Stalking report published by HMIC

 

stalking

 

 

 

 

 

A report called ‘The Victim Journey’ investigating stalking and harassment has been published by Dr Holly Taylor-Dunn, Professor Erica Bowen and Professor Liz Gilchrist from the Centre for Violence Prevention at Worcester University. The work was commissioned by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate Constabulary and covers in-depth qualitative interviews with three themes: the nature of stalking and harassment disclosed by participants, the impact of stalking and harassment on the victims and the views and experiences of investigation by the police and where relevant the CPS.

The key messages from the report were that the nature of stalking has a significant impact on the physical, emotional and psychological well being of the victims. The majority of the participants had made major changes to their daily routines to avoid offenders. Half the women felt unsafe and many had installed security systems. The report concluded it is imperative for police to be given time to talk to victims about the impact of stalking and harassment.

Please follow the link to read the report in full here.

 

Alcohol study shows moderate reductions in alcohol admissions and violent and sexual crimes associated with local alcohol licensing policies

bmj epidemol

 

A news study published in the BMJ Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health  shows there is a moderate reduction in alcohol admission and violent and sexual assaults as a result of local alcohol licensing laws. This study used an innovative methodology to test whether local licensing laws really did have an effect on crimes and alcohol admissions compared to control areas who did not have local alcohol licencing restrictive laws. The authors used Home Office licensing data (2007–2012) to identify (1) interventions: local areas where both a cumulative impact zone and increased licensing enforcement were introduced in 2011; and (2) controls: local areas with neither.

You can access a summary of the study and a PDF of the paper here.

A new article in Plos One indicates that IPV adversely impacts on health over a 16 year period and across generations

 

plos one australian longitudinal study

Researchers in an Australian study have shown the impact of intimate partner violence  (IPV) on long term health problems for women and their children using longitudinal data. They found this for all cohorts of the women recruited in the Australian Longitudinal study on Women’s health, the participants are made up of  three birth cohorts (1973-78, 1946-1951 and 1921-26). For all cohorts, women who had lived with IPV were more likely to report poorer mental health, physical function and general health and higher levels of bodily pain.

The findings did show some generational differences for example younger women showed a reduction in health association with the onset of IPV which was not apparent for women in the older two groups.

The women were originally randomly selected from the Australian Medicare (i.e. national health insurer) database in 1996 and asked if they would participate in the longitudinal and health wellbeing survey.

 Please find more information on the paper here.

 

‘The Concept and Measurement of Violence against Women and Men’ has been published by Policy Press

Violence against men and women book

A book published by Sylvia Walby, Jude Towers et al addresses the extent to which violence against women is currently hidden; how violence should be measured; how research and new ways of thinking about violence could improve its measurement; and how improved measurement could change policy. It offers practical guidance on definitions, indicators and coordination mechanisms, including for the measurement of femicide, rape, domestic violence, and FGM.

The book reflects on the theoretical debates: ‘what is gender’, ‘what is violence’ and ‘the concept of coercive control’, and introduces the concept of ‘gender saturated context’.

By analysing the socially constructed nature of statistics and the links between knowledge and power, the authors aim to set new standards and guidelines to influence the measurement of violence in the coming decades.

An open access version is available for free download if you copy the link below and add it to the browser:

https://oapen.org/search?identifier=623150 

Alternatively a paperback can be purchased from Policy Press: here