It Stops Here is a collaborative campaign by King’s College London and KCLSU and began as a movement to challenge sexual harassment on campus. The campaign aims to empower members of the King’s community to help build an environment where everyone feels welcome, supported and safe regardless of who they are.

It Stops Here has now been extended to include all forms of bullying and harassment, with a particular focus on religious hate crime. The funding presents an exciting opportunity to build on the work already established around prevention and responses to bullying and harassment – to recognize the needs of religious communities within King’s, particularly focusing on incidents of antisemitism and Islamophobia.

The expansion of It Stops Here reflects the importance King’s places on ensuring an institution-wide, comprehensive and systemic approach to tackling and monitoring harassment, bullying, hate crime and discrimination– Sarah Guerra, Director of Diversity & Inclusion

It Stops Here is a collaborative campaign by King’s College London and KCLSU and began as a movement to challenge sexual harassment on campus. The campaign aims to empower members of the King’s community to help build an environment where everyone feels welcome, supported and safe regardless of who they are.

It Stops Here has now been extended to include all forms of bullying and harassment, with a particular focus on religious hate crime. The funding presents an exciting opportunity to build on the work already established around prevention and responses to bullying and harassment – to recognize the needs of religious communities within King’s, particularly focusing on incidents of antisemitism and Islamophobia.

This reflects work taking place nationally in response to the UUK’s Changing the Culture report which set out a range of recommendations for universities around institutional responses to violence against women, harassment and hate crime affecting university students.

Operating as part of a collaborative network with the ten other universities receiving the funding and led by the Diversity & Inclusion team, King’s will work with staff and students across the institution including various faith communities and the chaplaincy at King’s, to understand better their experiences.

This will include work to establish and strengthen reporting mechanisms and support new infrastructure and facilities. The team will also work to build awareness, understanding and tolerance of different faiths and how discrimination occurs by enhancing existing training programmes for students and staff. This includes peer-led active bystander training for students, which encourages people to feel confident in taking steps to stop a situation from escalating, and disclosure training for staff. There will also be a programme of collaborative events with faith communities and student leaders.

It Stops Here will also look at developing responses to politically-motivated hate crime which targets students of a particular religion or belief. This work will all feed in to university-wide policies around student misconduct and improving data collection for monitoring. This project will be supported by two internships for King’s students next summer.

Sarah Guerra, Director of Diversity & Inclusion commented following the funding announcement: ‘We are proud to have a diverse and vibrant community at King’s College London and we are working hard to ensure equality, diversity and inclusion are a reality and embedded into all aspects of King’s life and work.

‘The expansion of It Stops Here reflects the importance King’s places on ensuring an institution-wide, comprehensive and systemic approach to tackling and monitoring harassment, bullying, hate crime and discrimination.’

 


Strength of a Woman: Press for Progress for International Women’s Day 2018

​The theme for International Women’s Day 2018 is Press for Progress. Across the world, women are making positive and empowered progress every day. All progress, however small or ordinary it may seem, is one more positive step towards reaching gender equality.

In this spirit, the Arts & Sciences Directorate at King’s College London is hosting parallel talks on Wednesday 7 March 2018, as well as an exhibition on 7 and 8 March. Inspired by the IWD 2018 theme, this event will explore stories of progress achieved by women, celebrating their lives, experiences and their legacies. We will hear from staff and students from across Arts and Humanities, The Dickson Poon School of Law, Natural and Mathematical Sciences and Social Science and Public Policy.

The talks take place on Wednesday 7 March, 1 -2:15pm in the Edmund Safra Lecture Theatre, Strand Building.

Film Screening: Hidden Figures 

Join King’s College London societies, Women in Dentistry and Women in STEM, to celebrate International Women’s Day with a screening of the iconic film Hidden Figures, followed by a networking drinks reception on the Terrace on Thursday the 8th March.

We invite professionals, academics and students of all genders and ethnicities. Please remember to bring along photographic ID.

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Introduction to Feminist Legal Theory

At this event, participants will be introduced to Feminist Legal Theory and how this strand of scholarship has not only attempted to expose the ways the law perpetuates gender inequalities, but also whether, and if so how, the law might be an instrument with which to achieve gender justice and equality.

