PhD students work opportunity with Widening Participation Department

King’s PhD Students, King’s Widening Participation Department needs you!

We are seeking current King’s PhD students who would be interested in supervising an academic piece of work, produced by A-level pupils. We provide full support and a payment of £150 per student completing an assignment with your support. This is a great way to use your experience of university to help pupils in understanding and developing the skills necessary to be successful at a competitive university. In addition, this offers you an opportunity to work with young people and gain experience of supervising, marking and providing feedback on academic work close to undergraduate level.

This role requires you to be available in London for around 10 hours between May and September 2015 to meet with and provide feedback to your tutees. Closing date is 2nd May 2016. All details on how to apply and an application form can be found at the web link below:

https://podio.com/webforms/15360176/1029762

For full details and a job description, please click here

If you have any questions about this role please contact Anne-Marie Henderson in the Widening Participation Department at anne-marie.henderson@kcl.ac.uk

The Access Project

The Access Project matches high-flying graduates with students from disadvantaged areas for weekly one-to-one tutorials, helping the students to boost their grades and access highly selective universities.

Working in partnership with schools in London since 2008, the Access Project has a proven track record of raising attainment and widening access. They offer students tutorials in the following subjects:

Maths, Economics, English, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geography, History, French, Spanish, Psychology and Sociology

As a tutor you would meet with your student for one hour a week at a coffee shop or other public location near your place of study. The AP train all their volunteers, give you a fantastic bank of resources and their Programme Coordinators are always on hand to provide support and guidance.

Interested in volunteering as a tutor? For more information or to register, visit the website www.theaccessproject.org.uk or emailinfo@theaccessproject.org.uk

King’s Widening Participation Department needs you!

Widening Participation are seeking current King’s PhD students who would be interested in supervising an academic piece of work, produced by A-level pupils. They will provide full support and a payment of £150 per student completing an assignment with your support. This is a great way to use your experience of university to help pupils in understanding and developing the skills necessary to be successful at a competitive university. In addition, this offers you an opportunity to work with young people and gain experience of supervising, marking and providing feedback on academic work close to undergraduate level.

Tutors will be paid a flat rate of £150 per student. This will be staggered in 2 payments one at mid-submission, one at completion. Tutors will be expected to mentor at least two students, however this will vary based on the subjects the students choose.

This role requires you to be available in London for around 10 hours between July and September 2015 to meet with and provide feedback to your tutees.

Please note: If you are a non EU resident you must have an in date Working Visa in your passport OR an in date Biometric Working Visa.

You must be available for the following dates:

  • Tutor Training: 10th June
  • Meet your mentor evening: 9th July

Please click here to access the job description and person specification and an application form can be found here.

  • Completed application forms must be returned Friday 8th May
  • Interviews will be held on Wednesday 20th of May

If you have any queries please contact Anne-Marie Henderson in the Widening Participation Department: anne-marie.henderson@kcl.ac.uk or 020 7848 3948

The Access Project

Winning a place to study at a top university is an incredible achievement and the start of a life-changing experience. However, for students from disadvantaged areas the step is not easy as they are half as likely as their more affluent peers to get the top grades needed to apply to the most selective universities.

The Access Project matches motivated school students with PhD candidates and Post Docs for weekly one-to-one tutorials, sessions which support their class work and help them boost their grades.

Working in partnership with schools since 2008, the Access Project has a proven track record of raising attainment and widening university access, and they are now working with 14 schools in London.

With the programme expanding, they are looking for more volunteers to tutor students in the following subjects at GCSE and A-level: English, Maths, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, History. They also offer tutorials in Geography, Spanish, French and German, although with less demand from students.

As a tutor, you would meet with your student for one hour a week, at King’s College London (in a suitable public, or freely bookable space). The Access Project trains all volunteers, gives them access to a bank of resources, and their Programme Coordinators are on hand to provide support and guidance. They are unable to pay volunteers, but offer a strong support system and an opportunity to develop teaching and facilitating skills.

For more information email info@theaccessproject.org.uk or visit our Teaching Opportunities page on the Graduate School’s Intranet pages.

Click here to access the flyer for the Access Project.

Advice for would-be private tutors

Private tuition in the UK is a booming industry. It’s well-paid, rewarding and extremely flexible. What’s not to like? Here are some key areas to consider before getting involved.

Specialist or generalist?

There are no specific qualifications for becoming a private tutor in the UK, which means that your academic background becomes your selling point. Can you pass on to others what you’ve been successful in? There’s demand for private tuition in a surprising range of subjects ranging from the specialized (e.g. accountancy exams or statistics for social sciences) to help in school subjects such as English, maths and grammar school entry exams. Recent graduates are often favoured by parents as tutors because they still remember the difficulties of school work, and because they can become inspiring role models.

Tuition agency or independent?

The vast majority of private tutors are self-employed. There are both rewards and challenges associated with this employment status, but statistics reveal that it is becoming an increasingly popular way of working.  Those who have never tutored before will often seek out tuition agencies not only to obtain work, but also to receive support or training on entering the industry for the first time. Every so often, the British press runs a story on a top end tuition agency providing so-called ‘super tutors’ to work for celebrity clients. On the other hand, with a flair for marketing and a willingness to research the market and relevant curricula, many tutors have carved out a career for themselves independently of tuition agencies.

A third option is to take on a tuition centre franchise. Tuition centres often take the form of an after-school club where children will have private tuition in small groups. Key industry names are Kumon , Kip McGrath or Magikats.

Part-time or full-time?

Private tuition has the advantages of being both well-paid (£30/hour+) and flexible. For graduates who are trying to break into (or are currently working in) the creative industries, private tutoring has become a valuable source of income. For others, it can become a rewarding full-time career option in itself. This has recently been recognized by The Tutors’ Association, a fledgling industry body for the UK private tuition industry, which offers membership to both tuition companies and individual ‘career tutors’.

One recent development which has helped tutors work full-time is the rise in online tuition because it means that tutors’ working hours are no longer restricted to after school or holidays. Instead, graduates can take advantage of the cachet of their UK degree, and use conferencing and whiteboard technologies to deliver lessons to students worldwide at any time of day or night.

Further information

Before deciding to tutor, it is worth spending some time to research the industry, for example on relevant Linkedin forums. Understanding the issues surrounding child protection – including what the government’s Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) means for tutors – is also important. Two further sources of information are listed below:

The Tutors’ Association – thetutorsassociation.org.uk

Tutoring: The Complete Guide – www.thetutorpages.com/free-tutoring-ebook

With thanks to guest blogger, Henry Fagg, Director of thetutorpages.com, an award-winning resource and listings site for the UK private tuition industry.