Student profile : Melanie Atwood

Melanie-atwoodMelanie is the newly elected Geography student representative for the year 1 BSc programme. 

I chose Geography… because I am truly passionate about the subject. Unlike other subjects, Geography is broad and involves not only the world around us, but also how we influence it directly. I particularly enjoy studying both the physical aspect of the subject such as glaciers as well as the human side, in particular sustainability. Continue reading

Strategic Action Planning: From diagnosis to transformative change in Karonga, Malawi and Freetown, Sierra Leone

Undefined

The workshops were a follow up to the process of understanding risk accumulation over time in the two cities and to apply the practices and resources (as part of the “ReMapRisk” process) that had been mobilised to monitor, and study the risk profile, existing initiatives for DRR and capacities to act of community residents and various stakeholders. 

The preliminary findings from the ‘ReMapRisk’ data collection were shared and refined to create a number of strategic action plans in the light of the findings and debates. The participants were encouraged and led to draft plans that were practical and time bound, reflecting on a number of objectives and considerations such as:

  • What are the priority risks to be tackled? Why?
  • How are these issues linked to each other?
  • How are these priority issues likely to change in the future?
  • Who is most vulnerable to them and where?
  • What actions / initiatives are already being taken to meet the strategic targets? What could be improved or changed?
  • What new actions should be taken? Why?
  • Is there the need for more information? What specifically?

Each action plan was drafted at the lowest level of devolved DRR structures that had been identified. In Karonga 4 strategic action plans were prepared by the four Neighbourhood Disaster Risk Management Committees (NRMCs), where as, in Freetown, a total of 15 strategic action plans are being prepared by the five Community-Based Disaster Risk Management Committees (CBDRMCs) found in each of the three districts of the city (Western, Central and Eastern). 

By March 2018, it is expected that each of the action plans created would have been refined and prioritised, with some small seed funding provided by the project for practical interventions and that will serve as a hands-on learning opportunity on community–based DRR.

 

 

 

Standfirst: 

Adriana Allen and Emmanuel Osuteye (University College London, Development Planning Unit)  conducted a series of 2-day Action Planning workshops, in Karonga, Malawi (27-28th July 2017), followed by another in Freetown, Sierra Leone (3-4th  August 2017).

Posted in Uncategorized

Strategic Action Planning: From diagnosis to transformative change in Karonga, Malawi and Freetown, Sierra Leone

Undefined

The workshops were a follow up to the process of understanding risk accumulation over time in the two cities and to apply the practices and resources (as part of the “ReMapRisk” process) that had been mobilised to monitor, and study the risk profile, existing initiatives for DRR and capacities to act of community residents and various stakeholders. 

The preliminary findings from the ‘ReMapRisk’ data collection were shared and refined to create a number of strategic action plans in the light of the findings and debates. The participants were encouraged and led to draft plans that were practical and time bound, reflecting on a number of objectives and considerations such as:

  • What are the priority risks to be tackled? Why?
  • How are these issues linked to each other?
  • How are these priority issues likely to change in the future?
  • Who is most vulnerable to them and where?
  • What actions / initiatives are already being taken to meet the strategic targets? What could be improved or changed?
  • What new actions should be taken? Why?
  • Is there the need for more information? What specifically?

Each action plan was drafted at the lowest level of devolved DRR structures that had been identified. In Karonga 4 strategic action plans were prepared by the four Neighbourhood Disaster Risk Management Committees (NRMCs), where as, in Freetown, a total of 15 strategic action plans are being prepared by the five Community-Based Disaster Risk Management Committees (CBDRMCs) found in each of the three districts of the city (Western, Central and Eastern). 

By March 2018, it is expected that each of the action plans created would have been refined and prioritised, with some small seed funding provided by the project for practical interventions and that will serve as a hands-on learning opportunity on community–based DRR.

