Europe.think.again – Call for Ideas

Dear All,

The KSLR EU Law Blog is pleased to share with you a EU-related project managed by “Foraus Global”, a Swiss think tank on foreign policy.

In view of the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome establishing the European Economic Community on 25 March 2017, Foraus Global is publishing a short collection of ideas to reform European cooperation.

For more information, please visit the following page: europe.think.again project.

If you are interested in participating or you have further questions, please contact Laura Knopfel (laura.knopfel@kcl.ac.uk). 

We look forward to hearing from you!

The KSLR EU Law Blog editorial team

 

Refusal to refer for a preliminary ruling and a right to a fair trial: Strasbourg court’s position

Agne Limante (MA, PhD) is a Research Fellow at the Law Institute of Lithuania.

The duty of last instance national courts to submit preliminary references to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) is analysed by academics almost exclusively in the light of the Luxembourg Court’s case law. However, the case law of European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) also appears to be relevant in this context. In several instances the ECtHR was asked whether non-referral of preliminary questions to the CJEU constituted a breach of Article 6 ECHR, guaranteeing the right to a fair trial.[1] This post aims at providing some reference in this regard. First, it briefly describes the rules governing the preliminary reference procedure. Then, it analyses the ECtHR’s judgements relevant to this subject. Some conclusions will follow.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

The KSLR EU Law Blog hereby invites you to submit abstracts for blog posts on

 any area of EU law

(including but not limited to internal market, financial regulation, human rights, data-protection, environment).

Submissions covering any of the following topics are particularly welcome:

  • UK Referendum’s effects on EU law and European integration
  • EU migration law and refugees’ crisis
  • EU law and institutional balances
  • Developments on the relationship between EU law and International law
  • Recent developments of EU social policies

We also invite submissions on:

  • Coverage of EU law-related events
  • Reviews of recently published EU law-related books as well as
  • Recent developments of EU case law

Ideally we are looking for 1000 – 1500 words articles.

Please refer to our style guidelines.

Please send an abstract or full articles to giulia.gentile@kcl.ac.uk and giorgia.sangiuolo@kcl.ac.uk by 31 January 2017.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Brexit Breakdown

Ioanna Hadjiyianni and Amanda Spalding, PhD Candidates, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London

On the 23th of June 2016 the UK public voted to leave the European Union. Neither Whitehall nor the Leave campaign appear to have been prepared for such a result and the many legal and political issues it raises. In this post we will attempt to give an overview of some of the most significant legal questions raised by Brexit and how they might be resolved.

  1. What happens now?

The current state of affairs is that the New Settlement for the United Kingdom within the European Union negotiated by Cameron and reached at the European Council in February 2016 will not apply and no longer exists.[1] The overwhelming question now is whether the result of the EU referendum has legally binding effect and would thus trigger the withdrawal procedure under EU law. The only acceptable procedure for withdrawal from the EU is provided for in Article 50 of the Treaty on the European Union (TEU) as the UK cannot unilaterally withdraw by suspending the European Communities Act 1972 consistently with international law and EU law requirements.[2] 

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We Need To Talk About Dublin

Antonino Cento is an LLB student of the University of Tours (France)/University of Bristol and Editor of the French student-led law journal Le Petit Juriste.

The International Organisation for Migration has said that over a million migrants and refugees have reached Europe in 2015. The legal instrument envisaged for examining asylum claims within the European Union has proven shamefully inadequate to the task. Continue reading