Open Access Journal articles from our project findings

 Three journal articles are now available to download from the links below

Polly Radcliffe, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas d’Oliveira, Susan Lea, Wagner dos Santos Figueiredo and Gail Gilchrist (2016), Accounting for intimate partner violence perpetration. A cross-cultural comparison of English and Brazilian male substance users’ explanations. Drug and Alcohol Review. DOI: 10.1111/dar.12450 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dar.12450/full

Polly Radcliffe and Gail Gilchrist, (2016), ‘‘You can never work with addictions in isolation’’: Addressing intimate partner violence perpetration by men in substance misuse treatment. International Journal of Drug Policy, 36, 130-140. http://www.ijdp.org/article/S0955-3959(16)30088-3/pdf

Gail Gilchrist, Polly Radcliffe, Ana Regina Noto, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas d’Oliveira (2016), The prevalence and factors associated with ever perpetrating intimate partner violence by men receiving substance-use treatment in Brazil and England: A cross-cultural comparison. Drug and Alcohol Review, DOI: 10.1111/dar.12436. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dar.12436/epdf

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ADVANCE GRANT

ADVANCE research programme – Could group therapy reduce domestic violence among men in substance use treatment?

 A new King’s College London research programme will examine whether group therapy leads to a reduction in domestic violence among men receiving treatment for substance use.

 The ADVANCE research programme, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), starts next month and will bring together researchers, patients and policymakers from across King’s, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, University of Worcester, University of Bristol, University of Manchester, University of York, Rochester Institute of Technology (USA) and RESPECT, the UK membership organisation for work with domestic violence perpetrators, male victims and young people.

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) refers to any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse. Previous research has found that 40 per cent of men receiving treatment for substance use had been physically or sexually violent towards their partner in the previous year, rising to 70 per cent for psychological abuse – rates far higher than among the general population.

Despite this, few studies have been conducted to examine the effectiveness of interventions for male substance users who perpetrate IPV. The new five-year research programme will test whether a group therapy that addresses IPV and substance use concurrently reduces IPV carried out by men attending substance use treatment sessions, and whether this leads to a resulting improvement in depressive symptoms among their current and ex-partners.  Continue reading