Four Ways to Boost Wellbeing during Placement

Managing competing priorities is certainly something that all university students can identify with.  As the semester gains momentum, with academic work, social events, extra-curricular commitments and everyday tasks such as laundry and financial management, it can feel like a lot of plates are spinning in the air!  When we’re busy, especially with deadlines and placements, it can be so tempting to let some of our self-care activities drop to recoup some time for time-sensitive commitments.  However, if we want to be at our best, perform at our best and stay well in the long-term, it’s wise to prioritise our self-care.  This week, one of our Positive Peers share their four tips for wellbeing on placement.

As a disclaimer: I’m not a wellbeing expert, I’m a fourth year medical student who is making it up as I go along. . . but bear with me here, because in this blog I want to show you (and reassure myself!) that that’s okay, because maintaining wellbeing is something to be continually striving for and adapting in order to cope with what’s thrown at you.

When I began clinical medicine last year, being on placement myself and having conversations with friends about our experiences made me realise that although we were mostly enjoying ourselves and loved sharing anecdotes, it is also a strange and often difficult time. I became involved with Positive Peers because I wondered if anyone else felt the same way, and because I firmly believe that it makes no sense to follow a career aiming to improve other people’s wellbeing if you don’t think about how to maintain your own. As I enter my fourth year, the distance from the hospital I’m on placement at from the central London campuses means I am having to adapt how I am involved. . . welcome to this blog!

The reality is that being on placement has changed how much I can be involved in things that I love doing and has affected my wellbeing. As well as being a Positive Peer, all the other clubs, sports team, societies and events which provided such a well- needed break from medicine for me (and were a big part of what I enjoyed about university in the first three years!) are also more difficult to get to and commit to being involved with regularly. Long travel times and long days (hello, waking up at 6am, 45 minute journey and 7.45am start!), as well as the usual nasty transition back to university, learning things after a lovely lazy summer, the shortening days and cold weather have left me feeling exhausted, and really needing to focus on things I do to look after myself. Here are just a few:

download1. Reading! I would love this whole blog post to be about what I’ve been reading and recommending books I love and why*… suffice to say reading is something that always makes me feel better and there’s nothing better than having a good book to look forward to finishing at home.

images2. Good food cheers me up, and experimenting with new dishes and ingredients always feels like an accomplishment. Dedicating some time to cooking a meal is relaxing, as it requires your entire focus and gives you a tangible end result! Meal prep is an over-discussed phenomenon on the internet… but it cannot be denied that pulling out yummy, pre-made lunches out of the fridge is so satisfying!!

mloda-kobieta-cwiczenia-fitness3. I never fail to be amazed how much better going for a run or a gym class makes me feel…even if finding the motivation to do it is a huge struggle, it is worth it every single time!     (If you’re interested in the benefits of exercise, this is a great read: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/oct/03/exercise-depression-disease-death-sit-less-move-more)

people-2567915_960_7204. Last and most important: get things in perspective! When I’m feeling overwhelmed I find that it’s nearly always helpful to talk to someone else. I’m incredibly lucky to have an amazing group of friends; one friend in particular never fails to cheer me up over a good phone chat. I can moan a little about my day, but conclude that it’s really just “all the usual stuff”, and reassuring her that actually I’m fine made me realise I’m fine too.

Do you find any of these things helpful? What changes have placement made to you, and how have these affected your wellbeing? I would love to know whether any of this strikes a chord with you; questions, comments, thoughts and suggestions are all so welcome! Maybe one of your comments will even inspire my next blog post J

*Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: 10/10

 This post was written by a Positive Peer. The Positive Peers are health students who support other health students through wellbeing initiatives. Find out more about them here!

Cooking 101 – How not to live off instant noodles

If you’re new to cooking and just finding your feet in the kitchen, you’re not alone!  Student Money Mentor Claire has been there too and is keen to dispense some words of wisdom gleaned through her own culinary trials, errors and triumphs. 

cooking

Cooking – you either love it or hate it. Some people can add a pinch of salt and a touch of spice to meals with their eyes closed. They can tell what a dish needs just by smelling it and their desserts are to die for.

