Podcast ‘What’s the Crack’ discussing Intimate Partner Violence and substance use

A new podcast is available called ‘What’s the Crack’ discussing intimate partner violence (IPV) and substance use. The podcast takes the form of an interview with Dr Gail Gilchrist. Gail discusses national and international studies she has conducted alongside other researchers on substance use and perpetration of IPV.  She highlights unmet need in treatment services to identify and treat this violence. Research shows that there is a strong link between substance use and IPV (which includes both emotional abuse and physical perpetration). This podcast details the many reasons why this population of men may perpetrate violence more than the general population. For example perpetrators may have experienced childhood abuse themselves, witnessing DV in childhood, have mental health problems and have seen general violence in their childhood and perpetrated violence more generally.

Each episode of What’s the Crack draws on knowledge or research in drugs field the researchers Rob Calder, Lindsey Hines and Elle Wadsworth are based at the National Addiction Centre at Kings College London. The aim of the podcasts is move away from one dimensional news coverage and combine a pool of expertise that covers chemistry, psychology and addiction treatment. The research interests for the podcasts are broad including the causes of addiction, drug sales on the hidden web, policy, and the use of cannabis, alcohol, tobacco and opiates.

You can listen to this podcast by clicking here.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

We would like to draw you attention to October as being Domestic Violence Awareness Month. You may be planning to encourage awareness and create some interesting event or materials, you could plan an event to coincide with the 18th annual Health Cares About Domestic Violence (HCADV) Day. This year it is taking place on Wednesday, October 11th  the events aim to reach healthcare and advocacy partners with information about how important it is to promote healthy relationships, address the health impact of abuse and provide essential referrals to domestic violence programs.

Find resources to help you plan your event or materials by using an action kit here.

  • Writing a newsletter article or an op-ed for a local paper, or your workplace newsletter. View an example.
  • Committing to try universal education for one week.
  • Inviting a speaker (such as a domestic violence advocate from your community or a health care provider from your local health center or hospital) to conduct a lunchtime presentation for staff.
  • Connecting with staff from the National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence to localize materials such as posters and safety cards, and to advertise local hotlines and community programs.

Thank you to Futures without Violence for providing the links and information for this blog post.

futures dv day

If you decide to run an event then please contact Juliet.henderson@kcl.ac.uk and we would be happy to promote your event through our blog.

Cranstoun Men and Masculinities groups taking place in London

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Leaflets to promote the Cranstoun Men and Masculinities groups taking place in London have been launched and are now being distributed. The leaflets seek to attract new men to the group who are recovering from alcohol and drug use and who would like to improve their relationships and their understanding of themselves.  You can access the mens programme worker leaflet that outlines the programme and provides contact details and another shorter version mens group short leaflet.

Stalking report published by HMIC

 

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A report called ‘The Victim Journey’ investigating stalking and harassment has been published by Dr Holly Taylor-Dunn, Professor Erica Bowen and Professor Liz Gilchrist from the Centre for Violence Prevention at Worcester University. The work was commissioned by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate Constabulary and covers in-depth qualitative interviews with three themes: the nature of stalking and harassment disclosed by participants, the impact of stalking and harassment on the victims and the views and experiences of investigation by the police and where relevant the CPS.

The key messages from the report were that the nature of stalking has a significant impact on the physical, emotional and psychological well being of the victims. The majority of the participants had made major changes to their daily routines to avoid offenders. Half the women felt unsafe and many had installed security systems. The report concluded it is imperative for police to be given time to talk to victims about the impact of stalking and harassment.

Please follow the link to read the report in full here.

 

New resource launched to support women experiencing domestic violence

women speak out

Dr Emma Watson Head for the Centre for Gender and Violence research has co-led a project that includes over 30 audio interviews with women describing domestic abuse. She says “Personal stories open a ‘window’ into real-life experiences, providing insight to others. We are extremely grateful to the women who chose to speak out about their experiences of domestic violence and abuse. Although speaking about these experiences can be difficult, the women wanted to help others in similar situations and to let friends, family and professionals know how best to help if they think a woman is being abused.’

The accounts document different types of abuse including physical, emotional, financial and sexual abuse. The women are from a range of different cultural backgrounds and are aged between 20 – 62. Their accounts also focus on cohersive controlling behaviour and the importance of making a safety plan when preparing to leave abusive relationships.

Please find more information about this resource here.