 

 

 

Standfirst: 

Adriana Allen and Emmanuel Osuteye (University College London, Development Planning Unit)  conducted a series of 2-day Action Planning workshops, in Karonga, Malawi (27-28th July 2017), followed by another in Freetown, Sierra Leone (3-4th  August 2017).

Posted in Uncategorized

Strategic Action Planning: From diagnosis to transformative change in Karonga, Malawi and Freetown, Sierra Leone

Undefined

The workshops were a follow up to the process of understanding risk accumulation over time in the two cities and to apply the practices and resources (as part of the “ReMapRisk” process) that had been mobilised to monitor, and study the risk profile, existing initiatives for DRR and capacities to act of community residents and various stakeholders. 

The preliminary findings from the ‘ReMapRisk’ data collection were shared and refined to create a number of strategic action plans in the light of the findings and debates. The participants were encouraged and led to draft plans that were practical and time bound, reflecting on a number of objectives and considerations such as:

  • What are the priority risks to be tackled? Why?
  • How are these issues linked to each other?
  • How are these priority issues likely to change in the future?
  • Who is most vulnerable to them and where?
  • What actions / initiatives are already being taken to meet the strategic targets? What could be improved or changed?
  • What new actions should be taken? Why?
  • Is there the need for more information? What specifically?

Each action plan was drafted at the lowest level of devolved DRR structures that had been identified. In Karonga 4 strategic action plans were prepared by the four Neighbourhood Disaster Risk Management Committees (NRMCs), where as, in Freetown, a total of 15 strategic action plans are being prepared by the five Community-Based Disaster Risk Management Committees (CBDRMCs) found in each of the three districts of the city (Western, Central and Eastern). 

By March 2018, it is expected that each of the action plans created would have been refined and prioritised, with some small seed funding provided by the project for practical interventions and that will serve as a hands-on learning opportunity on community–based DRR.

 

 

 

Standfirst: 

Adriana Allen and Emmanuel Osuteye (University College London, Development Planning Unit)  conducted a series of 2-day Action Planning workshops, in Karonga, Malawi (27-28th July 2017), followed by another in Freetown, Sierra Leone (3-4th  August 2017).

Posted in Uncategorized

Focus on collaborative research: Risk in Informal Settlements Community Knowledge and Policy Action in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Undefined

The AXA research was conducted in partnership with the Centre for Community Initiatives Tanzania (CCI) and the Ardhi University, Tanzania, to investigate the impacts of environmental risks on people living in informal settlements and how to get policy and community action on addressing these risks.

The project recognizes that in order to promote risk reduction and inclusive and accountable planning, local institutions need to have a better understanding of risks and vulnerabilities to which the population in their jurisdiction are exposed to such as every-day and small-scale disasters, such as water-borne illnesses.

Under the Axa programme data was collected from two informal settlements in the city of Dar es Salaam’s, Bonde La Mpunga (in the Msasani Ward) and Mtambani (in the  Vingunguti ward), working closely with community residents, the leadership at the sub-ward (“Mtaa”) and the  Federation of the Urban Poor that are active in both areas.

At the end of June 2017, a 3-day Action Planning workshop was organized to bring together the researchers from CCI and Ardhi University, community leaders and residents, as well as external stakeholders from the Department of Disaster Management, World Bank Tanzania Office, Municipal officials and other technical experts. Here, Urban ARK colleagues contributed insights from fieldwork findings to date regarding governance of disaster risk in Dar es Salaam and additional relevant findings.

The workshop was useful to discuss the findings from the data collection which was done using the GNDR ‘Action at the Frontline” methodology, which Urban ARK has also been engaging with. This confirmed the range of threats that community residents are exposed to, as well as highlighting coping mechanisms and what has already been done (by both the community and external support agencies), and ranking the community priorities for outstanding actions that are needed.

The workshops created lively discussion, and led to the development of a list of short-term and long-term priority action points about what measurements should be used to show the realities of risks low-income people face in a way that is practical and straightforward so policy-makers can take action.  Communication channels (both existing and new innovative channels) that have potential for leveraging community voices to be fed into policy formulation were also discussed.