I, sadly, am not one of those people.

I am the kind of person who burns toast and then smears it with a thick layer of butter and jam to disguise the charcoal aftertaste. I either cook so much rice it lasts for a week and a half, or so little I need to cook a second batch because I can’t get the proportions right.

I have eaten porridge for breakfast and for lunch (Tip: Don’t do that, it is incredibly depressing) and chewed my way though pasta which I convinced myself was ‘al dente’ rather than undercooked.

This article is for people like me who are not gifted in the kitchen, but want to try. Please learn from my mistakes. Only once have I given myself food poisoning, but that was one time too many and now I have pledged to get better.

1. Measure things out

If you have room for a little electronic scale in your kitchen, buy one. They are pretty cheap and will save you guessing what 50 grams of grains looks like (although that is a fun game. If you are bored and want to try it, be my guest. The problem afterwards is trying to get the stuff back into the packet without spilling it over the kitchen floor)

If you don’t want to buy a scale, use proportions. Measure things out in tea cups and get the ratio right. Most recipes will have weights and cups so pick the one with applies to you.

young man at home kitchen in cook apron desperate in cooking stress

2. Follow those recipes

If you are making something and it looks a bit dry, trust it. Once you start thinking you are better than Nigella Lawson and varying the ingredients, it will be a recipe for disaster – literally. These people have tried and tested what they have written, so have faith in the food gods and simply obey their instructions.

3. Never underestimate a microwave

It can reheat, defrost and cook a wealth of things. There are several websites and videos with microwave hacks (see links below).  Not only do you save time and money, but it is a very easy way to cook veg which can be part of your 5 a day.

Also, it means you can freeze leftovers for another day, decreasing food waste. Many things can be frozen, including bread, fresh berries for smoothies, curries and fresh meats. However, do not freeze veg with a high water content (e.g. lettuce) or creamy things like cheese and yoghurt (unless you have followed a recipe for making your own ice cream). The curds will separate and it will taste very crystal-y (yes, I have tried it).

Also, when defrosting things, use a low setting for a longer time, don’t be impatient like me and whack it on high thinking it will speed things up. The outside gets hot and the inside is frozen. It tastes really strange.

HEALTH WARNING: Defrost everything thoroughly. Please.

http://firstwefeast.com/eat/2013/12/microwave-hacks-tricks-recipes/

http://www.oola.com/cooking-tips/8873/17-crazy-fast-and-easy-microwave-snack-hacks-muglife/

4. Cook together

Group of friends cheerfully cooking

If you want to cook a nice meal, get together with your flatmates and prepare it. Not only is it more fun, but you are more likely to do things better when you know there are other people, as you really don’t want to poison your friends. Plus, you may learn a few tips from them.

 

 5. Start simple

noodles

It is not a sin to use bottled sauces, in fact, I would encourage it! It saves time and you don’t have to buy a hundred different spices. It is not cheating just because it is easy. Also, pick simple recipes at the start, or get advice from family who have been cooking for decades. Before you go to uni, watch them prepare a meal and help out, so you can see what needs to be done. No one is expecting Michelin star food quite yet, but you have to start somewhere.

So those are my tips for the kitchen..  Instant noodles are acceptable once in a while, but I know you can do better than that.

One ultimate conundrum though is this: no matter how hard you try, your food will never quite taste as good as your mum’s. That extra pinch of love is something which you can’t buy in the shops

Welcome and Savour the Moment

Whether this is your first experience of higher education, or you’re returning after a break from study, the start of the academic year is an exciting time and it can sometimes seem a bit overwhelming!  With so much to take in, from finding your way around campus (Bonus points if you’re based at Strand and have managed to locate the Chesham building, which is notoriously difficult to find!), to navigating the transport system if you’re new to London, to establishing your social group; it can all go by in a bit of a blur.

rush

People often talk about ‘being in the moment’ and, whilst this can sound a little cringe-worthy to some, it’s worth unpacking what this can look and feel like and how it can help.   When we’re rushing around, trying to get ourselves organised and fit in our many different commitments, we often don’t even notice the world around us, much less what’s going on for us internally.   Sometimes, it’s important to slow down and check in with ourselves, notice how we’re feeling in our bodies and minds, ask ourselves which aspects of our lives feel fulfilled and which might need a little tlc.  And who can we reach out to so we can achieve that?  Taking notice of the external world, too, can help anchor us in the present, rather than being caught up in thinking about the past or stressing about the future.

