Is Uber a taxi service? Socio-legal reflections on the ECJ decision and beyond  

Serena Natile – Postdoctoral Researcher at King’s College London and Associate Lecturer at Kent Law School, University of Kent

Just before the holiday break, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) in its first ruling on the gig economy decided that the global digitally-enabled taxi company, Uber, is a transportation and not an information service and can be regulated by Member States (MS). This judgement has raised important questions regarding the regulation and social implications of digital platforms according to EU law and beyond. While the ECJ’s decision created more grounds to protect workers’ rights in the sharing economy and contributed to the debate on the allocation of EU/MS competences within the digital domain, it also offers useful insights to reflect on the social role of digital platforms more generally.

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Call for Papers

 The KSLR EU Law Blog hereby invites you to submit abstracts for blog posts on

 any area of EU law

 (including but not limited to judicial protection, internal market, external relations, financial regulation, data-protection, environmental policies).

Submissions covering any of the following topics are particularly welcome:

  • The future of the EU: reflections and reforms
  • The external dimension of EU policies
  • The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and its application at EU and national level
  • Protecting and enhancing the rule of law in the EU
  • Issues of law or policy of Member States with relevance for the EU

We also invite submissions on:

  • Coverage of EU law-related events
  • Reviews of recently published EU law-related books as well as
  • Recent developments of EU case law

We are looking for 800 – 2000 words articles.

Please refer to our style guidelines.

Please send abstracts or full articles to giulia.gentile@kcl.ac.uk and luigi.lonardo@kcl.ac.uk by 20 February 2018.

We look forward to hearing from you!

The KSLR EU Law Blog Editorial Team

2017 Call for Papers

Dear All,

the KSLR EU Law Blog hereby invites you to submit blogposts in any field of EU law.

We are looking for papers between 1000 and 1500 words focusing on EU law related issues such as the implications of the UK referendum, possible reforms of the EU constitutional framework ad the role of the EU as a global actor.

We also invite submissions on:

  • Coverage of EU law-related events
  • Reviews of recently published EU law-related books as well as
  • Recent developments of EU case law.

Please submit abstracts or articles to giulia.gentile@kcl.ac.uk and giorgia.sangiuolo@kcl.ac.uk.

The deadline for the submission is the 1st of June 2017.

Please refer to our style guidelines.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Giulia Gentile                   Giorgia Sangiuolo

Konstanstina Perifanou    Angel Kaloyanov

 

Europe.think.again – Call for Ideas

Dear All,

The KSLR EU Law Blog is pleased to share with you a EU-related project managed by “Foraus Global”, a Swiss think tank on foreign policy.

In view of the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome establishing the European Economic Community on 25 March 2017, Foraus Global is publishing a short collection of ideas to reform European cooperation.

For more information, please visit the following page: europe.think.again project.

If you are interested in participating or you have further questions, please contact Laura Knopfel (laura.knopfel@kcl.ac.uk). 

We look forward to hearing from you!

The KSLR EU Law Blog editorial team

 

Refusal to refer for a preliminary ruling and a right to a fair trial: Strasbourg court’s position

Agne Limante (MA, PhD) is a Research Fellow at the Law Institute of Lithuania.

The duty of last instance national courts to submit preliminary references to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) is analysed by academics almost exclusively in the light of the Luxembourg Court’s case law. However, the case law of European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) also appears to be relevant in this context. In several instances the ECtHR was asked whether non-referral of preliminary questions to the CJEU constituted a breach of Article 6 ECHR, guaranteeing the right to a fair trial.[1] This post aims at providing some reference in this regard. First, it briefly describes the rules governing the preliminary reference procedure. Then, it analyses the ECtHR’s judgements relevant to this subject. Some conclusions will follow.

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