Research, Impact and the UK Parliament

Research, Impact and the UK Parliament is a training conference taking place in UCL on Wednesday 7th June 2017.

This is an opportunity for Kings College London academics to learn how their research can influence and impact proceedings at the UK Parliament.

The event will be at 1.30 – 5.00pm on 7th June 2017 at University College London.  It is open to all academic researchers, from PhD students to senior researchers, and university impact support staff.

Tickets can be booked through Eventbrite.

At this 3 hour training event, you will learn:

  • How to contact MPs and Members of the House of Lords from Parliament’s Outreach & Engagement Service
  • How to work with Select Committees from a clerk of a House of Commons Select Committee
  • How Parliament has been cited in REF 2014 impact case studies from the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology

“This was one of the most useful events I’ve ever attended.” – RIUKP Attendee, January 2017

“This was a very informative event. I enjoyed learning about how to engage with Parliament and consider the impact of my research on parliamentary activities” – RIUKP Attendee, November 2016

Tickets cost £40 and include lunch. If this fee is a barrier to attendance, please contact us; we may make exceptions in some circumstances.  We are also able to discuss group bookings if you would like to book a block of tickets for your institution.

Book your place at Research, Impact and the UK Parliament now.

We hold RIUKP events around the UK throughout the year: check www.parliament.uk/academic-training for more details.

 

Policy Idol – Could you change the world in three minutes?

Do you want to change the world? Do you have an idea for policymakers? Do you
think you can convince a group of policy experts in just three minutes?

Prizes

£250 Audience prize
£500 Best delivery
£500 Best analysis
£1,000 Overall winner

Policy Idol 2017Policy Idol is an annual competition open to all current students and staff at King’s, in which participants pitch their policy ideas to an elite panel of leading figures from the worlds of politics, academia and industry.

You can enter by yourself or as part of a team, and on the day you will have just three minutes to present your idea to the judges, who will assess your pitch on the quality of delivery and the evidence and analysis underpinning it.

Organised by the Policy Institute at King’s, the competition sees the best ideas selected in a series of heats, with standout pitches from each heat put through to the final. All finalists receive bespoke training in policy analysis and communications, as well as an opportunity to improve their pitch.

The final takes place in front of a live audience, with both the judges and the audience voting for their favourite idea at the end of the evening.

Applications accepted until Friday, 2 December 2016 at 17.00.

Find out more and sign up at www.kcl.ac.uk/policyidol

Spotlight Series: Careers in Policy – notes from the discussion on 26th October 2016

city-hall-719963_640Our speakers were:

Lila Caballero-Sosa

Title:      Policy Adviser at ActionAid

PhD:      Government; focusing on the Mexican Chamber of Deputies, at LSE

Lila has extensive experience in policy research, advice and management. As part of the policy team at ActionAid UK, she carries out research and develop policy analysis and strategies on aid and development finance. Although she has never formally studied at King’s, Lila has strong affiliations with the college and is currently carrying out a collaborative research project with the King’s International Development Institute.

George Windsor

Title:      Senior Policy Researcher at Nesta

PhD:      Political Science and Government; Highly skilled migration and the promotion of entrepreneurship in the UK at Loughborough University

At Nesta, George focuses upon carrying out research relating to the creative and digital economies here in the UK. This includes analysis of policy documentation such as the revised ‘Creative Industries Council’ strategy, as well as exploring concepts such as ‘The Fusion Effect’ which explores the utility of businesses combining knowledge from both the arts and sciences.

Ben Whitham

 Title:      Policy Research at Citizens Advice

PhD:      International Politics – University of Reading

Recently a Policy Researcher at Citizens Advice, a part-time Lecturer in International Politics at the University of East London, and a (voluntary) member of the Board of Directors at the Nuclear Information Service, Ben has many years’ experience of professional research and teaching in both Higher Education and policy roles. Ben is now a lecturer at Loughborough University. At present his work focuses upon the public services complaint landscape and he is utilising innovative social media research and big data analysis.

