Student Profile: Mari Joins Okavango Field Project

Following the previous post on the Okavango field project, we’re introducing Mari, one of our mix of BA, BSc, MSc students joining the trip. We’ll be featuring more stories from student and from the field so keep checking on our blog as well as twitter @ KingsWaterKCL !

” I am a final year BA geography student from West Wales graduating this July. I have spent the majority of my three years at King’s trying to find a balance between the human and physical disciplines of the subject. My interests lie in the meeting point of social-political dynamics and the physical conditions they are situated within. I have particularly enjoyed the various political ecology and related modules available at King’s to further this interest.

Throughout my three years here I have found a real passion for research, particularly in the developing country context. Previous studies I have been involved in have included fieldwork in Kerala, India in the second year; as well as a self organised Royal Geographical Society part-funded research trip to Napo in Ecuador to collect dissertation data. These experiences of international research have provided me with valuable experiences of research and other cultures.

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My trip to the Okavango is funded by the King’s Undergraduate Research Fellowship (KURF) under the guidance of Dr. Naho Mirumachi.  It presents a final opportunity to get involved in an interdisciplinary study at King’s and hope to further my research experience with fieldwork in Okavango, Botswana.

I hope to better understand the dynamics of the river delta, including the socio-political structures that influence the river itself as well as development in the region. I also hope to benefit from working within an academic team, as well as in collaboration with students and lecturers from other universities across the world (Australia and the US) within the PLuSAlliance. Hopefully this fieldwork will result in the creation of a new truly interdisciplinary module for future students at King’s – something that I believe is vital to our subject. “

Setting off: Okavango field project for interdisciplinary learning

This month, King’s Water staff and students will travel to the Okavango delta in Botswana for an interdisciplinary project on river sustainability.  As part of the Global River Basins Connections project funded by the PLuS Alliance, a network between Kings, Univ of New South Wales and Arizona State Univ, this trip aims to enhance experiential learning on key issues of river basin management, water cooperation and conflict and human-ecosystem dependence.

The Okavango delta is a significant biodiversity hotspot as well as a UNESCO World Heritage site.  The management of the river requires international cooperation with the river being shared between Botswana, Namibia and Angola.  This basin has also recently experienced drought, making the question of sustainability even more pressing.

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Students from the three universities will working together to practise various field sampling, survey skills and monitoring methods to understand the river and terrestrial environment as well as enhance their knowledge of river basin governance, development and geopolitics in this  transboundary setting.

From King’s Water, Dr Mike Chadwick, Dr Naho Mirumachi and Dr Emma Tebbs coordinates this trip to pilot an interdisciplinary fieldwork module for the Geography Department.  Six undergraduate and master’s students from the department have been selected on a competitive basis to join this trip.

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Video summary: King’s Water colleagues speak at St Paul’s Cathedral

Last month, King’s Water co-convened an event on water politics at the iconic St Paul’s Cathedral.  This event was part of JustWater, a series of activities by St Paul’s Institute to raise awareness about water issues.

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(Photo credit: Graham Lacdao)

From King’s Water, Dr Naho Mirumachi spoke about the socio-economics and political power asymmetries that determine water use rather than the climate or hydrology.  Prof Tony Allan spoke about the critical role of farmers and consumers in ensuring water stewardship when food production is so dependant on managing water well.

The video of the event can be seen here.

 

King’s Water at St Paul’s Cathedral

King’s Water and St Paul’s Institute are hosting an event on water politics at the iconic St Paul’s Cathedral.

From King’s Water, Dr Naho Mirumachi and Prof Tony Allan will be joining the debate.

This free event will take place 6:30-8:00 pm on Monday 19 June and is open to the general public.  Speakers will discuss the contentions as well as transformative potential of water management and stewardship, touching upon issues of geopolitics, climate, food and more.  This event is part of an initiative, ‘Just Water’ to raise awareness and activism around water.

Register here:

waterpoliticstickets.eventbrite.co.uk

Water Politics event flyer social media image

XVI World Water Congress

Four King’s Water doctoral researchers have just completed an interdisciplinary methods experiment in the Yucatan Peninsula. The trip included presentations at the XVI World Water Congress and the formation of a new institutional partnership with CICY, the Centre for the Scientific Study of the Yucatan.

King's Cancun team with CICY students  Continue reading

Spotlight on the MSc Water: Science and Governance programme

 

The MSc Water: Science and Governance programme draws on the university’s leading reputation in water research to equip students with advanced interdisciplinary training to tackle the contemporary challenges of diverse water environments around the world.

Combined with international research excellence in water science, policy and politics, the programme offers a unique learning experience as well as access to a range of professional networks which include government, industry and NGO sectors.  From academic year 2017-18, this programme will also incorporate the former MSc Aquatic Resource Management making it deeply rooted in King’s College London’s long-standing experience and expertise in providing in-depth fundamental and applied training in freshwater and estuarine science and management.

