Second Year Modules

Hey everyone! Last week, I talked a bit about my first year module experiences and set myself on talking about London this week. However, on a second thought, following up from last week and talking about second year modules will be better.

Second year modules are a lot more specific, which is exciting and a bit daunting at the same time. In my opinion, specificity does not trump variety, so there is no problem in picking a range of modules from naval history to an International Relations module, which will let you explore your interests. I’ve opted for variety, which I believe will serve me well when choosing my third year modules and thinking about dissertation.

War & Global Conflict is chiefly a contemporary history module of conflicts around the world from approximately the second half of 20th century. As the time period suggests, these conflicts are studied partly in relation to the greater context of the Cold War. The content is especially captivating as the impacts of many of these events have lingered on until the present day.
Intelligence is an interesting one which you are not likely to find in any other institution as an entire module. A wide range of information is covered from the organizational structure of American intelligence to the why and how’s of major intelligence failures. This module is especially compelling to me given its relevance to present day conflicts.

International Law, Human Rights and Intervention is a new module available to both War Studies and International Relations students. This one hit the jack pot for me as it provides the civilian aspect of War Studies I’d been looking for. The focus shifts from the state to non-state analysis as we cover the influence of the United Nations and international law on conflict.

Strategy is my absolute favourite this year. I had heard amazing things about it, and it hasn’t let me down in the slightest. This module is about the pursuit of politics through military means – for example how the United States developed a nuclear strategy to deal with the Soviet Union or how guerrilla warfare was conducted in Latin America and China to topple capitalist regimes.

That was a brief overview of the modules I’m taking this year – hope it gives you an idea of the scope of options you have for second year. What I’ve found particularly useful when thinking about modules is talking with a couple students from the year above and asking for their opinions about their modules – things may not be the same as they appear on paper and it’s generally good to have some insight from those who’ve had first-hand experience. If you do go with your instincts though, there’s always the chance to change modules in the first few weeks of the term.

Hope you’ve found this information useful and you can expect to read on societies, happenings at King’s and London next week!