This was probably best summed up at one of our Welcome to King’s panel discussions. When one of our new students asked the very helpful question “What one piece of advice would you give to us at this point in time?”, there were many useful suggestions, including this point from the Counselling Service; “Just breathe!”.

Savour the Moment Challenge

  • Take some quiet time to yourself to check in and notice how you’re feeling at the moment. Use our wheel of wellbeing tool to help you do this.  Think about each segment and rate your wellbeing out of 10 to identify your areas of strength and development.   If things are a little out of kilter, what could you do to restore that balance?  Perhaps our wellbeing toolbox can provide a good starting point.
  • Identify some times and places to carve out some quiet time for reflection on your own wellbeing. Spent 20 minutes reading, meditating, or just sitting with your own thoughts.  Why not try out the following spaces and see how they feel:
  • Wellbeing room, Maughan Library
  • Chaplaincy rooms – there’s one on each campus
  • Strand and Guy’s chapels
  • Try out our 20 minute vinyasa flow yoga tasters
  • Try a Be Active yoga class
  • Check out the mindfulness sessions run on a weekly basis during term time by the Chaplaincy. Click your campus to find out where and when.view over thames small
  • Take notice of and really savour three things a day that give you pleasure as a starting point. Use your senses to guide you. Was it a beautiful view over the Thames, your favourite song or podcast on the way to lectures, the smell of your shower gel, the taste of your morning coffee, the feeling of a cool breeze?  Sometimes it’s the small things that ground us and bring us back to the present to take us out of our racing thoughts.

For a recap of the different support services available on campus, check out Tuesday’s ‘Welcome and Never Stop Learning’ post

 

Welcome and Invest in Relationships

KCL Enrol web banner 685x280

Feeling nervous about building new social connections? Don’t stress, you won’t be the only one!  It’s daunting to find yourself in a new environment, potentially without the friends and family who’ve been your anchor points over the last years close by and this is something that many new students are experiencing.  It’s worth remembering at this point that you’re entering into a community of almost 30,000 students from over 150 countries and are perfectly poised to meet a new and diverse range of people who could become friends for life.  That’s pretty special.

Invest in Relationships Challenge: Accommodation

So, how can you start to build a social network?  If you’re in uni accommodation, that’s a good place to start. Even if you don’t end up being close friends, it’s still better to be on first name and friendly terms in a convivial atmosphere than passing ships in the corridor.  That said, have a look at some of these challenges below and don’t forget to buy and print your NUS card at the Welcome Fair to take advantages of student discounts while you socialise:

  • Knock and introduce. Take a deep breath and go and knock on the doors of everyone around you in halls.  Say ‘hi’, introduce yourself and, if you get a good vibe, see if they fancy meeting up for coffee/going to an event together such as our Welcome Marquee takeovers on the 21st at Strand (10am-7.30pm) and the 22nd at Guy’s (10am-3pm).

Wilmington DE © @timsavageYou just never know if the person behind the next door will turn out to be a great friend.  In any case, we bet it won’t be as scary as knocking on these doors!

  • The communal meal. Are you in accommodation with a shared kitchen?  Why not get everyone together for some chips and dips and drinks, or a meal if you’re feeling adventurous and get to know each other.  Don’t worry if your culinary skills aren’t up to much just yet; it’s all a learning process and many a uni friendship has been forged over experimental meals in the communal kitchen!

food small Lacking in the culinary skills department? No need to worry!  You won’t be alone!

  • Keep saying ‘hi’. Cut your flatmates a little slack if they don’t initially appear all that friendly.  They may just be taking a little while to acclimatise, so don’t write them off.  Keep being friendly and offer them the chance to come out of their shell when they’re ready.

