Advancing Innovation in Health, Idea Workshop

King’s College London Innovation Forum, King’s College London Health and Life Science Enterprise Committee and Entrepreneurship have put together a unique opportunity for you to use your problem-solving skills to come up with solutions to tackle global health challenges we face today. The event is free and open to all at KCL. This special event offers you the opportunity to:

  • Develop ideas in teams to tackle health challenges including (but not limited to) obesity, antimicrobial drug resistance, diabetes and cancer.
  • Receive feedback on the idea from a panel of experts from PwC, QuintilesIMS etc.
  • Present your idea to a panel of judges with expertise in global health from leading organisations including GSK.
  • Each participant will receive a certificate and have chance to win a prize!

If you don’t have an idea or a team, don’t worry just come along and the organisers will assist you in finding a team. If you cannot participate in the workshop, you can still attend the final team presentation. There will be a reception with free food and drinks, plus the opportunity to build your professional networks and develop contacts that may be beneficial for the next step in your career.

Click here to register for this event.

Kings Engaged Researcher Network (KERN)

What is KERN?

KERN is an exciting new collaboration which launched in October 2016.  KERN aims to foster a growing community of researchers interested in developing, sharing and celebrating their public engagement practice at King’s. The Engaged Researcher meetings and events are aimed at students, researchers and clinical staff at King’s College London. The idea behind KERN is to create a social network for researchers interested in engaging different audiences with their research. They also share monthly newsletters with opportunities to get involved, information on funding, resources and sharing examples of good practice.

Upcoming Events:

RUNNING THE KERN – WORKSHOP

Interested in running the KERN? The why not go along to their brainstorm workshop & decide how the KERN should run in 2017/18 (there will be cake!). Sign up here. (places limited)

If you are interested in enhancing your CV and developing your engagement experience, make sure you don’t miss out on this opportunity.

21 March 2017 | 2-4pm | Council Room | Free

CALLING ALL SCIENCE BUSKERS!

Did you attend KERN’s ‘How to make a busk’ workshop in Feb? The Crick has an exciting call out for science buskers!

Interested? Email KERN at KERN@kcl.ac.uk by 22 March 2017

The Postgraduate Spring Ball 2017

A Postgraduate Spring Ball has been organised by students* for students within the heart of London!

Spring Ball 2017

For full details, visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/257082428060561/

As with previous events, a super quick sell out is anticipated! 

*Organised by students from the following Universities:

UCL || LSE || UAL || KCL || CASS || CITY || LBS || QMUL || HULT || SOAS || RHUL || IMPERIAL || WESTMINSTER || UEL || REGENTS || GSU || BIRKBEC

Advancing Innovation in Health

Tuesday, 28th February, 5.30 – 8.30pm
Lecture Theatre 1, New Hunt’s House, Guy’s campus

Keynote speaker: Sir Bruce Keogh KBE, Medical Director, NHS England
Hosted by Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice Principal (Health), King’s

King’s College Entrepreneurship Institute and King’s health societies have put together a unique opportunity for you to hear from key opinion leaders in the entrepreneurial world. The event is free and open to all at KCL.

This special event offers you the opportunity to:

  • Vote on the challenges faced by the health industry you feel most passionately about, and learn about the important role innovation and entrepreneurship play in tackling them.
  • Meet our 4 x 4 showcase – Four King’s health innovators, Pankaj Chandak, Project Medicine, Cydar Ltd and QUiPP app who have just four minutes to share their amazing experiences with you – and get you hooked!
  • Speak to leading exhibitors including DigitalHealth.London, King’s Commercialisation Institute and the King’s20 accelerator, followed by a drinks and canapés networking reception.
  • Contribute to your personal learning. You will be emailed a Certificate of Engagement after the event signed by Professor Lechler and Julie Devonshire OBE, Director of the Entrepreneurship Institute.

There will be a reception with free food and drinks, plus the opportunity to build your professional networks and develop contacts that may be beneficial for the next step in your career.

For full details and to register for your place, click here.

KDSA X’mas Party – for all King’s PGR students

FAO King’s PGR students

Due to the rip-roaring success of the PGR Social Mixer that was held in September this year, the King’s Doctoral Students Association (KDSA) have organised a free Christmas party for all PGR students across King’s College London.

Please come along to Guy’s Bar & Café on Friday, 16th December from 7:30pm to finish the autumn semester in style!

To can get an idea of numbers, please sign up to this free event via Eventbrite – Click here

It just so happens that the 16th is also Christmas Jumper Day! Garish woollen attire is therefore encouraged for the party!

Click here for the event’s Facebook page

We look forward to seeing you there!

