Week 9 Meeting Summary

In last weeks meeting we finalised the creative framework of our presentation, deciding that a ficitonalised courtroom would be the main feature of the project. In sharing our ideas from last weeks script writing task, we realised that we would need analyse the courtroom script, and spoke about whether it would be best to provide an integrated analysis or to designate a separate analytical segment.

Since the main objective of our project is now a process of creative writing, we felt that the most streamlined way of approaching this would be to write individually and appraise our work as a group. This weeks meeting was used to make ourselves aware of the variety of stylistic choices we might make. This discussion included whether the courtroom would be a parody of the legal system in order to critique it or whether we opt for a more documentary style, whether we would play the part of our references ‘voices’,  whether we would use audio-visual tools to present witness statements or evidence, and whether we would include our ‘audience-examiners’ in the framework of the presentation in line with immersive political theatre techniques.

While this weeks meeting was more textually thin than some previous ones, I felt that it was no less productive. Finalising the creative framework of our presentation has provided a focus for our individual work, as well precision for our arguments overall.

Next week we plan to think about what route to go down theatrically, and plan to contact performance scholars at kings who have written on the intersection between theatre and law, such as Dr Alan Read, who can provide insight into what a ficitonalised courtroom might look like.

Week 4 Summary (backdated due to technical issues w/ blog)

Through Week 3’s seminar discussion we found that a uniting topic in our areas of interest was the ways in which the identity is socialized in children, leading us to devise our research question: 

Conflict between normative and non-normative identities through childhood. 

The nature of the conflict taken as our focus is therefore between dominant and marginal cultural scripts and narratives. We brainstormed contemporary examples of where this conflict can be identified in order to find a case study for our presentation, and the four possibilities that seemed most appropriate were 

  1. Disney and childhood 
  1. Charlottesville and toxic masculinity 
  1. Genderquake television show 
  1. Mermaids (a charity devoted to helping trans children come into their identity and fund transitioning) 

While this method of brainstorming proved useful in gaining a wide perspective on the possible case studies available to us, in Week 4’s seminar we decided to analyse the applicability of each case study to our relevant major disciplines in order to keep our research succinct. A table comparing the relevance of our case studies can be found here: <https://emckclac-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/personal/k1626863_kcl_ac_uk/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BF04D80EA-9799-41E3-A0D0-B99EF2380EFD%7D&file=List%20of%20case%20studies%20with%20relevance%20to%20discipline.docx&action=default&mobileredirect=true> 

Charlottesville and Mermaids were relevant to all three disciplines making them the forerunners for our research. We decided that since mermaids related to the topic of childhood more, trans childhood should be our primary research area. 

Zack and I attended a talk on the subjectivity of trans children given by Gender Studies scholar Jacob Breslow, titled ‘Troubling Trans Precocity:  Narratives of Trans Childhood and the Temporalities of Sexuation’ which entailed ‘drawing upon media representations of trans children, a court case involving a six-year old trans girl, and narratives of trans childhood’. The talk provided an insight into how children, trans or otherwise, become sites of political normalization at the hands of adults through a process of psychological projection. Zack suggested watching a documentary on Netflix called ‘Growing Up Coy’, which follows the same court case detailed in the talk. 

After streamlining our topic we decided that for Week 5 we would each look at the topic of trans childhood through the lens of our major discipline, looking at trans legislation for politics, international differences in cultural approaches to trans rights for geography, and more normative and identity-based discussions for English.  

Week 4 Summary

Through Week 3’s seminar discussion we found that a uniting topic in our areas of interest was the ways in which the identity is socialized in children, leading us to devise our research question: 

Conflict between normative and non-normative identities through childhood. 