This project is solely funded by the AXA Research Fund (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/research/risk-in-informal-set... )

 

 

 

Standfirst: 

In June 2017 a collaboration was initiated between the AXA Research funded project “Risk in Informal Settlements - Community Knowledge and Policy Action” and Urban ARK's Work Package 3 (led by Mark Pelling and Hayley Leck, King’s College London) to facilitate a strategic action planning process in the light of research findings. The AXA project is led by Urban ARK consortium members Cassidy Johnson and Emmanuel Osuteye, Development Planning Unit at University College London.  

Posted in Uncategorized

Focus on collaborative research: Risk in Informal Settlements Community Knowledge and Policy Action in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Undefined

The AXA research was conducted in partnership with the Centre for Community Initiatives Tanzania (CCI) and the Ardhi University, Tanzania, to investigate the impacts of environmental risks on people living in informal settlements and how to get policy and community action on addressing these risks.

The project recognizes that in order to promote risk reduction and inclusive and accountable planning, local institutions need to have a better understanding of risks and vulnerabilities to which the population in their jurisdiction are exposed to such as every-day and small-scale disasters, such as water-borne illnesses.

Under the Axa programme data was collected from two informal settlements in the city of Dar es Salaam’s, Bonde La Mpunga (in the Msasani Ward) and Mtambani (in the  Vingunguti ward), working closely with community residents, the leadership at the sub-ward (“Mtaa”) and the  Federation of the Urban Poor that are active in both areas.

At the end of June 2017, a 3-day Action Planning workshop was organized to bring together the researchers from CCI and Ardhi University, community leaders and residents, as well as external stakeholders from the Department of Disaster Management, World Bank Tanzania Office, Municipal officials and other technical experts. Here, Urban ARK colleagues contributed insights from fieldwork findings to date regarding governance of disaster risk in Dar es Salaam and additional relevant findings.

The workshop was useful to discuss the findings from the data collection which was done using the GNDR ‘Action at the Frontline” methodology, which Urban ARK has also been engaging with. This confirmed the range of threats that community residents are exposed to, as well as highlighting coping mechanisms and what has already been done (by both the community and external support agencies), and ranking the community priorities for outstanding actions that are needed.

The workshops created lively discussion, and led to the development of a list of short-term and long-term priority action points about what measurements should be used to show the realities of risks low-income people face in a way that is practical and straightforward so policy-makers can take action.  Communication channels (both existing and new innovative channels) that have potential for leveraging community voices to be fed into policy formulation were also discussed.

This project is solely funded by the AXA Research Fund (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/research/risk-in-informal-set... )

 

 

 

Standfirst: 

In June 2017 a collaboration was initiated between the AXA Research funded project “Risk in Informal Settlements - Community Knowledge and Policy Action” and Urban ARK's Work Package 3 (led by Mark Pelling and Hayley Leck, King’s College London) to facilitate a strategic action planning process in the light of research findings. The AXA project is led by Urban ARK consortium members Cassidy Johnson and Emmanuel Osuteye, Development Planning Unit at University College London.  

Posted in Uncategorized

Focus on collaborative research: Risk in Informal Settlements Community Knowledge and Policy Action in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Undefined

The AXA research was conducted in partnership with the Centre for Community Initiatives Tanzania (CCI) and the Ardhi University, Tanzania, to investigate the impacts of environmental risks on people living in informal settlements and how to get policy and community action on addressing these risks.

The project recognizes that in order to promote risk reduction and inclusive and accountable planning, local institutions need to have a better understanding of risks and vulnerabilities to which the population in their jurisdiction are exposed to such as every-day and small-scale disasters, such as water-borne illnesses.