For more info, contact: Jake Crawshaw, KDSA Events Coordinator, kdsa@kclsu.org

KDSA Xmas Party

British Library PGR Open Days

The British Library is running a series of Open Days for Doctoral Students, taking place in January, February and March 2017.

The Doctoral Open Days are a chance for PhD students who are new to the Library to discover the British Library’s unique research materials. From newspapers to maps, datasets to manuscripts, ships’ logs to websites, the British Library’s collections cover a wide range of formats and languages spanning the last 3,000 years. Doctoral Open Days are designed to explain the practicalities of using the Library and its services, plus help students navigate the physical and online collections.

As well as hearing from the library’s expert and friendly staff, students will have the opportunity to meet researchers in all disciplines. Each day concentrates on a different aspect of the library’s collections and most take an inter-disciplinary approach.

Interested in attending? Then pick the day you think will be most helpful with your studies!

The Open Days are as follows:

Asian &African Collections 16 January
News & Media 13-Jan
Social Sciences 30-Jan
Boston Spa 01-Feb
 Music Collections 13-Feb
Pre 1600 Collections 20-Feb
17 & 18th Century Collections 27 February
19th Century Collections 6 March
20th & 21st Century Collections 13 March

All events take place in the British Library Conference Centre at St Pancras, London, except for the event on 1 February 2017, which takes place at the Library’s site in Boston Spa, Yorkshire.

For further details of the all Open Days and how to book please go to the British Library’s website.

Places cost £10.00 including lunch and other refreshments.

Spotlight on Management Consultancy Careers – 19 Oct, 5.30pm – FWB 1.10

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The Spotlight Series is a set of panel events for King’s PhDs and research staff. Featuring employers, often alumni, who have PhDs, the panel seeks to give an insight into different sectors that are often attractive to people looking to move beyond academia. This event focuses on management consulting with PhD staff from KPMG, Oliver Wyman, and Capco.

Hosted by Kate Murray and Donald Lush. Speakers include Grant Repshire, Capco, Philip Livingstone from KPMG and Nick Faull from Oliver Wyman.

Grant Repshire, Consultant at Capco: With a PhD in English Language & Literature/Letters Grant is now a management consultant for Capco, with a focus on process improvement, technology, and IT and digital transformation.

Philip Livingstone – “My PhD focused on the interactions between reward pathways and attention pathways in the brain and how they are affected by nicotine in order to find new therapeutic targets for disorders such as schizophrenia. I took a particular interest in how dopamine levels in the brain would change in this pathways as a result of increasing the effects of nicotinic signalling. I am now a Manager in the KPMG Management Consulting Healthcare Team. I specialise in redesigning healthcare services across whole care systems, involving the NHS, local government and not-for-profit sectors.”

Nick Faull – Nick Faull is a Principal in Oliver Wyman’s London Office within the Financial Services practice. He has nine years of experience in consulting to Financial Services institutions across Europe with a focus on strategic IT and operations topics. He joined the firm after completing an atmospheric physics DPhil and a 2-year postdoc at the University of Oxford, working on the largest climate modelling experiment in the world. When you take up this opportunity, use #kcldo1thing to let us know how you got on!

 

Wednesday 19 October 2016 – 5.30pm

Waterloo: FWB 1.10

Hyperlink: https://kcl.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=2775&service=Careers+Service

Career Skills: Networking

Guest post from Aimee Wilde, Employer Engagement Officer, King’s Careers & Employability

At some point we’ve probably all been told to ‘network’ and nodded our heads along like we know what this means. But do we actually? Is it really that simple as walking into a room and collecting a load of emails? Not quite – but it is achievable and can be very valuable.

If you’re considering a move from academia to industry, then networking is your No.1 tool. It’s a great way to start researching about non-academic professions, and speaking with people who have already transitioned into commercial roles can be a lot more useful than reading a company website. On top of this, it gives you the opportunity to learn the jargon associated with your chosen industry. Employers want to hire ‘work-ready’ people wherever possible, and knowing the lingo can make it seem like you’re halfway there.

So how do you network well? Take a look at the tips below and see what results come from putting them into action.

1) Start early

You will not find your dream job overnight. Okay, a few people might, but this is unlikely and it’s better to start planning early. If you know you’re going to be finishing your PhD in a year’s time, start making friends in the right places now. And once you start, don’t stop! Maintaining a strong professional network is something that will help develop your career throughout your working life.

2) Be direct

If you don’t ask, you don’t get. One of the most effective networking techniques is to make contact with senior management at places you’re interested in working at. Of course, spamming emails to hundreds of CEOs is not productive – but a carefully crafted email to the right manager can get you noticed.