The nature of the conflict taken as our focus is therefore between dominant and marginal cultural scripts and narratives. We brainstormed contemporary examples of where this conflict can be identified in order to find a case study for our presentation, and the four possibilities that seemed most appropriate were 

  1. Disney and childhood 
  1. Charlottesville and toxic masculinity 
  1. Genderquake television show 
  1. Mermaids (a charity devoted to helping trans children come into their identity and fund transitioning) 

While this method of brainstorming proved useful in gaining a wide perspective on the possible case studies available to us, in Week 4’s seminar we decided to analyse the applicability of each case study to our relevant major disciplines in order to keep our research succinct. A table comparing the relevance of our case studies can be found here: <https://emckclac-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/personal/k1626863_kcl_ac_uk/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BF04D80EA-9799-41E3-A0D0-B99EF2380EFD%7D&file=List%20of%20case%20studies%20with%20relevance%20to%20discipline.docx&action=default&mobileredirect=true> 

Charlottesville and Mermaids were relevant to all three disciplines making them the forerunners for our research. We decided that since mermaids related to the topic of childhood more, trans childhood should be our primary research area. 

Zack and I attended a talk on the subjectivity of trans children given by Gender Studies scholar Jacob Breslow, titled ‘Troubling Trans Precocity:  Narratives of Trans Childhood and the Temporalities of Sexuation’ which entailed ‘drawing upon media representations of trans children, a court case involving a six-year old trans girl, and narratives of trans childhood’. The talk provided an insight into how children, trans or otherwise, become sites of political normalization at the hands of adults through a process of psychological projection. Zack suggested watching a documentary on Netflix called ‘Growing Up Coy’, which follows the same court case detailed in the talk. 

After streamlining our topic we decided that for Week 5 we would each look at the topic of trans childhood through the lens of our major discipline, looking at trans legislation for politics, international differences in cultural approaches to trans rights for geography, and more normative and identity-based discussions for English.  

Week 4 Summary

Through Week 3’s seminar discussion we found that a uniting topic in our areas of interest was the ways in which the identity is socialized in children, leading us to devise our research question: 

Conflict between normative and non-normative identities through childhood. 

The nature of the conflict taken as our focus is therefore between dominant and marginal cultural scripts and narratives. We brainstormed contemporary examples of where this conflict can be identified in order to find a case study for our presentation, and the four possibilities that seemed most appropriate were 

  1. Disney and childhood 
  1. Charlottesville and toxic masculinity 
  1. Genderquake television show 
  1. Mermaids (a charity devoted to helping trans children come into their identity and fund transitioning) 

While this method of brainstorming proved useful in gaining a wide perspective on the possible case studies available to us, in Week 4’s seminar we decided to analyse the applicability of each case study to our relevant major disciplines in order to keep our research succinct. A table comparing the relevance of our case studies can be found here: <https://emckclac-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/personal/k1626863_kcl_ac_uk/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BF04D80EA-9799-41E3-A0D0-B99EF2380EFD%7D&file=List%20of%20case%20studies%20with%20relevance%20to%20discipline.docx&action=default&mobileredirect=true> 

Charlottesville and Mermaids were relevant to all three disciplines making them the forerunners for our research. We decided that since mermaids related to the topic of childhood more, trans childhood should be our primary research area. 

Zack and I attended a talk on the subjectivity of trans children given by Gender Studies scholar Jacob Breslow, titled ‘Troubling Trans Precocity:  Narratives of Trans Childhood and the Temporalities of Sexuation’ which entailed ‘drawing upon media representations of trans children, a court case involving a six-year old trans girl, and narratives of trans childhood’. The talk provided an insight into how children, trans or otherwise, become sites of political normalization at the hands of adults through a process of psychological projection. Zack suggested watching a documentary on Netflix called ‘Growing Up Coy’, which follows the same court case detailed in the talk. 

After streamlining our topic we decided that for Week 5 we would each look at the topic of trans childhood through the lens of our major discipline, looking at trans legislation for politics, international differences in cultural approaches to trans rights for geography, and more normative and identity-based discussions for English.  