Don’t forget that your Residence Associates (RA’s) will be putting on social and community-building events throughout the year in your halls – the perfect opportunity to get to know your new neighbours.

Trying new activities

Uni is the perfect time to try out new activities and from bhangra to Dr.  Who, tea drinking, to social justice, there is a KCLSU society for absolutely everyone. If you’re a bit nervous about going, just remember that this is the time of year when most new members join, so you’ll be in the same boat as a lot of other students.  You’ll come across societies recruiting at the Welcome Fair and around campus – they want you there!  And don’t be afraid to try something new.  If you find it’s not for you, you haven’t lost out, but you may just awaken a hitherto undiscovered passion or talent.

fencing

Who’s to know what new passions and talents might be unleashed at the KCLSU Welcome Fair!

Aside from societies, don’t forget that there are other social events all year round within your academic departments, halls and Student Services.   Anyone staying in London over the winter holiday period can also make use of the Global Lounge provided by International Advice.

For a weekly get-together in an informal and friendly environment, why not check out the chaplaincy international lunch, running on each campus every week, aimed at bringing together international and home students of all faiths and none.  Whatever your faith background and nationality, you can be assured of a warm welcome.  Whoever said there was no such thing as a free lunch was very much mistaken!

Keep investing

Amidst the hubbub of freshers’ week and finding your feet with balancing academic work with social time, take some time out to reflect on your support network before KCL. Who in your life do you truly value; which relationships mean the world to you, are supportive and a force for positivity in your life?  Once you’ve reflected; whether this be friends, family, significant other, think about how you can continue to invest in these relationships even if there may be distance between you.

clasped hands

9f84f38168542230d3d27c1e1b466bfdIt’s a common thing to worry about how a significant life change like going to uni might affect the dynamics of our relationships, but with Skype, WhatsApp, snapchat and student travel discounts, you needn’t feel far removed.  You can actually have the best of both worlds as you continue to nurture your prior relationships and broaden your social circle at King’s.

Keep Investing Challenge: Reach Out

So, why not reach out now?  Think of your super 5 supporters, who you know always have your back and write them down.  Send them all a card to let them know you’re thinking of them, drop them a text or a WhatsApp message and let them know how you’re getting on.

Welcome and Keep Moving

Wondering how to keep fit and active during your time at KCL?  You might already have found a sport or activity that you love with a passion.  If so, that’s great!  You’ll almost certainly find a club or society where you can get involved at your comfort level.  If not, no worries!  It’s the perfect opportunity to experiment and find an activity to suit your level and approach and you can even set up your own society if it doesn’t already exist.  Read on for a bit of guidance and a few fun challenges to help you get moving at King’s.

Active KCL – Take Advantage!

Check out the wide variety of sports and movement-based activities on offer.  Whether you’re a competitive athlete or just looking for a way to keep moving with some fun activities in an informal setting, there’s something for everyone at KCL.

You can choose from club sport on the KCL Sport website, the gym, the many KCLSU sports societies and don’t forget Be Active; KCL’s social sport programme.  At only £25 for the year (free if you’re in halls) it’s a bargain and has something to bring out the inner active side of even the most reluctant sportspeople among you!

 woman stretching small

No need to suffer through workouts you  don’t enjoy!

The new Active Wellness scheme is also there to support students experiencing mental health difficulties to implement a health and fitness programme to help optimise physical and mental wellbeing.

Keep Active Challenge: London on Foot

walking feet small

Tempting as it may be to jump on the Underground to get around, take advantage of the autumn weather to scope out the local area around your accommodation and campus on foot.  Go exploring with some people from your halls or course and identify some nice cafes, pubs or eateries to unwind after lectures. Don’t forget to check if you get a student discount!

Discover some of London’s many parks and green spaces and maybe arrange to walk to campus a couple of days a week (weather permitting!) to kick-start your day with some fresh air and gentle exercise.  You could even book a free walking tour with Free Tours by Foot with some new acquaintances and get to know the city and your fellow students at the same time.

