not codified, there is no doubt that… More The United Kingdom as a Symbol of Constitutionalism

The Conventions of the United Kingdom and a New Written Constitution

(This is the third part of a three-part series on the codification of the United Kingdom) By Ezgi Sahin   The constitution of the United Kingdom (hereinafter ‘UK’) is unique in both implementation and development, having unwritten aspects which are mostly composed of conventions and lacking a single written document unlike many other countries in… More The Conventions of the United Kingdom and a New Written Constitution

Should Britain Adopt a Written Constitution?

(This is the second part of a three-part series on the codification of the United Kingdom) By Isabella Reynoso   A constitution is essential for the organization of a state as it contains the fundamental principles and rules upon which a state exists (Beatson, 2010). Although the British constitution contains written sources such as statutes,… More Should Britain Adopt a Written Constitution?

Codification of the Constitution – A three-part series

We will be releasing a three-part series on the codification of the Constitution in the United Kingdom. The Constitution in the United Kingdom is one of few Constitutions that have yet to be codified. This is a controversial issue that had raised numerous debates both within legal academia and the in politics. As the debate… More Codification of the Constitution – A three-part series

Case Comment

  Case-Comment: Attorney-General v Jonathan Cape Ltd [1975] 3 All E.R. 484                                                                                                                                                                                      Jessica Parry   i.     Introduction This case is focused on the Crossman Diaries and whether the restraint of publication of this text is in the public interest on the grounds of preserving the doctrine of collective responsibility. The relevant parties to this… More Case Comment

Greeting from the New Editor

This is Narutoshi Yoshida, the new editor of the KSLR Constitutional Law Blog from this year, 2013. Stay tuned, I shall start to upload exciting and “spicy” articles on the blog soon. In the meantime please feel free to contact me and/or Nina at blogs@kslr.org.uk if you would like to submit your essays for consideration.

Comparison of the Status of the Monarch’s Speech in Parliament between the UK and Japan

1.Introduction Both the United Kingdom and Japan have had a constitutional monarchy for a long period of history. The monarch acts as the “head of state”, and many royal prerogatives have been removed by Parliament and the cabinet under each country’s constitution in recent years. However, the monarchs of both countries still have an important… More Comparison of the Status of the Monarch’s Speech in Parliament between the UK and Japan

The Arab Spring – The Seeds of Change

A decade ago, Susan Marks (arguably one of the big names in legal theory) tried to rationalise the relationship between theory and practice in the context of paradigm-shifting events. She did so in a paper reflecting on an unexpected reaction from a conference attendee: “Reflections on a Teach-in Walk-out.” January 2002, Afghanistan is invaded by… More The Arab Spring – The Seeds of Change