Her majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Crown Prosecution Service inspectorate publish their first report on harassment and stalking

living in

This new report explores the police and CPS’s response to victims of stalking and harassment and provides recommendations for best practice. The introduction suggests that victim testimonies point to stalking affecting all ages and backgrounds in society. They found that stalking was often misunderstood by the police and the CPS and went unrecognised. The report suggests a single accepted definitions of stalking and harassment would help combat this problem leading the way for stalking specific powers to be used to search premises and seize evidence. The authors also identified that crime recording for these types of crimes are often inaccurate and this is important in terms of allocating police resources to decide where and how to allocate officers and how to spend local budgets. Another finding is that the police often do not see the bigger picture from the victims point of view, as they continue to record single events rather than looking at a pattern of offending behaviour.

You can view a copy of the report here.

Alcohol study shows moderate reductions in alcohol admissions and violent and sexual crimes associated with local alcohol licensing policies

bmj epidemol

 

A news study published in the BMJ Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health  shows there is a moderate reduction in alcohol admission and violent and sexual assaults as a result of local alcohol licensing laws. This study used an innovative methodology to test whether local licensing laws really did have an effect on crimes and alcohol admissions compared to control areas who did not have local alcohol licencing restrictive laws. The authors used Home Office licensing data (2007–2012) to identify (1) interventions: local areas where both a cumulative impact zone and increased licensing enforcement were introduced in 2011; and (2) controls: local areas with neither.

You can access a summary of the study and a PDF of the paper here.

A new article in Plos One indicates that IPV adversely impacts on health over a 16 year period and across generations

 

plos one australian longitudinal study

Researchers in an Australian study have shown the impact of intimate partner violence  (IPV) on long term health problems for women and their children using longitudinal data. They found this for all cohorts of the women recruited in the Australian Longitudinal study on Women’s health, the participants are made up of  three birth cohorts (1973-78, 1946-1951 and 1921-26). For all cohorts, women who had lived with IPV were more likely to report poorer mental health, physical function and general health and higher levels of bodily pain.

The findings did show some generational differences for example younger women showed a reduction in health association with the onset of IPV which was not apparent for women in the older two groups.

The women were originally randomly selected from the Australian Medicare (i.e. national health insurer) database in 1996 and asked if they would participate in the longitudinal and health wellbeing survey.

 Please find more information on the paper here.

 

Interviews with speakers at the York University conference on women and substance use

york pic women cocaine

As previously mentioned last week, a group of experts representing research, treatment and policy gathered in York. Their aim for the day was to try and take stock of what we already know and what needs to be done about Women and Drugs. The day was organised by Ian Hamilton and chaired by Sharon Grace from the University of York.

Ian Hamilton suggests there are two parallel problems with women and drugs: ‘first we know less about women’s use of drugs than men’s drug use. Secondly we need more women to be represented in research and senior academic positions related to this topic. By addressing both aspects we would not only improve our understanding of the issues women who use drugs face,  but this could also improve the care and support we offer men in treatment.’

Please find interviews with key speakers at the York conference on women and substance use here these interviews discuss topics as diverse as women’s positions in academia and addictions, expectations for the day, discussion of gender based specific services, trauma informed care and stigma felt by female users and work on sleep and recovery.

 

 

Domestic violence conference in London: Lessons from Duluth and Beyond, Coordinated community response and DV perpetrator programmes

dv met uni

The second week in June must be a busy week of DV conferences and events in the UK! If you are located further south in England perhaps this would be more convenient for you to attend. The conference will take place at London Metropolitan University on 6th June 9.30am – 1.30pm.

Information on the event and speakers can be accessed here. A map is also available and contact details to organise your attendance.

Hestia and London Metropolitan University are organising this event featuring two representatives from leading domestic abuse prevention organisations in the United States, the focus of the presentations is looking at the lessons learned from Community Coordinated Response (CCR) and perpetrator programmes.

Overview:

CCR to domestic abuse originated in the early 1980s in Duluth, Minnesota with the twin aims of centering victim safety and holding male perpetrators to account. In 2014, Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs (DAIP), the city of Duluth and St. Louis County were awarded the “Gold Award” from the World Future Council and Inter-Parliamentary Union for the creation of the concept of a CCR.

The Duluth Model has become a ‘world travelling concept’, applied and adapted across different cultural contexts. In the UK, it is claimed as the basis of many of the multi-agency approaches that support victims of domestic abuse.