Keep Active Challenge: Being Healthy and Active Your Way

Take 10 minutes to peruse the vast array of sports and activities on offer.  Find one that suits you, your fitness level and approach to exercise and give it a go!

You might also like to check out our very own Wellbeing Coach Wilna’s blog post about her journey to  fitness and marathon running and the benefits it’s brought to her physical and mental health here!

Wilna running Wellbeing Coach Wilna getting into the running zone!

 

 

University Mental Health Day 2017 – Why I Run

We hope you are looking forward to University Mental Health Day tomorrow as much as we are! This year, the theme is ‘active mental health’ and our Wellbeing Coach Wilna Gracias ,who is organising this year’s event, was keen to reflect on the benefits that her passion for running has brought to her own physical and mental health.  To take part in UMHD 2017 and #moveit4mentalhealth, check out the timetable of events here.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Wilna running Why I Run – Wilna Gracias (Wellbeing Coach)

If you would have told the 15 year old me that the older me would be a marathoner, I would have laughed in your face.

Back then I was your average overweight teen that spent most of her time in front of a TV and/or on the couch doing homework.   In an effort to feel good about myself, I tried all the fad diets and extreme weight loss techniques out there (remember Taebo and sweat suits).  However, I failed after each attempt and each time was left feeling powerless.  I turned to food to soothe these feelings and hence added to the stress.

Fast forward to 2010. I’m living in New York City working as a social worker, and overall, feeling pretty accomplished.  They say if you can make it in New York you can make it anywhere and to the outside world, I had made it. With two degrees under my belt and a growing career, I had it all.  Except for that feeling of failure and powerlessness that was associated with being overweight.  It crept up when I looked in the mirror, when I went shopping for clothes, and even when I made choices about what to eat.  I could no longer deny it or cover it up-I was unhappy and uncomfortable in my own skin.  It was time to do something.  I chose to RUN.

UMHD

 

I ran my first half-marathon in April of 2010 and haven’t stopped running since.  I’ve run over 9 half-marathons in 2 different countries (US and UK). I have also run 4 marathons with Team for Kids, including this year’s Virgin Money London Marathon just last week.  Team for Kids is a group of adult runners from around the world who add meaning to their miles by raising funds for New York Road Runner’s Youth and Community Services programmes. The funds raise provide low cost-health and fitness programs to kids who would otherwise have little or no access to regular physical activity.  These programmes serve over 200,000 children in more 1,000 schools each year.

Not only have I shed the unwanted pounds and poor body image, I have re-gained control of my body, health, and life.  So when I’m asked why I run, the truth is that it reminds me that I’m EMPOWERED.  Running reminds me that I have the power to change my life.  Running reminds me that power is believing in yourself and working towards your goals.  Most importantly, running reminds me that power is not something you keep to yourself, but share with others.  Thus far, I have raised over $6,000 for Team for Kids and hope to continue to do so in the years to come.  I want to share to the gift of running with as many people as possible.  It has changed my life and I know it can change others’ lives as well.

 

New Year New Start with King’s Wellbeing

New Year New Start: Build your vision for 2017

 Welcome back to King’s and Happy New Year!  As we step into 2017, our thoughts might be turning to academic and personal goals for the coming months.  Sometimes, we can be tempted to set ourselves lofty targets that leave us more stressed than motivated and feeling disappointed when we don’t meet our own expectations.  How many of us have banished all treats, signed up to the gym and pledged to spend an inordinate number of hours in the library, only to find ourselves binge-watching our favourite Netflix series, unhealthy snacks in hand a couple of weeks later?  We’ve all been there! And that’s OK.

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King’s Wellbeing takes a different approach.  Firstly, we want you to celebrate your achievements in 2016.  What went well? What are you proud of? Take a moment to reflect.  And what did you learn?  Even if everything didn’t go quite to plan, there is always something that we can take forward into the future to help us grow and we can feel proud of ourselves for making it through a difficult period.