Students benefit from lectures, seminars, lab and field sessions informed by cutting-edge insights from King’s Water research spearheaded by 12 staff.  Key features of the MSc programme include a residential field trip in Shropshire and Wales, guest talks by leading scientists and professionals, weekly research seminars, internships and dissertation placement.  The London location also offers excellent opportunities for professional networking.  This year, students have attended meetings co-hosted by King’s Water and International Commission on Irrigation & Drainage, the British Ecological Society, the Institute for Fisheries Management; started internships with WWF-UK, at Harvard; and will take part in an interdisciplinary field project in the Okavango River basin, Botswana.

Applications for 2017-18 entry can be found here.

 

Students enjoying a meal with MSc Water alumna currently working in the water utility sector

Students enjoying a meal with MSc Water alumna currently working in the water utility sector

 

Upcoming Seminar: Dar Si Hmad at Oxford

PhD researcher Becca Farnum will be speaking with representatives from her Moroccan research partner Dar Si Hmad at ZSL’s Conservation Optimism Summit for Earth Day 2017. While in the UK, the Environmental Youth Ambassadors will be giving an academic seminar at the University of Oxford exploring Fog, Education, and Resilience in Morocco.

Dar Si Hmad is a local NGO promoting sustainable livelihoods in Southwest Morocco. Their innovative fog-harvesting system, which recently won the UNFCCC Momentum for Change Award at COP22, supplies rural communities with potable water for household use as well as reforestation and community garden projects. The Environmental Youth Ambassadors programme trains urban youth in journalism and education to bridge the gap between city and countryside. EYAs support the Water School, bringing environmental STEM education to marginalised communities in Ait Baamrane.

fog nets w logoIn this special seminar, representatives from Dar Si Hmad will share the technology of fog-harvesting, highlight local interventions for women’s empowerment and children’s learning, and talk about how this local case study is shaped by and can inform wider narratives of development, water security, and community resilience. Attendees will have the opportunity to interact with a model of CloudFisher technology, view short environmental films produced by Moroccan young people, and participate in new videos being created to support the Water School.

The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, please see https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fog-education-and-resilience-in-morocco-tickets-33655117362.

Please contact Rebecca Farnum (rebecca.farnum@kcl.ac.uk) with any questions.

Event this Friday: Swamps and Agricultural Drainage

The last Environmental Dynamics Seminar of the year will take place this Friday from 17:15-18:15 in the Pyramid Room (K4U.04).

Dr Stephanie Evers from Liverpool John Moores University will be talking about how tropical peat swamps are being impacted by drainage for agriculture and whether sustainable development of tropical peatlands is possible.

The seminar will be followed by a drinks reception in the department. The event is free and open to the public.

 

Friday peatland seminar flyer

King’s Water undergraduate research placements

King’s College London is a research-led and student-centred university. The calibre of our research and teaching is among the very best in the world. It is our belief that our students should be involved in the cutting-edge research that makes King’s the university that it is today. King’s Undergraduate Research Fellowships give undergraduate students the unique opportunity to learn alongside leading academics. This year, King’s Water is proud to announce that several of the KRUF positions are for placements with our staff.

Continue reading

Upcoming talk: “Landslides, (Palaeo)Floods, and Tornadoes”

The Department of Geography has recently launched a series of Departmental Talks marking recently completed sabbatical leave. In the second installment, Bruce Malamud will be speaking on “From landslides, (palaeo)floods and tornadoes to hazard interactions”This talk will take place on Tuesday 7th March at 6pm in Room S-2.08, with free drinks served beforehand from 5.15pm in the 4th Floor Geography social space.

A sabbatical is a focussed period to work on existing projects you have not been able to focus on, begin new research, and to apply for grants for future research, so that you have research ‘fat’ that will carry you over during the busy periods of teaching and administration upon return from your sabbatical. Paraphrasing from a meeting with Denise Lievesley (former Dean of SSPP) Bruce Malamud reflects on research undertaken and grants applied for and obtained, during his one year sabbatical (2015/16). Research included work on landslides, palaeofloods, tornadoes, hazard interactions, and invasive alien species, resulting in 6 papers submitted (4 now published/in-press). Grants submitted that were successful included: (i) as lead investigator a £2M NERC/DFID grant ‘LANDSLIP’ on early warning systems of landslides in India (with KCL co-investigators G. Adamson, A. Donovan, M. Pelling), and 2 small grants (£90k PhD studentship on UK hazard interactions with EDF energy, and €4k for a secondary school workshop in Malawi), and (ii) as co-investigator one large and one medium grant. The talk will focus on some of the research worked on during this period, the 4-year grant LANDSLIP in India which was applied for and started Nov. 2016, and some slides from countries visited (often together with other KCL staff members) during his sabbatical year, which included Austria, China, DPRK, Germany, India, Italy, Kenya, Malawi, Spain and USA.

 

Event flyer for Bruce Malamud's research talk on 7 March