UPCOMING EVENTS

The Seminars & Events Bulletin for December is here! Check out the event happening at the end of this month too….

Posted by KSLR Commercial & Financial Law Blog on Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Brexit: Where Do We Stand? Conference Report

 Leonardo Pasqui, Erasmus + Trainee at King’s College London

The text below is a report of the Young European Lawyers (YEL) event, held at King’s College London (KCL) on 19 October 19 2018. The event was introduced by Professor Andrea Biondi, Director of the KCL Centre of European Law. The panel included Dr Maria Laura Marceddu, Dr Simon Tans, and Dr Gabriele Gagliani

The three speakers discussed the uncertainties arising out of Brexit in trade related fields: the future relations of the United Kingdom (UK) with the European Union (EU), the freedom of movement of workers, and the rules on intellectual property.

At the outset, the speakers clarified that they acknowledge and respect the will of the British people to leave the EU. Their presentations should thus be read as neutral legal considerations of the consequences of the Brexit vote. Continue reading

UPCOMING EVENTS

6 November, Tuesday1st KCL TTIPills Series EventInvesting in a “Minefield”: Shareholder Voting in Chinese Securities…

Posted by KSLR Commercial & Financial Law Blog on Wednesday, October 31, 2018

THE MORRISONS APPEAL AND VICARIOUS LIABILITY:  DID THE COURT JUST BECOME AN ACCESSORY TO A CRIME?

Meera Manoj, Gujarat National Law University, India

The case of Various Claimants v Wm Morrisons Supermarket PLC (“Morrisons”) decided by the High Court on 12 December 2017[1] is significant for several reasons. In addition to being the first data breach class-action in the United Kingdom, it crucially imposes vicarious liability on Morrison’s Supermarket PLC for the criminal actions of its rogue employee despite the company having taken all reasonable precautions to guard against any data breach.[2] The High Court however granted Morrisons leave to appeal to avoid rendering itself ‘an accessory in furthering the perpetrator’s criminal aims’.[3] Continue reading