Next week marks the start of our New Year New Start campaign and there’s a reason why we don’t subscribe to the ‘New Year New You’ motto that emerges every January.  We don’t believe that there’s anything wrong with the old you! We believe in the resourcefulness of all our students to build on the foundation that is already there and become the best version of themselves.

So, let’s not focus exclusively on what we want to change and dwell too much on the negatives.  Let’s look at where we want to be, what we want to achieve, and see 2017 as a year of new possibilities.  Try and focus on manageable and tangible goals as part of an incremental process of positive growth.  Don’t forget to recognise your successes along the way, however small, and remember to take care of your wellbeing!  If you’re struggling to identify your goals and how to get there and would benefit from some support, why not make an appointment for some wellbeing coaching?

 Don’t forget also that in addition to King’s Wellbeing, there are a multitude of services on campus to help you attain your academic, personal and health and fitness goals. Check out Study Skills, English Language Centre, King’s Sport and Be Active as a starting point.  If you’re trying to connect more with the KCL community, have a look at the KCLSU societies – from film and literature, to hot chocolate, to circus skills, there’s truly something for everyone! Looking for a friendly face and a listening ear to talk things over in confidence?  You can always get in touch with the KCL peer supporters or the Chaplaincy.  

For New Year New Start, King’s Wellbeing will also be around on every campus over the next two weeks to help you to get off on the right foot and provide a space to reflect on how to boost your wellbeing.  Join us for interactive stalls, relaxation workshops, yoga and more! New Year New Start needn’t be daunting and can even be fun!

 

Fight the Fads – Happy Healthy New Year!

Happy New Year and welcome back to the new term at King’s!  King’s Wellbeing hopes that 2017 will be a happy and fulfilling year for you and is here, as always, to help you reach your academic and personal goals. With the beginning of a new year often bringing resolutions for positive change, Fight the Fads reflect on how to aim for a healthy approach to food without resorting to fad diets.

With 2017 now upon us, it’s hard to not be sucked into that ‘New Year, New You’ mindset. It doesn’t help that the media (generally) makes us feel guilty about indulging ourselves a little over the festive period. But before you get conned into the latest celebrity-endorsed fads and crash diets, read these tips from the nutrition experts for a happy, healthy and fad-free new year. Selection of healthy food on rustic wooden background

We have one top-tip: ditch the diets! You may be surprised to learn that the majority of dieters regain the weight (and often more) that they worked so hard to lose. There are a number of proposed reasons for this high rate of weight regain, and it involves complex interactions between our biology (homeostatic system), the environment and our behaviour- all of which are influenced by genetics. You can read more about the research into this area by following this link.

 Have a Happy & Healthy 2017: Top Tips from the Nutrition Experts

“Banish guilt from your vocabulary. Set goals for what you want to achieve throughout 2017. Being healthy is not just for January.”

 Annemarie Knight, RD

“Focus new year resolutions on HEALTH not just weight e.g. physical activity or alcohol intake.”

Jessica Lockley, RD2b

“Everyone overeats when they’re tired, bored, down or stressed – it’s biology! Take the time to understand WHY you eat!”

Sophie Medlin, RD

“Walk/cycle to and from work.”

Dr Nicola Guess, RD

“Think nutrition not just calories when making food choices. Learn to cook/prepare your food. Make time to plan/eat/enjoy meals.”

Sinéad Curran, RD

“Ask for tupperware as gifts and take a packed lunch- only takes 10 minutes, saves you £s, and is often healthier!”

Chrissie Brown, RD2b

“Focus on getting the basics right – vegetables, highly processed food, movement & alcohol within guidelines!”

Helen West, RD

My “diet” vs. healthy eating radar:

X Cuts out an entire food group X

√ More fresh, less processed 

Dr Megan Rossi, RD

“Food wise: eat low processed foods as much as possible. Be mindful: Feed your emotional needs with something other than food.”

Mike Sweeney, RD

“Smash your scale and set positive health goals instead.”

Rebecca Scritchfield, RD

“Plan healthy meals in advance and get uses to writing shopping lists. Reduces waste and takes the stress out of thinking what to cook.”

