Water Connections Workshop KCL and UNESCO-IHE partnership launch

CANCELLED Water Connections Workshop

Due to the London tube strike and the King’s College Union strike action this workshop has been cancelled. Please note that WaterWorld Policy Support Session on 7 February from 11-12.30 will go ahead as scheduled as will the Annual EED Seminar.

KCL and UNESCO-IHE partnership launch

Thursday and Friday – 6th & 7th of February 2014

River Room: The Strand

Water Connections is a two day workshop to launch the KCL/UNESCO-IHE partnership, with an emphasis on identifying synergies in research interests and avenues for collaboration. The workshop is open to staff, and PhD and masters students with an interest in water.

Registration is required via the link below. Attendees are encouraged to participate in all of the sessions even if they may not directly relate to their research interest in order to identify broader areas of collaboration.  All events will be held in the River Room, 2nd Floor, King’s Building, Strand Campus. Refreshments and lunch provided. A provisional agenda is provided below.

To register for the Workshop please follow this link:

http://doodle.com/na63z2gs5fk5y4au

 

Optional – EED Annual Seminar

Professor Alan Hildrew: ‘Titrating the landscape: the ecology of freshwater acidification’

Friday 7th Feb, 17:15, S-1.06

Alan Hildrew is an ecologist with particular interests in freshwater communities and ecosystems, having researched actively on many aspects of ecology including food webs, species interactions, disturbance, species traits and ecosystem processes including decomposition and nutrient cycling. He has published on the science of freshwater acidification and its recovery, and on river regulation and restoration. He is Emeritus Professor of Ecology at Queen Mary, University of London, and previously worked at Kenyatta University (Nairobi) and the Universities of Sussex and Cardiff. He is Chief Editor ofFreshwater Biology and was awarded the Ecology Prize of the International Ecology Institute in 2012.

Please register at: http://tinyurl.com/EED-Lecture

Seats still available: Annual lecture on ecology and freshwater systems

The staff involved in the activities of the Earth and Environmental Dynamics Research Group are hosting their annual guest lecture by Professor Alan Hildrew on ‘Titrating the landscape: the ecology of freshwater acidification’ at 17:15 on 7 Feb.

Sign up and save your seat for this major event at:

http://tinyurl.com/EED-Lecture

EED Annual Lecture_Portrait

Titrating the landscape: the ecology of freshwater acidification

Speaker: Professor Alan Hildrew, Emeritus Professor of Ecology at Queen Mary, University of London

Friday 7th Feb, 17:15, S-1.06

[Bio]   Alan Hildrew is an ecologist with particular interests in freshwater communities and ecosystems, having researched actively on many aspects of ecology including food webs, species interactions, disturbance, species traits and ecosystem processes including decomposition and nutrient cycling. He has published on the science of freshwater acidification and its recovery, and on river regulation and restoration. He is Emeritus Professor of Ecology at Queen Mary, University of London, and previously worked at Kenyatta University (Nairobi) and the Universities of Sussex and Cardiff. He is Chief Editor of Freshwater Biology and was awarded the Ecology Prize of the International Ecology Institute in 2012.

 

Water & Economics: Seminar talk

Don’t miss the upcoming London Water Research Group seminar on  3 February on the Economic perspectives on the political economy of water by Matthew Aggrawala.

Matthew is from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change & the Environment, London School of Economics and we’ll start at 5:30 pm in K4U.04 (Pyramid Room), Strand Campus.

There will be more events announced on this blog, so keep a bookmark!

[Details]

 5:30-7:00 pm, Monday at King’s College London – Strand Campus, 

4th floor K4U.04 (Pyramid Room)

See map at http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/strand/Strand.aspx

There is no cost to participate in these events.

If you are from outside KCL, please confirm your intention to attend to Dr. Naho Mirumachi, Department of Geography KCL

London Water Research Group seminar series is hosted by the Environment, Politics and Development Group, Department of Geography, King’s College London. The LWRG is devoted to the promotion of critical water research primarily in transboundary and developing contexts, and welcomes contributions from all. Not all views expressed in the seminar series are shared by the LWRG or EPD Group.

Scholarships available for Masters study!

Staff of King’s Water is involved in three Masters programmes that touch upon issues of water:

These distinct but complementary programmes build upon a long history of the Geography department’s expertise in water issue, and provide teaching informed by cutting-edge research.

We’re very pleased to announce scholarship opportunities offered by both the Geography Department and the College to undertake these Masters programmes.

The department specific funding details are here:

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/geography/study/masters/funding.aspx

Scholarships offered by the College can be accessed in the link below.

Early applications encouraged!

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources/pgt.aspx

The Basin Challenge: How Would You Develop a River Basin?

The Basin Challenge is tool designed by CPWF-Mekong with support from Australian AID and ABC Science. The purpose of the game is to allow participants the opportunity to experience the challenges associated with developing a river basin. The game is played over 50 turns with each turn representing a year. In this way, participants can experience both the potential short and long-term benefits, costs and challenges associated with development.

Basin challenge

The game can be played with two players developing half the basin each or in one player mode, where one player develops the entire basin themselves. Each player begins with $2 Billion dollars budget. Each player must use the “Catchment Manager ”, “Water Statistics” and “Game Statistics” Tabs at the bottom of the screen to manage the Basin. The Basin is a hypothetical basin, but the choices available to players represent many of the real choices available to decision makers in river basins around the world. The benefits and costs of these choices have also been modelled from real environmental and social data.

Players make decisions on how to develop the basin by moving the cursor over a grid square on their half of the basin. By clicking the mouse on the grid square they are able to select from a number of options including agricultural development and hydropower. Hydropower development is only available on rivers. Other decisions can be made including cutting down forests or developing tourism sites. Each choice will have economic, social and environmental impacts. Developments also take time. For example, a large hydropower dam could take four or five years to develop, with each year representing a turn for that player. Once a player is done with their turn and would like to proceed they should push the orange “Next Turn button”. Players can move up and down the basin using the arrows at the top and bottom of the screen.

As the player develops their side of the basin, their cities will grow. By clicking on cities the player can see the population of the city and other important factors such as city happiness and ecosystem health. When a city glows red it means that there is an opportunity for the player. This opportunity can be viewed by clicking on the city. If the player does not choose to view an opportunity then it will disappear after a few turns. It is the player’s responsibility to balance the need to develop the basin alongside social and environmental sustainability.

The Basin, as in other river basins around the world, also experiences random climatic events these events can be significant or minor. It is the player’s responsibility to balance the impact of these events along with the development of the basin.

The best way to learn how to play is to try – so please go ahead and see how you manage to develop the basin. The player with the highest score wins! Click to play:

thebasinchallenge.com