New book out: From Bench to Bedside, to Track & Field: The Context of Enhancement and its Ethical Relevance

Paperback | 978-0-9889865-4-1 | October 2014 | pp 185 | $24.95

From the back cover:

What is it to talk about gene transfer, gene therapy, and gene doping? Is choosing deafness with preimplantation genetic diagnosis an ethical way to carry on a cultural bloodline? What are the ethical and social implications of genetic testing to identify precocious talents? Should sponsors be held responsible for the doping behaviours of their athletes?camporesi_cover_6x9-202x300 These are only some of the questions that Dr. Silvia Camporesi addresses in this book, through a contextual, bottom up approach based on real-world ethical dilemmas. This book represents a unique contribution to the debate on enhancement technologies as it spans from the bench of molecular biology where the technologies are being developed, to the bedside of a clinical trial where they are used for selective reproduction or for first-in-human gene therapy studies, to the track & field where they are being applied to enhance human athletic performance. These investigations address current debates regarding the resurgence of eugenics in relation to genetic technologies, and provide a clear and much needed ethical autopsy of contemporary genetic practices.

The book is forthcoming for the ‘UC Perspectives in Medical Humanities Book Series‘, with a foreword by Professor Søren Holm. The series publishes scholarship produced or reviewed under the auspices of the University of California Medical Humanities Consortium, a multi-campus collaborative of faculty, students and trainees in the humanities, medicine, and health sciences.The editor of the series is Professor Brian Dolan.

From the acknowledgments:

This book builds to a large extent on my PhD dissertation in Philosophy of Medicine for King’s College London. […] From 2010 to 2013 I had the privilege of working in the intellectually stimulating atmosphere of the Wellcome Trust-funded Centre for the Humanities & Health at King’s College London. I am very grateful to my supervisor, Dr Matteo Mameli, Reader in Philosophy at King’s College London, for supporting and mentoring me, and allowing me a wide degree of freedom in pursuing my research interests during my PhD. I have very fond memories of engaging discussions on medical humanities and philosophy of medicine (among other topics!) with my colleagues at the Centre for the Humanities & Health over the past three years. In particular, thanks to Elisabetta Babini, Natalie Banner, Monika Class, Bonnie Evans, Keren Hammerschlag, Elselijn Kingma, MM McCabe, David Papineau, Anne Marie Rafferty, Maria Vaccarella, and Stefan Wagner. A big thanks goes to Professor Brian Hurwitz, Director of the Centre, for his great support in helping me launch my career.
I now have the pleasure of working as a Lecturer in Bioethics & Society the Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine at King’s College London, and I thank Professor Nikolas Rose, Head of Department, and all my new colleagues at SSHM for welcoming me and fostering such a vibrant work environment.

Today: 1st JOINT MEETING Centre for the Humanities and Health and Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine

The Centre for the Humanities & Health is glad to announce the 1st joint meeting with the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, to take place today, October 24th, from 130 to 530 om in K0.18, Strand Campus.

Programme as follows:

1.30 – 1.45 Welcome and Introduction (Professor Brian Hurwitz and Professor Nikolas Rose)

Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine
Chair Professor Nikolas Rose 1.45 – 3.15
· Individual introductions
· Narratives of Depreshen: reflections on [Iranian] psychiatric subjectivities
Dr Orkideh Behrouzan
· Risk-benefit evaluations in biomedical research
Dr Annette Rid
· Making medicine molecular – the emergence of a socio-technical regime for personalised medicine
Dr Stuart Hogarth

Discussion (15 minutes)
3.15-3.45 – tea

Centre for Humanities and Health
Chair Professor Brian Hurwitz 3.45-5.15
· Introductions and Presentations
· Conceptualising the medical gaze: the contested role of “distress” in the definitions of mental disorder in the ICD, DSM and draft DSM-5
Prof Derek Bolton
· The impact of culture and war on the presentation and interpretation of psychiatric disorder in the UK, 1914-1960
Prof Edgar Jones
· What you can do with portraits
Prof Ludmilla Jordanova

Discussion (15 minutes)
5.15 Drinks

24th October 2012 1.30-5.30
LOCATION: K0.18