CUSP London Seminar: Dani Arribas-Bel

This past Thursday we were really lucky to catch Dani Arribas-Bel, Senior Lecturer in Geographic Data Science at the University of Liverpool and major contributor to PySAL, on his way back home following two weeks’ teaching in the Caribbean. Dani kindly agreed to give a talk in two parts on “Infusing Urban and Regional analysis with Geographic Data Science” (‘GDS’) which we will summarise below… As one of the first CUSP London-branded seminars, it was great to see so many Urban Informatics staff and students there (and even a few from UCL’s CASA!) Continue reading

Fully Funded PhD Studentship Opportunity

We are inviting applications for a fully funded PhD in ‘Improving Efficiency and Equity of Ambulance Services through Advanced Demand Modelling‘. See full details below.

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Job posting – Full-funded PhD position (LISS-DTP 1+3/3+)

Overview of the position
We are looking for a PhD student who will join the Geocomputation Research Domain at the Geography Department of King’s College London. The appointed PhDstudent will work on the project titled “Improving Efficiency and Equity of Ambulance Services through Advanced Demand Modelling”, funded by the ESRC – LISS-DTP and supervised by Dr Chen Zhong and Prof. Judith Green. This PhD project is a collaborative project together with London Ambulance Service (LAS), where Dr Leanne Smith will supervise the project as an industrial advisor. We are seeking a candidate for 1+3/3+ term depending on the qualification of the candidate. For more information about the scholarship, please visit LISS-DTP (https://liss-dtp.ac.uk/case-studentships-student-applicants/).

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Understanding Gentrification through ML

Although it has taken rather a long time to see the light of day, our just-published paper is one of the reasons I love my job: drawing on a mix of data science and deep geographical knowledge, we look at the role that new Machine Learning (ML) techniques – normally seen as just a ‘black box’ for making predictions – can play in helping us to develop a deeper understanding of gentrification and neighbourhood change. For those of a ‘TL;DR’ nature (or without the privilege of an institutional subscription!), we wanted to share some of our key ideas in a more accessible format. Continue reading

Geography & Computers: Past, present, and future

I’m really pleased to share a piece that Dani Arribas-Bel and I recently co-authored in Geography Compass on the sometimes fraught relationship between (human) geography and computers, and advocating for the creation of a Geographic Data Science. For those of a ‘TL; DR’ nature (or without the privilege of an institutional subscription!), we wanted to share some of our key ideas in a more accessible format.

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MoDS: Mapping Knowledge with Data Science (MSc + PhD Studentship)

Although we had some great responses to our initial call, we’re still looking for the ‘right’ candidate for this fully-funded studentship that is open to both undergraduate finalists as well as completing Masters students. The project involves the application of data science techniques (text-mining, topic modelling, graph analysis) to a large, rich data set of 450,000+ PhD theses in order to understand the evolving geography of academic knowledge production: how are groundbreaking ideas produced and circulated, and how does researcher mobility and institutional capacity shape this process?

We’re looking for a great candidate (see ‘pathways’ below) with a demonstrable interest in interdisciplinary research – you will be working in collaboration with the British Library at the intersection between geography, computer science, and the humanities, and this will present unique challenges (and opportunities!) that call for resourcefulness, curiosity, and intellectual excellence. Continue reading

Urban Risk or Resilience? Opportunities for Improving Informal Settlements in Urban Africa

Event Panelists, Photo Credit: Wilson Center

Urban Risk or Resilience? Opportunities for Improving Informal Settlements in Urban Africa

“Most risk in African cities is not catastrophic. It’s not even episodic, but it is every day,” said Mark Pelling, a professor at King’s College, London, at a recent event on urban risk and resilience in sub-Saharan Africa. With rates of rural-to-urban migration reaching record highs, more than half of the urban residents in sub-Saharan Africa live in informal settlements, where they lack basic infrastructure and access to critical resources. Integrated projects like Pelling’s Urban ARK seek to build more resilient communities in cities and informal settlements.

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Urban ARK at IPCC Cities and Climate Change Conference, Edmonton

Urban ARK at IPCC Cities and Climate Change Conference, Edmonton

Several Urban ARK partners contributed to this event, including Mark Pelling (KCL and Urban ARK PI) David Dodman (IIED) (who sat on the organising committee) Hayley Leck (KCL) Lorena Pasquini and Jessica Lee (UCT), Shuaib Lwasa (Makerere University) and Mark Ojal (Nairobi Risk Partnership). The team helped to emphasise the importance and specific needs and opportunities offered by cities in sub-Saharan Africa.

Mark Pelling presented a short statement as part of a plenary on science-policy interactions, the transcript for this is presented below:

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