New report on outcomes of perpetrator programmes

DVIP report front cover

The Domestic Violence Intervention Project (DVIP)  and Cranstoun has published a report detailing outcomes of working with 30 male perpetrators of domestic violence in a substance treatment context. The report documents what has been learnt from the pilot programme that assesses and treats a group of men disclosing behavioural concerns relating to substance us and DV.

DVIP and Cranstoun jointly developed a safety focussed, 60+ hours day programme designed to support the aims and objectives of a substance use treatment programme. It combines the two working styles by using emotionally challenging and more general self-talk and CBT material. The assessment process used to recruit men to the group showed the majority of men had used severe and persistent violence and abuse in their intimate relationships.

Outcomes

1. 87% of men started treatment  

2. 77% of men completed over 30 hours of DV prevention work

3. Men on the programme reduced their drug/alcohol use by 29% and reported a 40% improvement in their quality of life

4. The combined intervention did not impinge on the aims of the substance use treatment

5. Active contact was established with 53% of ex/partners

6. Only 1 woman disclosed an incidence of violence during the programme

7. 87% of men commenced treatment

8. 77% of men completed more than 30 hours of treatment

The report concluded:

The high proportion of men using persistent and severe violence and abuse in their relationships and the programme outcomes highlight the need for a combined intervention. The authors recommend that other domestic violence and substance misuse agencies bring together their skills and understanding to deliver joint substance misuse and domestic violence interventions. All joint work should be conducted alongside a partner support service and delivered by dedicated and experienced staff to allow for a comprehensive case and risk management process to take place alongside service delivery.

If you would like more details please contact Cranstoun on 0207 923 8010.

You can download the report here.

 

 

 

 

 

Justice secretary Liz Truss orders review to prevent abusers cross-examining partners in family courts

Truss photo

The Guardian on the 5th January reported that Liz Truss has set up an urgent review to ban perpetrators of domestic violence cross-examining their X partners in family courts. She argues this practice has permitted continued harassment and intimidation by abusers and needs to be prevented. Campaigners and legal representatives in the field have been calling for an end to this practice and highlighting that family courts are way behind criminal courts in this matter. An emergency paper has been proposed to introduce a swift ban to this type of cross-examination in family courts.

Please find the full article here.