Transnational Legal Feminism Seminar

For the final class of the Transnational Legal Feminism module for LLM students, the conveners have organised a panel event specifically on feminism activism, considered through an intersectional and transnational lens. Transnational legal feminism challenges and critiques Western ideas of ‘global’ or ‘international’ feminisms. It challenges the idea that women’s experiences around the world can be united under one umbrella of ‘global’ feminism. It argues for a feminism that considers the different subjectivities and ideas of women around the globe as influenced by distinctive cultures, histories and beliefs.

Film Screening: Suffragette

The Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine is hosting a screening of the film Suffragette on the 8th March, from 4.30pm in room 5.132 in FWB, Waterloo Campus.

Florence Nightingale: An Icon for Today?

Presented by Anne Marie Rafferty, Professor of Nursing Policy at the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery & Palliative Care at King’s College London. In her talk, Professor Rafferty will explain how the legacy of Nightingale lives on, making her an icon for today. Find out about Nightingale’s character – what made her tick as a person? How did this impact her contribution to healthcare? Discover the legacy of her work in its varied contributions to health and beyond.

Women in Science – Our Space, Our Legacies

The Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine is launching Women in Science – Our Space, Our Legacies and asking staff and students  to submit their suggestions of prominent women who have worked either in King’s or locally, whose work has made a historic impact in the fields of medicine and bioscience. Nominees cannot be people wo are currently employed at King’s, however they can be any women, alive or dead, whose legacy has had impact for King’s or our society/community more widely.

Participants can submit their nominations to diversity-folsm@kcl.ac.uk before the 8th April along with a statement about why they are nominating the individual. Winners will be chosen by members of the Faculty Diversity and Inclusion Steering Group and will be invited to a celebratory reception.

 


 


LGBT+ History Month at King’s was marked by a plethora of screenings, workshops and celebrations including the rainbow flag flying over the Maughan Library, thanks to the LGBT+ Staff Network!

You can find out more about our work around LGBT+ by checking out our Guidance and Resources pages, including our new Trans Matters Toolkit,  and connecting with the LGBT+ Staff Network. 

It Stops Here Fortnight

29th January – 9th March 2018

From the 29th January to the 9th February, King’s celebrated It Stops Here Fortnight to raise the profile of King’s zero-tolerance approach to sexual violence, harassment and bullying through Student Ambassador events and to celebrate the launch of new student and staff training products at King’s.

The fortnight was marked with a range of student-led events run in collaboration with KCLSU societies, with a screening of the Hunting Ground documentary and a ‘Can’t Touch This’ club night at Guy’s Bar.

Previously only available to new first-year students, King’s launched Consent Matters university-wide so that now all members of the campus community can take the course, pledging to educate themselves about consent and sexual harassment. Consent Matters is an online module that will help students understand how they can make a positive change through respectful relationships, sexual consent and bystander intervention.

For staff, King’s launched the It Stops Here Training Academy, an interactive online hub and comprehensive resource dedicated to harassment and sexual violence disclosure response training and resources for academic and professional services staff at King’s. The It Stops Here Training Academy includes the online course Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Violence, It Stops Here Classroom Toolkit as well as information and resources to equip King’s staff to adequately and confidently respond to other forms of harassment, including homophobic, transphobic and racially motivated harassment, and provides advice on reporting and support services at King’s.

Since September last year, the response to the It Stops Here training products has been largely positive, with 680 students completing Consent Matters and 42 members of staff participating in the It Stops Here Training Academy within a fortnight of the launch.  With the #metoo movement dominating social media and news headlines, we are encouraging all staff and students to take the training courses, as well as Active Bystander  and Disclosure Response training and support consent education and safe interventions to make the King’s campus community a safer place.

Disability History Month 2017

On Thursday the 14th November, King’s D&I celebrated Disability History Month, hosting a short film breakfast screening in the Arcade at Bush House and in the IoPPN Canteen in Denmark Hill. With the 2017 theme as art, we sought to showcase the experience of various visible and invisible disabilities through the medium of short film, all from the perspective of the people with disabilities themselves.

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For those who couldn’t make it, you can access the films (with subtitles) on Youtube:

A time lapse of me mouth painting by Henry Fraser

I had a black dog, his name was depression by World Health Organisation

My First Guide Dog – A life changing experience by Daniel Williams

King’s Disability Advisory Service: Nine tips for students by students