 Here are some of the questions and tips provided by our speakers:

Some common features of policy work:

  • Organisations are often small and run on tight budgets – multitasking and flexibility is needed
  • Work is often politically sensitive and discretion is frequently needed
  • Small organisations often mean opportunities to try new areas of work and take responsibility quickly
  • There are often benefits such as international travel or the chance to work with government departments and ministers and have impact nationally

Does your PhD have to be relevant to policy work?

All three panellists agreed that this was not necessary and that transferable skills from your PHD were more important.

How can you become more employable in policy?

Take internships if you can but also take less formal approaches, be willing to collaborate on writing blogs, approach someone who is already working in the field and suggest working together. Be imaginative it’s often easier than you think to approach and work with someone.

You can try getting an administrative role in an organisation you want to work for and wait for a good opportunity to come up. It’s usually easier to move within and organisation than it is to enter from the outside.

How can you prepare for this type of work?

Learn (or re-learn) to write specifically for a non-academic audience. This may be harder than you realised. Your new employers, however, will probably appreciate your academic skills and draw on them for example in gathering and analysing data.

Policy work is often quite different to academia – results are required more quickly and the methods used to research are often different to the ones you’ve used up to now. It’s a good idea to get familiar with quantative methods and software like SPSS, if you aren’t already.

Can you re-enter academia after a period working in a non-academic role?

Yes, and this can be a strength, bringing skills and experience that you might not have otherwise. You can also mix further study or academic work with a policy role. Two of our speakers had direct experience of this. Your connection with and understanding of academia can also be very useful.

Top tip for policy job application:

Read job description carefully, show you have the essentials, trust yourself – have confidence in yourself! You’ve done and achieved a lot. Be succinct and plain in your answers to questions. Use evidence and tangible examples.

Many thanks to our speakers who gave up their time so generously and our audience for their excellent questions.

King’s Think Tank Recruits for 2016-17!

If you are looking for career development opportunity or aspiring for a career in policy, diplomacy, marketing or journalism within a health sciences framework, please read on.

The Global Health Policy Centre at King’s Think Tank is looking for students to help reshape the global healthcare policy and promote health equity. They have the following voluntary positions to offer:

  • Policy Centre Editor : If you are good at writing and brainstorming, and have great ideas to bring onboard, you should consider applying for this post.
  • Policy Centre Researcher : If you are a stickler for details, a hardcore evidence-based researcher with exceptional writing skills and exciting ideas, you’d make a great researcher.
  • Policy Centre Liaison : If you enjoy talking to people, are well-organised and a fantastic event manager, this is just the role for you.

For a full job description and to apply please visit: www.kingsthinktank.com/#!recruitment-2016-17/umls4

Deadline for applications are Monday 5th September, 2016. Should you have any questions, please email president@kingsthinktank.org

King’s Cultural Institute: Collaborative Innovation Scheme for Early Career Researchers

 Collaborative Innovation Scheme for Early Career Researchers

Making an impact beyond academia

The Cultural Institute at King’s is delighted to announce a scheme for Early Career Researchers to develop collaborative projects with a cultural or creative industry partner in their area of research. Up to 9 projects will receive funding of £1500 (plus a £500 prize for the best completed project) as well as the opportunity to:

  • shape their project idea with input and expertise from cultural partners;
  • receive support from Institute Associates in developing the joint application with the cultural partner; and
  • disseminate research findings through a novel medium and generate impact beyond academia. We would like to invite PhD students and academic staff within five years of PhD award to submit a 300-word summary of their project idea by Friday 1 April 2016. The Institute will suggest suitable partners to successful applicants who do not have an established contact with the cultural sector but we also encourage proposals by applicants who have already secured a cultural collaboration.

To be successful, proposals must:

  •   be innovative, test new approaches and provoke further debate;
  •   have potential for collaboration between art/culture and academia;
  •   produce high quality and original outputs; and
  •   have a clear vision for influencing wider policy, practice or production and informing research and learning at King’s

For more information and application forms, please click here or contact Richard Mason (richard.mason@kcl.ac.uk)