Despite the PM’s Munich speech, there’s still a long way to go on post-Brexit security cooperation

By Armida van Rij and Benedict Wilkinson

For policymakers on both sides of the Channel, it is clear that it is in everyone’s interest for the UK and the EU to continue to cooperate on security matters post-Brexit. Until this weekend, however, the big question pending was ‘How?’. Theresa May, speaking at the Munich Security Conference on Saturday, attempted to answer this question. Continue reading

The Westminster sexual harassment allegations didn’t arise in a vacuum

By Laura Jones

Women are in the news! To be clear, that means women are the subject of news reports, not reporting the news. Two months ago, it was revealed that just 25% of front-page stories in daily papers are written by women, and those are mostly about the Royals and TV.

But last Friday was Equal Pay Day, the day that women across the country begin working for free relative to their male peers due to the gender pay gap. You can’t move for reporting on the sexual harassment cases in Hollywood and Westminster. And before that? Revelations about the BBC gender pay gap, reports that British cinema’s gender imbalance is worse now than it was in 1913, of gender discrimination at Uber and sexism across Silicon Valley. Continue reading

Life on the margins: Undocumented immigrant abuse in the US

This is the seventh in a series of blogs from the finalists of this year’s Policy Idol competition. These blogs were originally presented as policy pitches at the live final of the competition earlier this year. Policy Idol is an annual competition open to all staff and students at King’s.

By Carlyn Greenfield and Carina Uchida

Undocumented immigration has been a focal point of the Trump administration’s policies and a hot topic in the recent presidential election. In the United States, undocumented immigrants have no right to work, to legal representation or to appeal deportation. These limitations lead them to become vulnerable to exploitation such as human trafficking, as they easily fall under the radar and are silenced through their legal status. Continue reading

The fight against homelessness

This is the sixth in a series of blogs from the finalists of this year’s Policy Idol competition. These blogs were originally presented as policy pitches at the live final of the competition earlier this year. Policy Idol is an annual competition open to all staff and students at King’s.

By Oliver Marks, Katie-Louise Marvin, Paul Ng and Emma Shleifer

Homelessness is around us all the time yet we barely notice it. Many of us prefer to put the problem down as something out of our control. It is time we face the facts: homelessness is getting worse. Since 2010, it has increased by over 30 per cent nationwide. This is largely due to increased housing costs forcing more people to the streets, and the inefficient management of the issue. Continue reading

Non-custodial community programmes for non-violent female criminals in the UK

This is the fifth in a series of blogs from the finalists of this year’s Policy Idol competition. These blogs were originally presented as policy pitches at the live final of the competition earlier this year. Policy Idol is an annual competition open to all staff and students at King’s.

By Sarah Williams and Emma Wynne-Bannister

In the UK, approximately 9,000 women are imprisoned each year for non-violent crimes such as shoplifting, parking fines and non-payment of a TV licence. This includes around 5,000 women who are remanded in custody before being given a non-custodial sentence. A typical confinement is six months or less, a paradoxical situation in which these women are imprisoned just long enough for benefits to cease, but insufficient time to secure alternatives (the rate of official homelessness on discharge from prison sits at almost 40 per cent). As a result, many of these women get caught in a cycle of re-offending and re-imprisonment – a cycle that is costing the UK economy approximately £200 million each year. Continue reading