Corporal Punishment of Children – the Evolutionary Approach of International Law

  I cannot write this article without paying a tribute to Nelson Mandela who I regard as an inspiring human rights advocate. May he rest in peace.     1. Introduction In the past centuries, it was acceptable for adults, predominantly women and slaves, to be corporally punished. This is no longer the case today.… More Corporal Punishment of Children – the Evolutionary Approach of International Law

Hirst v United Kingdom (No.2) : A Danger for Both the UK and Europe

a.  Introduction “No one should be under any doubt – prisoners are not getting the vote under this government.”.[i] There is little uncertainty concerning David Cameron’s stance on the controversial matter of prisoners’ voting rights. The debate is an ethical impasse, evoking strong responses from both sides of the argument. Consequently a wide range of… More Hirst v United Kingdom (No.2) : A Danger for Both the UK and Europe

Big brother’s big brothers: Tort law and privacy in the Internet age

The Internet is a looming challenge for the protection of privacy in England. Although judges have on numerous occasions paid lip service to a right to this human right,[1] English law does not provide for a general tort to privacy.[2] This essay examines, to what extent the three traditional legal torts (defamation, harassment, and trespass… More Big brother’s big brothers: Tort law and privacy in the Internet age

Human Rights: Between Parliamentary Supremacy and the Rule of Law

Introduction: It was not all long ago, November 2012, that 56% of the British population supported the idea of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union.[1] As the Prime Minister, David Cameron, put it in his speech on the EU referendum, some “of this antipathy about Europe in general really relates of course to the… More Human Rights: Between Parliamentary Supremacy and the Rule of Law

Opinion: Is HM Treasury v Ahmed [2010] the most significant human rights case heard by the UK Supreme Court to date?

In January 2010, the Supreme Court gave its judgment on HM Treasury v Ahmed.[1] The case involved the freezing of assets of five men who were suspected of financing terrorism. Given the constitutional significance of this case and its raising of issues related to abuse of executive power, human rights, and international terrorism, it is… More Opinion: Is HM Treasury v Ahmed [2010] the most significant human rights case heard by the UK Supreme Court to date?

Saudi Arabia forbids female athletes to participate in the Olympic Games

Soon the best male and female athletes of the world will walk at the “Parade of the Nations”, at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in London. However, only men will participate in Saudi Arabia’s team, as the country still forbids women from playing sports or making any decisions about their own lives. Despite… More Saudi Arabia forbids female athletes to participate in the Olympic Games

New UN resolution imposes no sanctions on Assad regime

Russia and China have previously vetoed UN resolutions designed to pressure the Syrian government. Although Russia has proposed a new UN resolution for Syria, suggesting an extension of the UN mission for three months, it still fails to impose any sanctions on the Assad regime. The new UN resolution is therefore unlikely to satisfy members… More New UN resolution imposes no sanctions on Assad regime

Systematic use of torture by the Syrian Regime

According to a new report by the Human Rights Watch, Syrian intelligence agencies are systematically using torture, causing around 15,000 deaths since March 2011. The 81-page report includes maps locating detention facilities, video interviews with former detainees and sketches of torture techniques. The New York-based watchdog has called on the United Nation Security Council to… More Systematic use of torture by the Syrian Regime

There is a need for ‘cautious rebalancing’ in terrorism laws

David Anderson QC, the current Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, has released his annual report into the operation of terrorism law in 2011. His report calls for a cautious rebalancing in favour of liberty. He identifies three respects in which change should be considered without diminishing the law’s operational effectiveness. These are the rules governing… More There is a need for ‘cautious rebalancing’ in terrorism laws