Planning your Next Steps

Written by Donald Lush, Careers Consultant, King’s Careers & Employability

If you’re a researcher on a fixed-term contract you’ll be aware of how quickly time flies and the pressure on you, while you’re doing your research, to work out what you should do when it ends.

The best advice to prepare for the end of your contract is to reduce the stress by thinking and planning as early as possible. The biggest question you’ll face is whether or not you want to stay in academic research. In the months prior to your contract end date, ask yourself what’s important to you, reflect on your skills and experience and think about the kind of life you want to lead. Very practical issues, such as salary, employer location and job security may be an important part of this consideration.  You may find the careers resources on the Vitae website helpful.

If you’re leaving academia, you’ll find your skills are highly valued by a huge range of employers and there are many opportunities open to you. There’s an excellent resource to help you think here. If you’re researching careers outside academia, everything you could want to know about any job can be found here.

If you’re staying in academia, use that last year of your contract to publish, attend and present at conferences, devote time to research funding opportunities and make sure your personal contacts know about you what you’re looking for.

Whatever you do, it’s a great idea to get yourself out there and make new contacts in your preferred area of work, research information and get your Linked In (and any specialist social media) profiles up to date. Linked In and Twitter can be really useful for both your own career research and making yourself visible to others.

Finally, seek advice and support.  This is especially true for people venturing into new fields or sectors. Your careers service can help with this, with everything from a discussion about your options through to job hunting, application and CV writing and interview preparation.

Why the Use of Fixed-Term Contracts in Research?

Written by Dr Kathy Barrett, University Lead for Research Staff Development, CRSD

According to your responses to the Careers in Research Online Survey in March 2017 92.3% of you are employed by King’s on fixed-term contracts (FTCs), with 61.4% of you holding that contract for between 1 and 3 years.  Most UK universities employ their research staff on FTCs, with an average figure across the UK of 72% employed in this way.

What are the reasons for taking this approach?  King’s policy, and also of most UK universities, is that fixed-term contracts should only be used when there are legitimate reasons for doing so.  Legitimate reasons include when the project expires after a specific term.  As research is typically funded in fixed-term periods and often the grant is not renewed, this will mean that the project will be finite.  It stands to reason then that the contract held by the person carrying out the project will also expire, leading to redundancy regardless of whether it is fixed-term or open.

FTCs do not justify, according to King’s policy, less favourable treatment in comparison to staff on open contracts, so you get the same annual leave, parental leave, sick leave and training development opportunities as your colleagues.  You also get time off towards the end to look for another job, which your colleagues on open contracts would not have.  That sounds like a perk, so what then is negative about the FTC?  If you’re applying for a loan, you might find the finite nature of your contract will detract from your credit-worthiness in the eyes of the lender.  This can be an issue if you want to get a mortgage.

After four years on a fixed-term contract you are legally entitled to be transferred to an open contract, which will give you the option of getting a mortgage.  The only problem is, if your funding runs out you will still be facing redundancy and not have time to look for that new job.

What then is the answer to this conundrum?  If the funders want to support the best research carried out by the best researchers then running the projects for a fixed term makes sense.  It follows then that making the funding open-ended is probably not the answer.  I was at the BME Early Career Researchers Conference at King’s back in April listening to a talk by Chi Onwura, Labour MP for Newcastle Central, in which she said the Labour Party wanted to abolish FTCs for researchers.  When I asked her afterwards how they are planning to do this she asked me for ideas.  Clearly this question also vexes the minds of more influential people than me.  If you have any ideas then feel free to send them to her, and also to me!

King’s guidance on FTCs can be found here.