Week 4 Summary

Through Week 3’s seminar discussion we found that a uniting topic in our areas of interest was the ways in which the identity is socialized in children, leading us to devise our research question:

Conflict between normative and non-normative identities through childhood.

The nature of the conflict taken as our focus is therefore between dominant and marginal cultural scripts and narratives. We brainstormed contemporary examples of where this conflict can be identified in order to find a case study for our presentation, and the four possibilities that seemed most appropriate were

  1. Disney and childhood
  2. Charlottesville and toxic masculinity
  3. Genderquake television show
  4. Mermaids (a charity devoted to helping trans children come into their identity and fund transitioning)

While this method of brainstorming proved useful in gaining a wide perspective on the possible case studies available to us, in Week 4’s seminar we decided to analyse the applicability of each case study to our relevant major disciplines in order to keep our research succinct. A table comparing the relevance of our case studies can be found here: <https://emckclac-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/personal/k1626863_kcl_ac_uk/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BF04D80EA-9799-41E3-A0D0-B99EF2380EFD%7D&file=List%20of%20case%20studies%20with%20relevance%20to%20discipline.docx&action=default&mobileredirect=true>

Charlottesville and Mermaids were relevant to all three disciplines making them the forerunners for our research. We decided that since mermaids related to the topic of childhood more, trans childhood should be our primary research area.

Zack and I attended a talk on the subjectivity of trans children given by Gender Studies scholar Jacob Breslow, titled ‘Troubling Trans Precocity:  Narratives of Trans Childhood and the Temporalities of Sexuation’ which entailed ‘drawing upon media representations of trans children, a court case involving a six-year old trans girl, and narratives of trans childhood’. The talk provided an insight into how children, trans or otherwise, become sites of political normalization at the hands of adults through a process of psychological projection. Zack suggested watching a documentary on Netflix called ‘Growing Up Coy’, which follows the same court case detailed in the talk.

After streamlining our topic we decided that for Week 5 we would each look at the topic of trans childhood through the lens of our major discipline, looking at trans legislation for politics, international differences in cultural approaches to trans rights for geography, and more normative and identity-based discussions for English.

 

Group meeting summary 23/01/2019

Last week we found that our essays were similar in that they all featured the ways in which dominant forces, such as governments, social normalcy or media conflict with marginal selves or communities. Gender was highlighted as a particular focal point within this realisation.

In response to this we decided to search online for different examples of current gender issues in order to decide our case study. These examples included:

  • Trumps decision to exclude trans people from the military (and the legal implications of this)
  • The recent controversy between supporters of the Mermaids organisation and how this highlights conflict between mainstream feminism and the trans community
  • The recent change to the grey-area ‘up-skirting’ laws
  • How toxic masculinity figures within the political issues and the part that toxic masculinity played in the rise of Trump

Following this we had a brief discussion about the comment sections of these articles, and how their anonymous and masculine qualities figure within these issues.

The objective of this weeks session was to make ourselves aware of variety of possible subjects for our presentation. Our task for next week is to write a number of research questions in our own time and share them with each other in order to begin to focus our discussions to one area.

Essay abstract: The ‘objective’ courtroom and the ‘subjective’ elevator: Conflict of narrative surrounding the Brett Kavanaugh hearing

My essay began with the recent Brett Kavanaugh hearing as a case study, detailing how dominant institutions such as legislation, in their attempt to remain objective and rational, fail to encompass valid subjective or emotional narratives. I looked at two recent hearings such as the Anita Hill and William Kennedy Smith cases of 1991 to give examples of the conflict between legislation and the subjectivity of assault victims. I then looked at the elevator that Jeff Flake (one of the senators voting in the Kavanaugh nomination) was cornered in by two activists who shared their own stories of sexual assault, arguing that this represented a necessary creation of democratic space that accommodates emotional subjectivity, accounting for the gaps left by legal institutions. The essay was in this way a look into the conflict both between objective and subjective narrative, and also public and private space.