Undergraduate Summer School Social Programme

As summer is edging ever nearer we wanted to let you know all about our exciting social programme for students at the Undergraduate Summer School. The Summer Programmes team works with King’s College London Student Union to create a social programme that compliments the academic programme and gives you the chance to explore London and make new friends. Activities will take place on evenings and weekends, meaning once class is finished for the day, you are able to take part in some (or all) of these excellent events.

For each session there will be an ‘Official’ Opening Party and also a Thames Boat Party. Both are great opportunities to make new friends, spend time with your classmates and to chat to staff at KCLSU and the Summer Programmes team.

theatreshowsLondon is home to the West End and is a hub for musical and other theatrical performances. And for this years summer school, students will get the opportunity to see some of the best shows around. For both sessions there are tickets available to see The Lion King. In Session One you will also be able to see Wicked and in Session Two you will have the opportunity to purchase tickers to Aladdin. Tickets are limited so do book early to avoid disappointment!

We also have some brilliant day time activities. In both sessions students are able to spend the day exploring the historical towns of Oxford and Windsor- the Queen’s favourite holiday home. And for Session One only there will be a number of tickets available for the Harry Potter Studio Tour. Here you will spend time admiring the sets featured in the movies, as well as sampling butter beer and riding a broomstick.

wtourWalking around London is by far the best way to see it. And this summer you’ll also be able to take part in a number of walking tours. In the first session students are able to explore the quirky Camden Market and the quaint Notting Hill and Portobello Market. And in the second session you’ll be able to visit the locations used in the Harry Potter movies, as well as a Theatre Land Tour of London.

If you are interested in any of the trips mentioned above and listed on the website please do book your tickets early. There are a limited amount of tickets for some events, so if you really do want to go book as soon as you can. Throughout these events we want to see how much of a great time you’re having, so please do like/follow us and share your pictures on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

We look forward to seeing you this summer!

 

 

 

 

My time at the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Summer School

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As a final year medical student I was due to spend Summer 2015 on an elective in Belize. When this fell through at the last minute I ended up doing my elective in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at St Thomas’ Hospital. Following this I was invited to be a mentor in their summer school alongside 5 other final year students.

The summer school took place over five days, with each mentor being assigned four students. On the first day of the summer school we mentors taught the students basic obstetric and gynaecological examinations and skills. The students were then given a timetable for the rest of the week where they would attend clinics and theatre to get an idea of the specialty. In addition to their time spent in the hospital, we asked the students to prepare a very brief presentation on something about the course that they had found particularly interesting. The students presented these to the mentors and course organisers on the final day of the course and we had a small ceremony where they received certificates for their participation.

The course proved to be a valuable experience for both students and mentors. As mentors we got to experience what it feels like to be responsible for a group of colleagues, trying to ensure that they got the best learning experience they could. This wasn’t always easy due to the busy nature of obstetrics and gynaecology, but for the most part we managed to make sure everyone got to experience all areas and had an enjoyable time.

It definitely made me personally appreciate how much work goes into organising our medical course and develop a new respect for the people who do so. For the students, the course gave them an excellent insight into a new specialty, with the chance to practice skills that most don’t get the chance to learn until 4th year and the opportunity to practice their presenting skills which are a big part of medicine.

Overall the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Summer School proved to be one of the things that turned my makeshift elective in the UK into a really enjoyable and worthwhile experience I would highly recommend it to both those interested in being a student or a mentor.

By Isabella Fernandes

What is great about teaching on the Summer School?

UntitledThe Summer School should be fun. But also achieve interpersonal growth and fire up passion for higher education. Still further, amidst the busy lives of young people, it should bring about such outcomes with speed and panache; most certainly, it should be a substantive variation on information available via Wiki, FB, Twitter, et cetera. So, what is it like to teach faced with such challenges?

I teach Politics and International Relations and my experience has shown that the humanities encourage creativity. I still want students to read without worry they’d be called nerds if they do so also over the summer. A vital tool of Summer School teaching is the practice of the subject. My students partake in daily strategy games, such as negotiations and simulations, like the United Nations Security Council Reform Group; international trade games; smart city building exercises, and the rest.

My own expertise is key to inspiring and supporting creativity. It comes from constantly researching the subject matter of political science. A great enabler of this is seeing students as a lively focus group that literally takes the pulse of the course through their seminal comments and feedback. Because I teach international students in London and then also take Politics and IR ‘on the road’ to India, my students cover between them a substantive portion of the globe and bring together a myriad of views and expectations. Making sense of the world is about acquiring a key skill, which is the ability to separate information from knowledge. One of the most memorable sayings I heard, whilst lecturing in India, was: “Google cannot find your slippers in the Temple” (which in Hindi translates into something like: Google Apni Chappal Mandir Se Nahi Dhoond sakta.) Indeed, my students often find that social media is a phenomenal way to exchange beacons, whilst the Summer School enables the connection of a great series of these to create a whole and gain a different (critical!) understanding of the world altogether.

In my next entry, I will offer a practical example of this, focusing on the forthcoming UK in/out EU referendum, now only weeks away!