Careers at a distance!

Those of you who can’t come into Waterloo for RDP workshops might like to book up for three webinars in early March.  Webinars are real-time online seminars; you just need a computer and internet connection and can take part wherever you happen to be sitting.  You can ask questions, interact with the trainer and open websites or documents as the seminar progresses.

Here’s what one of your colleagues said about the webinar he attended last year: ‘…the presentation as a webinar was excellent. It saved time looking for a seminar venue and I was able to log in and take part remotely (I was not on King’s campus). Although asking questions is a bit slower online – we we’re typing our questions in a chat box – this wasn’t much of an issue and I had all my questions answered (I had a few). Great session, basically!’

CVs for Academia and Outside

Learn what looks good on an academic CV and how to make the changes necessary if you’re pursuing a career elsewhere.

Date: Tuesday 1 March, 2016, 12 – 1pm

Register Now

Develop Your Brand: LinkedIn Profile Building and Career Research

LinkedIn is a massive database of people’s career journeys. Join this webinar to find out more about how to use it effectively in your career research, how to communicate with interesting contacts, and how to promote your own personal brand.

Date: Wednesday 9 March, 2016, 12 – 1pm

Register Now

Preparing for Interview

If you have understood the basic principles behind what employers are looking for, you’re half-way to being well-prepared for an interview. Join this webinar to develop this understanding and listen to some ‘poor’ and ‘better’ sample answers.

Date: Monday 14 March, 2016, 12 – 1pm

Register Now

 

Improving CVs for jobs inside and outside academia

Please sign up for this webinar (real-time, online seminar), next week.

This webinar will help you understand the basic outline of a CV, whether for academia or elsewhere. Join us to discover more and find further resources to help you with these tricky application documents

Date: Wed 21 Oct 1-2pm

Place: Your desk!

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4965284929083274498

Please forward this link to any King’s PhD or post-doc you know who might need help.

Need help with your CV? This might help!

We (think) we’ve managed to record yesterday’s webinar on CVs for academia or outside. Check this out.

The webinar covered principles you can apply to your own CV, from thinking about appropriate headings, fonts, formats as well as content and sections.  There is also a brief mention of how to create a cover letter or personal statement, with some useful resources at the end.

Feedback from one participant: ‘really relevant, intimate and more interactive than I expected’!

Improve your CV: ‘attend’ a webinar!

Researchers are always keen to improve their CV and cover letter, and can’t always find time to have an appointment with me to get feedback on their documents.

‘Attend’ this webinar and find out:

  • what recruiters are looking for in a CV
  • how to decide on a good format for your information
  • where to source some sample CVs and other help

Tuesday 2nd June, 12-1pm (British time!).

Please go to this link to register for the event:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/824086530469478402

Ten improvements you can make on your CV

In my travels across the various KCL campuses, I see a great number of PhD and post-doc CVs.  Some are great and I’ve very little to say about them.  Some are confusing, overly long and impossible to understand!

We all love a good list, so here are my ideas to help you improve your CV, based on things I’ve seen over my years of looking at your CVs. At the bottom of this post are some other resources to help you.

1) Use your name as the heading, not Curriculum Vitae!  Your CV is a tight, concise document and you need to find ways to save space, not waste lines on self-evident truths.  Similarly, be concise about your contact details: your address and email information really shouldn’t take more than a couple of lines.

2) Put your CV into a modern font.  Times New Roman is very very last century.  Take a look at it in something more modern and be impressed with how much more dynamic your experience looks.  Recruiters see so many CVs that details like these can really help affect the way they feel about you.

3)  Be a lot less complex about your degrees.  I have seen CVs where the candidate takes three lines to inform a reader about when and where and which degree they took.  A rule of thumb for layout would be: dates, degree and subject area, university.  Sometimes you’ll add in the country if you think that needs explanation.  You do not need the postal address of the department!  You might, for your PhD, decide that it is useful to include the names of your supervisors, if the people reading the CV are going to have heard of them.  If it’s a CV for a non-academic role, you are very unlikely to need this information.

4) Be extremely careful with your formatting.   Bold, italics, CAPITALS, underlining and different colours are all fine in their own way, but could be extremely distracting if overused.  Check carefully that your bullet points, indents and margins are consistently lined-up.  Some people put their CVs into a table format: if you do, make sure you hide the lines, and that when you print it out, there is sufficient space between your sections.

5)  Think carefully about how much academic language you use.  If you are applying for an academic job or grant, then of course your CV needs to demonstrate your competence in these areas.  But if you are not applying for an academic role, then decide how much you need to say about the particular technical aspects of your current post.  Probably the best way to check this is to show your CV to a friend who doesn’t know anything about your research and watch their faces carefully when they’re reading it…..

