Challenging the traditional tools for economic analysis in competition cases – 10th Annual IGLR Conference, King’s College London

The following is a report from a presentation by Magali Eben at the International Graduate Legal Research (ILGR) Conference on 4 April 2016.

Presenting her idea, Megali Eben suggests that the traditional tools used for defining the relevant market in competition cases can be updated by including personal data among the relevant elements that are considered in this context. Continue reading

SYSTEMIC CRISES AND THE COST OF REGULATION: THE DODD-FRANK ACT, THE EU SINGLE RESOLUTION MECHANISM AND UNEXPECTED LESSONS FROM FREE BANKING

Teemu Alexander Puutio[1]

A.  Systemic crises and political capturing

The global meltdown sparked by the 2007–2008 subprime mortgage failures gave momentum to a tidal wave of regulatory reactions. In the United States, Congress’ attempt at reigning in the mavericks of Wall Street came in the form of the ambitious Dodd-Frank Act[i], which aims to promote financial stability by improving accountability and transparency, ending bailouts, and protecting consumers from abusive financial services’ practices. To match its broad objectives, the act spans 848 pages where it creates new entities such as the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection and addresses a multitude of complex issues, such as predispute arbitration, investor contracts, and beyond.[ii] Whereas the true litmus test of the act is in the lack or severity of future crises, several vocal groups have continued lambasting the act as either too stringent or diluted, largely correlating with their affiliation and levels of affection with Wall Street.[iii] Continue reading

Human Rights Reporting and the Non-financial Disclosure Regime in Europe

Koen de Roo[1]

Business involvement in human rights violations as laid bare by cases such as the 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza – a building housing clothing factories situated in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka – has led to the introduction of several legal and non-legal mechanisms which aim to enforce corporate responsibility to respect human rights. The most recent step in integrating this responsibility in corporate governance regulation is included in the European Union Directive on non-financial disclosure (the ‘Directive’). The Directive contains the obligation for large companies (>500 employees) to describe policies, outcomes and principal risks related to human rights matters in their management reports. Continue reading