Under the Axa programme data was collected from two informal settlements in the city of Dar es Salaam’s, Bonde La Mpunga (in the Msasani Ward) and Mtambani (in the  Vingunguti ward), working closely with community residents, the leadership at the sub-ward (“Mtaa”) and the  Federation of the Urban Poor that are active in both areas.

At the end of June 2017, a 3-day Action Planning workshop was organized to bring together the researchers from CCI and Ardhi University, community leaders and residents, as well as external stakeholders from the Department of Disaster Management, World Bank Tanzania Office, Municipal officials and other technical experts. Here, Urban ARK colleagues contributed insights from fieldwork findings to date regarding governance of disaster risk in Dar es Salaam and additional relevant findings.

The workshop was useful to discuss the findings from the data collection which was done using the GNDR ‘Action at the Frontline” methodology, which Urban ARK has also been engaging with. This confirmed the range of threats that community residents are exposed to, as well as highlighting coping mechanisms and what has already been done (by both the community and external support agencies), and ranking the community priorities for outstanding actions that are needed.

The workshops created lively discussion, and led to the development of a list of short-term and long-term priority action points about what measurements should be used to show the realities of risks low-income people face in a way that is practical and straightforward so policy-makers can take action.  Communication channels (both existing and new innovative channels) that have potential for leveraging community voices to be fed into policy formulation were also discussed.

This project is solely funded by the AXA Research Fund (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/research/risk-in-informal-set... )

 

 

 

Standfirst: 

In June 2017 a collaboration was initiated between the AXA Research funded project “Risk in Informal Settlements - Community Knowledge and Policy Action” and Urban ARK's Work Package 3 (led by Mark Pelling and Hayley Leck, King’s College London) to facilitate a strategic action planning process in the light of research findings. The AXA project is led by Urban ARK consortium members Cassidy Johnson and Emmanuel Osuteye, Development Planning Unit at University College London.  

Posted in Uncategorized

How to build resilience during emergency response: piloting the Christian Aid and King’s led START DEPP Linking Preparedness and Response in Emergency Contexts (LPRR) approach in Kenya

By Becky Murphy @Christian Aid and @Kings College London

geogblog

Image; © Becky Murphy, Christian Aid

“I am because we are” (John Mbiti)

It’s mid-October in rural north Kenya. The LPRR project has travelled to Marsabit, Kenya, near the Ethiopia boarder. Here, the LPRR project implements a six-day co-developed workshop to put the LPRR approach into practice alongside both Christian Aid and CAFOD’s local partners (PACIDA, MIONET, CIFA and Caritas Maralal, Marsabit and Isiolo). After two years of research and work, the team were very excited to start putting findings into practice in Kenya and compare how it might work with the pilot conducted in Myanmar in August. Continue reading

Student Profile: Emilia Sandoghdar

Emilia is the newly elected student rep for Year 1 BA Geographers.

I chose Geography because it explains the contemporary world through every possible lens. It connects the threads between the systems and spaces we interact in and lets me be a part of our global network. I am particularly interested in the cultures of urban spaces; how the city we live in can shape our identity and how we shape the city. Geography provides me with a broad palette of topics that are pressing issues right now, like the geopolitics at the Arctic or China’s growing hegemony in African countries. Continue reading

How to build resilience during emergency response: piloting the START DEPP Linking Preparedness and Response in Emergency Contexts (LPRR) approach in Myanmar

How to build resilience during emergency response: piloting the START DEPP Linking Preparedness and Response in Emergency Contexts (LPRR) approach in Myanmar

By Becky Murphy @Christian Aid and @Kings College London

becky-murphy-blog

Image: Credit to Christian Aid and their Rohingya Crises Appeal: https://www.christianaid.org.uk/emergencies

On Friday 18 August 2017, the LPRR team headed out to Myanmar to launch a new, practical approach to localisation.

After two years of research and work, the team were very excited to start putting findings into practice in both Kayin and Rakhine in Myanmar. However, we were also a little wary, knowing that we were not going into the easiest of contexts to roll out a new approach to humanitarian response. Continue reading