Case Studies: Data Science careers

Dr Kim Nilsson, Pivigo:

Kim is an Astrophysics PhD turned Entrepreneur. She is the CEO of Pivigo, an organisation focused on supporting analytical MScs and PhDs in their career transitions into data science roles. She is passionate about people, data and connecting the two.

Kim realised that, despite being a Hubble astronomer, academia was not for her.  She undertook an MBA and worked briefly in financial services before setting up her own company.  Pivigo helps researchers gain commercial experience that will help them into a data science career.

On the day she spoke, there were 4003 jobs on LinkedIn with the title ‘data scientist’.  A starting salary will be £35-£50k.  The different sectors include commerce, operations, consumer marketing, local government and charities.

Key skills include Python, R and Java.  You need to have curiosity and scepticism, and ability to communicate and some business awareness.  Your CV needs to show HOW you apply your data skills to problems.

Check out MOOCs on Coursera, competitions on Kaggle or create your own data challenge!

Dr Ana Costa e Silva, TIBCO:

Ana has 15 years experience with data, undergraduate studies in Business and a PhD in computer science (AI) from the Edinburgh University. She has previously been a manager economic statistician for the Statistics department of the Portuguese Central Bank and a researcher of the inner workings of the global stock market for Edinburgh Partners.

Ana’s company helps businesses understand their data and start to respect their customers.  Her data analysis helps to optimise pricing, check for fraud, re-route transport (eg container ships avoiding storms and finding available docking).  She helps the engineers in the company make their products look better (eg in oil and gas, optimising engineering tools, and in healthcare, getting sensors to call nurses when there are changes in patient data).  One client was a casino company, MGM Resorts, and they looked at historic data to see which punters had not yet lost too much money: these people were texted with offers at other entertainment places and then encouraged back, as data demonstrated that people who had not lost too much were more likely to come back and spend more money.

Dr Zach Izham, Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Zach has a PhD in Mechanical Engineering and after several roles in aero-engineering, is now responsible for designing, implementing and testing solutions for data analytics and machine learning for clients in insurance/ banking/automotive industries and also governmental agencies from a ‘data science’ perspective.

He talked about why he left academia, citing the main reason as being that it would not be possible to earn enough money.  He works for HPE where he helps businesses leverage their data to run a more efficient business.  Issues he encounters are where servers don’t talk to each other and he has to find solutions to problems.  He encourage attendees to be picky about the business they choose to work in and consider starting their own business.

He says that AI becomes Machine Learning when it is mainstream, such as the self-driving car.

Interesting courses include Andrew Lung’s Coursera course and you should check out SiliconMilkRoundabout (jobs fair for tech people).

Case Studies: Consulting Careers

Three King’s alumni tell their stories about their different experiences in consulting.

Dr Fahd Choudhury, Deloitte

Fahd defines management consultants as ‘people who help a business implement a change’.  He moved from a PhD studying Alzheimer’s disease as he found that it wasn’t really bringing enough meaning: there wasn’t really a point where there was a yes/no answer.  After spending some time at Merck & Co, he moved to Deloitte where he spent six months in the life science consulting division before moving into banking.  Here he was worked in some of the most profile banking mergers of recent years and is able to say ‘I helped build TSB’!  He built the credit risk function, which took 2.5 years to do and cost over £1bn.  He also gets involved in look at the conduct of sales staff and how TSB brings on new customers.  He advises the company on how to defend itself or collaborate with technology affecting credit card providers.

Through the opportunities Deloitte gives to employees to do some pro-bono work, he has been able to get to know the CEO and Head of Research at the Alzheimer’s Society, thus giving and outlet to his science interest.

Dr Shirley Wong, Sociable Pharma

Shirley’s PhD is from the Dental Institute.  She took 18 months to move into the role that she wanted and she did some work for the Oxbridge Round Table to help her get some relevant experience.  She started off working for a small competitive intelligence company and then moved to be an analyst working for Sociable Pharma.  Here her work is not to change business structure, but to help them to be more competitive.

Work might include looking at the ‘landscape’ of particular therapy areas: what drugs are there, what are the regulatory checkpoints that competitors have reached, comparing the situation in the UK, EU and US.  She has been to two conferences since starting in June where she gets to talk to clients and key opinion formers.

She feels she’s learning all the time, particularly the jargon of the business and how better to do stakeholder engagement.

Dr Catie Rousset, Prescient Healthcare

Catie’s post-doc was in the medical imaging department at St Thomas’s.  She moved into Prescient about 18 months ago (you can read more about Catie’s journey here).  Prescient works in partnership with 16 of the world’s top 20 pharmaceutical firms in three areas: new product planning, brand planning and mature brand planning.  They do this through stake holder research, workshop moderation and arranging conferences.

She feels it took about six months to understand what the job is and how to get the right information from people.  It’s different from academia in that there is a different kind of pressure: each client brings its own pressure.  You develop a broader knowledge rather than having a deep expertise.  You HAVE to work with people, rather than on your own!  You learn new skills, particularly in presentation and learning about new areas.  So far, it has not got boring, there are no labs to work in, and there is some travel!

Smaller companies may appreciate a speculative approach to them.  Language skills help (her company works 24/7 across Asia, Europe and the US), and there are roughtly 50/50 women/men.  She works more or fewer hours depending on the time of year.  Ad-hoc projects from clients increase as the financial year proceeds and at conference season days can be very long.  Otherwise, you can decide how much of yourself you want to invest in the role.

 

 

 

 

Career Spotlight: Data Science

It was great to see so many of you at the Consultancy event last week.  A write up will follow soon on this blog.

Next week, we will be hearing from three people who work in data science.  Find out more about how your analytic, programming and data skills can work in industry.

Dr Kim Nilsson, Pivigo:

Kim is an Astrophysics PhD turned Entrepreneur. She is the CEO of Pivigo, an organisation focused on supporting analytical MScs and PhDs in their career transitions into data science roles. She is passionate about people, data and connecting the two.

Dr Ana Costa e Silva, TIBCO:

Ana has 15 years experience with data, undergraduate studies in Business and a PhD in computer science (AI) from the Edinburgh University. She has previously been a manager economic statistician for the Statistics department of the Portuguese Central Bank and a researcher of the inner workings of the global stock market for Edinburgh Partners.

Dr Zach Izham, Hewlett Packard

Zach has a PhD in Mechanical Engineering and after several roles in aero-engineering, is now responsible for designing, implementing and testing solutions for data analytics and machine learning for clients in insurance/ banking/automotive industries and also governmental agencies from a ‘data science’ perspective.

  • Time: Weds 10th Feb, 5.30-6.30pm
  • Place: Franklin Wilkins Building, Waterloo campus, room 1.70
  • No need to book