Top Tips to Impact the World Around You

Written by Nudrat Siddiqui, Research Staff Development Officer 

Further to 67.5% of you expressing an interest in undertaking impact training in the Careers in Research Online Survey (CROS), The Centre for Research Staff Development (CRSD) was delighted to run a workshop on impact on 3rd July. The workshop was a great success and featured sessions delivered by various experts on impact, including Dr Kathy Barrett, University Lead for Research Staff Development, CRSD, Dr Richard Matthewman, Faculty of Natural and Mathematical Sciences Research Manager, Stephen Roberts, Research Engagement Manager, Engagement Services, and Dr Jenni Chambers, Head of Public Engagement with Research, Research Councils UK (RCUK). Participants also had the opportunity to engage with staff from the Science Gallery, Policy Institute, Cultural Institute and Entrepreneurship Institute to find out how these departments could support their impact plans and create and receive feedback on Pathways to Impact Statement templates from staff from the Research Development & Pre-Award Team.

In case you missed the workshop, here are some key points that were raised by speakers:

Why do impact?

How can you have impact and when should you do it?

  • Start thinking about and embedding impact into your research practices early, instead of waiting until you have to apply for funding.
  • The PESTLE analysis and Logic Model are useful tools that can help you consider how your research can have impact.
  • RCUK define impact in 2 ways: Academic Impact and Economic & Social impact
  • Academic impact –explores how your research has impacted your field. Ways to have academic impact include publishing papers, presenting at conferences, running workshops, and being invited to deliver talks.
  • Economic impact – Activities that can lead to economic impact include networking activities, such as knowledge transfer networks, IP and patents, and placements. Exchanging people and knowledge is one of the most powerful ways to have impact, e.g. if you spend a few days working in the environment of the end user.
  • Social Impact – can be generated by having an influence on health (e.g. working with healthcare professionals), policy (e.g. getting involved with professional bodies) cultural sectors (e.g. holding exhibitions), within local communities or raising public awareness and understanding (e.g. public engagement and outreach in schools, museums, etc).
  • Consider the timeline of your impact in terms of the Preparation stage, the Project activities stage, and the Continue stage, which may involve further funding and exploring the contacts you’ve made.

What stakeholders should you engage?

  • Consider the level of interest that different stakeholders will have in your research and the influence they will have in supporting your impact activities.
  • Assess whether your research will have a positive or negative impact.
  • Groups of stakeholders you might want to consider engaging could include patients and healthcare professionals, service providers, funding agencies, NGOs and charities, government and policymakers, environmental practitioners, education practitioners and students.
  • Think about how you prioritise stakeholders with limited time and resources.
  • Ways to engage stakeholders could include face-to-face meetings, through visual materials, or exhibitions.

Tips to write a strong RCUK Pathways to Impact Statement

  • If you plan to apply for RCUK funding in the future, you will have to complete a 2-page template for a Pathways to Impact Statement outlining how your research will have impact.
  • RCUK’s main consideration for Pathways to Impact Statements is that your research should have a significant impact on economy and society.
  • Different funding calls have different requirements for Pathways to Impact Statements and there are council specific guides on how to do this.
  • Pathways to Impact Statements are assessed under peer review.
  • Keep Statements simple but thorough and be project specific rather than generalised.
  • Indicate the audiences and sectors you will be engaging and how you will engage them.
  • Consider how your impact will be evaluated.
  • Don’t hesitate to request money or staff time.
  • Include costs related to proposed impact activities.
  • Choose impact activities that are two-way and that will engage stakeholders.

This workshop is also being developed into an e-learning module which will be available internally on KEATS in the next academic year. Keep an eye out for details of when the module will become available in the Research Staff News newsletter.

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