NOTE: If you’re thinking, ‘but managers never have their emails on company websites’ – you’re right, they often don’t. But they aren’t gold-dust either! It’s pretty straightforward to ‘guestimate’ someone’s work email address and even easier to find it on their LinkedIn profile.

3) Don’t talk just about your PhD

This might be a hard pill to swallow. Yes, you’re spending your life immersed in this and it is a hugely valuable asset (see below), but employers will also be keen to hear about other experiences. Can you demonstrate that you’re a self-starter outside of your degree? This doesn’t have to be completely unrelated to your university life and a great example could be establishing a society. By mentioning this, you show employers that you can use initiative within a variety of contexts.

4) If you have to talk about your PhD, repackage it

Okay, okay, this is exaggerative – of course you are going to want to (and should) talk about your studies. But when you speak to those outside the academic world, consider your audience carefully. Unless you’re planning on going into a niche industry, the specialist knowledge you’ve gained during your PhD isn’t of much interest to employers.

So what is? ALL the skills you’ve acquired along the way. We’re rarely taught to contemplate the new attributes we gain, but this is the most important thing you can do to market yourself well. Resources such as StrengthsFinder 2.0 can help you achieve this and make sure you stand out amongst an academic crowd.

5) Set clear goals

Networking isn’t the elusive art it’s made out to be. Like most things, it can be made more attainable by establishing goals. Qualify and quantify what you want to achieve! Next time you’re at a networking event, decide before what information you need; are you looking for guidance on getting an internship? Do you need to know what skills are most important in a certain industry? Giving thought to this will mean you’re able to ‘chat with a purpose’ and not end up on a tangent far from your original goal.

It’s also a good idea to consider how many people you want to connect with whilst at an event. It’s always going to be impossible to speak with everyone in the room, and it can be very easy to get engrossed in one conversation. Aim to building meaningful relationships with three or four people within an evening and be strategic about this – find out who’ll be attending and who’ll be most useful for you to engage with.

6) Follow up

Collecting business cards might make for a fun side-activity at conferences, but on its own it has no utility. Don’t sit by your phone waiting for the interesting manager you spoke to last week to call. They probably aren’t going to, but this doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t. Reach out to the contacts you make regularly and they will remember you over other people that they meet. Then when a suitable opportunity arises, you’ll be one of the first people they call.

7) LinkedIn is your friend; realise it!

A lot of people don’t seem to like LinkedIn. ‘Oh, but LinkedIn isn’t for academics’ I hear you say. This isn’t true, and even if it was, it doesn’t matter because it is for professionals. Dirk Kruger, who studied a PhD in Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering at KCL, was approached for a position through the site and is now employed as Executive Editor at BioMed Central. He therefore views it as a ‘valuable career tool’ and advises anyone looking to move away from academia to ‘get LinkedIn savvy’.

LinkedIn’s chief purpose is for networking, not for plain job-hunting. I’ve recently spoken to a number of PhD students and post-docs who consider the job function to be useless and often this is the case. It isn’t the best job board but this doesn’t mean that its other uses should be discredited too. Utilise it to keep new contacts warm, and to gain further insight into sectors that interest you. Joining relevant groups can be a great way to raise your profile and gain industry relevant knowledge.

If you’re a bit of a LinkedIn novice, don’t panic – you can learn more about how to use this site through our Grad School webinar series which can be accessed here.

8) ‘Be kind and be useful’

According to Barack Obama, these are the two things you should do in life to get ahead. It might seem at odds with the cut-throat corporate world you’re trying to break into, but remembering this whilst networking is important. Audacity is admirable up to a point, and then it’s just a bit annoying. We’ve all been at events where people have hounded speakers, and whilst we all remember them, it’s not necessarily for the right reasons.

Helping other people get what they want can really help you in getting what you want. Next time you meet a useful contact, consider how you could be useful to them. Do you know someone who might be able to help them with a problem they currently have? Is there an article that you read recently which relates to their work? Spread the love and see how it quickly comes back to you.

New online discussion platform for King’s PG students only!

Are you looking for ways to get in touch with other postgraduate students at King’s, to feel part of a wider King’s community?

If so, make the most of the on-line postgraduate networking groups on Yammer, private on-line social networking space launched by the Graduate School for all postgraduate students across King’s College London only.

Two groups – a postgraduate taught student network group and a postgraduate research student network group – now exist on Yammer and are designed to enable you to meet other like-minded postgraduate students, and to share ideas and information.

Though this is set up by the Graduate School it is entirely student-led, so you decide what you want to talk about.

Students will have already received an invitation to join their respective networking groups on Yammer. If you did not receive this and would like to get involved, or if you have any questions, please contact us at graduateschool@kcl.ac.uk.