Susan Short, RD

“Don’t buy out of habit, take extra time when food shopping to look at all fruit & veg stocked. What can you add to your diet?”

Clare Cremin, RD

“Have lots of healthy snacks on hand to avoid munching on biscuits etc.”

Maeve Hanan, RD

“For those of us who like meat, but know eating too much is unhealthy & unsustainable- Partial substitution of meat by pulses.”

Dr Terri Grassby, Lecturer in Food Sciences

“Downsize don’t Supersize…the problem may not be what you eat but how much! #portioncontrol

Leah McGrath, RD

 

Crafternooning for Mind and Winter Wellbeing Support

A great time was had by all recently at our two winter wellbeing crafternoon events. Of particular note was the creativity unleashed on our gingerbread figures, resulting in oompa loompas, a gingerbread Santa and some particularly snazzy outfits involving brightly-coloured sprinkles! However, underlying the festive snacks, biscuit decorating and general merriment was a serious message. The purpose of the event was to fund-raise and raise awareness of the mental health charity Mind.

crafternoon

Some of our wonderful creations at our Mind crafternoon event!

Since 1946, Mind, originally the National Association for Mental Health, has been working to provide empowering advice and support to anyone experiencing a mental health problem and to nurture a culture of support and respect. We loved the idea of a crafternoon for all that it represented; a chance to take a break from study, come together to strengthen existing connections and make new ones and open up dialogues around mental health, not to mention having fun!

Mind, and indeed KCL, recognise that for a variety of reasons, the holiday season can be a time of year that provokes strong emotions and may prove a source of additional stress and strain.  For this reason, it’s important that we take care of ourselves, are kind to ourselves and each other and know where to turn for support with our wellbeing.  Whatever we’re going through, there is help at hand if we know where to look.

With this in mind, we’ve collated some helpful resources on self-care over the winter and sources of wellbeing and mental health-related support.

  • Winter Wellbeing Guide: Includes fun hints and tips on how to keep each one of the King’s Ways to Wellbeing in check over winter and some organisations to contact if we need help and support over the holiday period.
  • Christmas in London: a summary of what is going on in London, alternative options for Christmas Day and King’s student services over the winter break.
  • KCL Global Lounge: A space at the Waterloo Campus open during the holiday period for KCL students staying in London to come together.  The space will be staffed by student ambassadors and there will be games, light refreshments and films.
  • Global Lounge Facebook Group 
  • Stand Alone Festive Guide, for people experiencing familial estrangement.
  • Kyle’s Blog for Mind on coping with depression and anxiety at Christmas.
  • Mind Infoline: Want to talk about mental health? Mind’s Infoline is there for you.
  • Samaritans provides emotional support 24/7 every day of the year over the phone and is open for face-to-face visits at its central London office throughout the festive season.
  • Sources of assistance or immediate support in the local community 

However you’re spending the holidays, King’s Wellbeing wishes you the very best and will be here for you again with more wellbeing-related events and activities in the New Year.

Fight The Fads – Embrace Frozen and Tinned Fruit and Veg

Healthy eating on a student budget isn’t always easy.  Fortunately, student dietitians Elisabeth, Caroline and Harriet aka Fight The Fads have first hand experience of finding ways to eat well without spending a fortune.  This month, they’re extolling the virtues of frozen and tinned fruit and veg!

Embrace Frozen and Tinned Fruit and Vegetables!

 Fruits and Vegetables are packed full of vitamins and minerals and all-important fibre to keep your gut healthy!

However as students on a bfrozen fruitudget, we all know fresh food is often the most expensive, and it can be tempting to cut back on these items to save money.

Although eating fresh, local produce soon after harvesting is ideal, research has found that there aren’t substantial differences in the nutrient content of tinned /frozen as opposed to fresh fruit and veg: great news for the health-conscious student!

Although certain water-soluble vitamins may be lost during the processing, the extent to which this occurs may be less than the losses occurred during cooking.

Often canned/tinned produce is processed straight after harvesting which prevents oxidation and therefore conserves the nutrient content.