6)  Decide which headings to use.    Headings help to break up the CV and make it easier to read.  Academic CVs need to have section headings such as Research, Teaching and Academic Admin, and your publications and conferences attended will fit neatly in there.  But CVs for outside of academia will want to use headings such as Relevant Experience, Research Experience, Other Experience, and so on, matching the heading according to the kind of job you are going for.

7)  Be very sure what job you’re applying for.  Your CV needs to change according to the job description or person specification of the specific role.  Even an academic CV might need to be juggled about according to the priorities listed in these documents – for example, one university might have Teaching above Research, and want you to include Media engagements, while another might switch areas around.  Your CV needs to match as closely as it can with the priorities of the role, even to the extent sometimes of using the same language the recruiters are using (‘interpersonal skills’ rather than ‘communication skills’, for example).

8)  Make a decision about including information about your transferable skills.  An academic CV will probably not need so much information about these; but a CV for a role outside of academia needs to really demonstrate that your PhD or post-doc roles have given you loads of skills that are directly transferable.  This is why you may not want a list of your publications, for example, but instead use them as evidence of strong communication skills, writing for different audiences, or even of project management – having to submit on time.  For more information about this, take a look at this post:  http://blogs.kcl.ac.uk/kclgradschool/2013/07/22/your-cv-are-you-really-getting-yourself-across-to-an-employer/

9)  Think active, strong language.  What have you achieved?  What did you initiate?  Where did you succeed, overcome difficulties, assess, notice, decide and so on?  Having interesting language on your CV makes it easier to read and create a better impression in that brief moment of attention in a recruiter’s mind.

10)  Make sure you know who your referees are.  You will probably list two names, job titles and email addresses (not all CVs will need these, as you may submit these details in another format).  Recruitment happens very quickly these days and it is helpful to have the referees’ details to hand.  Have you yet talked to your supervisor or PI about acting as a referee?  Perhaps there is someone else you’ll ask.  These things take time to set up so it’s as well to have thought early on who you’ll approach.

Use these tips and your CV will look and feel like a more dynamic document!

For further help, log into www.vitae.ac.uk (use your KCL email address) and check out the Career section with its list of CVs.  They’re not perfect (apply these 10 tips to them and see where they could improve!) but a good start if you’re faced with a blank page.

 

45 minutes to create a better CV…..

What are you doing tomorrow lunchtime?

Work?

Sit at your desk?

Munch your lunch?

Chat to your friends?

Do all these things, and more, while listening to the Graduate School Careers Consultant help you create a better CV.

When:  tomorrow!  Yes, by the end of lunchtime, you could have a better CV…..

Where: at your desk!  No, you don’t have to leave your campus….

How: check out the links here: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/school/RDP/training-and-development/RDP-Webinars.aspx

Look forward to ‘meeting’ you then.

BCG Consulting event… sign ups close tomorrow morning

See my post last week about this event – I had a chat with the recruiter this morning and BCG is really interested in early career researchers applying.  Plus you get to join at a higher level than undergrads (and therefore have a salary uplift….)!

Two main pitfalls she observes in early career researcher applications:

1) Not having a short, sharp CV.  It should be one page and very achievement-focussed.  CVs are initially screened by recruitment team and then staff with PhDs would look at them.  They are not interested in lists of publications and conferences unless these are useful to show eg ‘chosen to speak at a conference out of 50 other researchers’.  You need context which might be facts and figures.

2) Not knowing how to tackle case study interviews.  Practise practise practise!  They are interested in your thought process, your ability to see the overall picture (not the more PhD-typical detail), and your ability to do maths on the spot.

They are keen to hear from ECRs across all subject areas and are trying to raise their profile at KCL – let me know how it goes!

See here for the post and sign up details.

 

Graduate & Mature Student Society Careers and Networking Evening

Join other graduates from across King’s for an evening of informal networking. Enjoy free food and drinks while speakers will give advice on working life after graduating.

KCLSU’s Vice President for Representation and Communication, Anthony Shaw, and UCLU’s Postgraduate Students’ Officer, Ben Towse, will be talking about how the Students’ Union can help you to develop your skills and boost your CV in preparation for facing the world of work. Professor Vaughan Robinson, Director of the Graduate School, will also be talking about the opportunities open to graduate students.

So if you fancy meeting other graduate students and picking up some useful tips for the future, please join us at Waterfront Bar & Kitchen from 7pm on Tuesday 18th of February.

All graduate students are welcome to attend.

Last chance for CV help in 2013!

From the comfort of your own computer, PhDs and post-docs can attend a course that will enable you to improve your CV. Using several sample CVs, we will look at the form and structure of a CV so that you can decide what you need to include to best market your experiences to an employer.

We will briefly consider the structure of a cover letter, and you will be signposted to
resources that can help you further.

11 December 2013, 4.30 – 5.15pm
To book a place on this webinar please sign up here

Trainer: Kate Murray