Fight the Fads – Happy Healthy New Year!

Happy New Year and welcome back to the new term at King’s!  King’s Wellbeing hopes that 2017 will be a happy and fulfilling year for you and is here, as always, to help you reach your academic and personal goals. With the beginning of a new year often bringing resolutions for positive change, Fight the Fads reflect on how to aim for a healthy approach to food without resorting to fad diets.

With 2017 now upon us, it’s hard to not be sucked into that ‘New Year, New You’ mindset. It doesn’t help that the media (generally) makes us feel guilty about indulging ourselves a little over the festive period. But before you get conned into the latest celebrity-endorsed fads and crash diets, read these tips from the nutrition experts for a happy, healthy and fad-free new year. Selection of healthy food on rustic wooden background

We have one top-tip: ditch the diets! You may be surprised to learn that the majority of dieters regain the weight (and often more) that they worked so hard to lose. There are a number of proposed reasons for this high rate of weight regain, and it involves complex interactions between our biology (homeostatic system), the environment and our behaviour- all of which are influenced by genetics. You can read more about the research into this area by following this link.

 Have a Happy & Healthy 2017: Top Tips from the Nutrition Experts

“Banish guilt from your vocabulary. Set goals for what you want to achieve throughout 2017. Being healthy is not just for January.”

 Annemarie Knight, RD

“Focus new year resolutions on HEALTH not just weight e.g. physical activity or alcohol intake.”

Jessica Lockley, RD2b

“Everyone overeats when they’re tired, bored, down or stressed – it’s biology! Take the time to understand WHY you eat!”

Sophie Medlin, RD

“Walk/cycle to and from work.”

Dr Nicola Guess, RD

“Think nutrition not just calories when making food choices. Learn to cook/prepare your food. Make time to plan/eat/enjoy meals.”

Sinéad Curran, RD

“Ask for tupperware as gifts and take a packed lunch- only takes 10 minutes, saves you £s, and is often healthier!”

Chrissie Brown, RD2b

“Focus on getting the basics right – vegetables, highly processed food, movement & alcohol within guidelines!”

Helen West, RD

My “diet” vs. healthy eating radar:

X Cuts out an entire food group X

√ More fresh, less processed 

Dr Megan Rossi, RD

“Food wise: eat low processed foods as much as possible. Be mindful: Feed your emotional needs with something other than food.”

Mike Sweeney, RD

“Smash your scale and set positive health goals instead.”

Rebecca Scritchfield, RD

“Plan healthy meals in advance and get uses to writing shopping lists. Reduces waste and takes the stress out of thinking what to cook.”

Susan Short, RD

“Don’t buy out of habit, take extra time when food shopping to look at all fruit & veg stocked. What can you add to your diet?”

Clare Cremin, RD

“Have lots of healthy snacks on hand to avoid munching on biscuits etc.”

Maeve Hanan, RD

“For those of us who like meat, but know eating too much is unhealthy & unsustainable- Partial substitution of meat by pulses.”

Dr Terri Grassby, Lecturer in Food Sciences

“Downsize don’t Supersize…the problem may not be what you eat but how much! #portioncontrol

Leah McGrath, RD

 

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