Pre-Consultancy Training Workshop: 9 May

Tuesday, 9 May 2017
10:00 – 15:30
S3.31, Strand Campus

King’s PhD students who are interested in consultancy work but who are unsure as to whether they have the skills for it, are invited to the next pre-consultancy training workshop on Tuesday 9 May.

Please find the agenda below.

10 – 10:45 Preparing your Application  Donald Lush, Careers Consultant
 10:45 – 11:30 Working for yourself  Donald Lush, Careers Consultant
 11:30 – 11:45 King’s Research Consultancy – Programme Overview  Katie Black/Jon Sanders, Careers & Employability
11:45 – 12:15 Working as a Consultant – What to Expect
12:15 – 12:45 My King’s Research Consultancy Project  Aine Rubikaite, Final Year PhD Candidate, Developmental Neurobiology, IoPPN
 12:45 – 13:30 Lunch Break
 13:30 – 15:30 Project Management, Dealing with Client Issues and Presenting your Conclusions  Dr Ross English – Researcher Development Unit

To book a place on this workshop, please email careers-consultancy@kcl.ac.uk, or call 020 7848 1376.

About the King’s Research Consultancy
The King’s Research Consultancy is a programme offering PhDs (post-upgrade) the opportunity to consult on a specific research project within a department at King’s College London, or with an external organisation.

You can benefit from this scheme by:

  • Gaining advanced levels of work-based experiential learning and build on research, analytical and project management skills.
  • Having access to pre-consultancy training and support from King’s Careers & Employability, if required.
  • Having the opportunity to apply your PhD subject knowledge to a commercial project, impacting significantly and tangibly on organisational or departmental outcomes.

2 day Paid Internship Opportunity – to start ASAP

King's Research Consultancy (150x50)The Project

This is a desk-based project to compare the levels and learning outcomes of modules from King’s, the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and Arizona State University (ASU) in Public Health, Global Health and Social Medicine. The project will require the researcher to interrogate the information which is currently held by the Project Manager.

The key deliverable for this project will be a report highlighting what is comparable between King’s global / public health modules and programmes, and those on offer from PLuS partners ASU and UNSW.

No travel will be required for this project. The work can be completed remotely, but could also be based out of the International office (Strand campus) based on the candidate’s preferences.

The outcome for this piece of work will be an understanding of how existing modules might fit together to form a new joint undergraduate degree offering in public health, and where there are gaps.

Person Specification

  • You must be a current, post upgrade PhD student at King’s College London
  • Good analytical skills are essential
  • You must be able to start ASAP

Further details and how to apply

The project will commence ASAP and will consist of 2 days’ work. The consultant will be paid £125 per day.

Click here for full details

 

Professional Futures, 16 November 2016 – Think you don’t need to network? Here’s why you do.

network-586177_640Our speaker:

Dr Triona Bolger, whose PhD was in Craniofacial Developmental Biology, is now a Managing Consultant in the Life Science Practice at Navigant Consulting with a strong interest in EU/Emerging Market commercial strategy for both speciality and big pharma.

Here are Triona’s top thoughts about networking and how to be a successful networker:

  1. Words that come to mind when thinking about networking:
  • Elevator pitch
  • Selling yourself
  • Awkward forced conversation
  • Schmoozing
  • Working a room
  • Speed dating.
  1. All of these things can seem like barriers to a useful conversation.
  2. Networking is nothing more than making connections with people – be interested, be present and be honest. Talk openly about the things that you are passionate about, ask engaging questions and truly listen to the answers. People seek connections and respond well to honest and open conversations.
  3. Networking shouldn’t mean that you are false or behave in a manner that isn’t yourself – this comes across as fake and people will close off .
  4. The purpose of networking varies so try and be open to opportunities – you may be looking for a new flat mate, funding, a job, inspiration, a collaborator and many other things.
  5. You can network anywhere – the residents lounge of your building, at parties, sports, on-line, on a flight.
  6. Generally, I don’t network with purpose, I just try to pay attention to who people are and chat, but this is my approach. Others need to be more studied and others are more gregarious.
  7. Be true to yourself – if you aren’t outgoing and able to introduce yourself, then don’t go to events where you have to put yourself out there. Work out a networking style that works for you.
  8. Identify your ‘party personality’ – are you the centre of the party? Are you holding up the wall, are you chatting in the kitchen in a smaller group, are you making yourself useful clearing up after other? Know yourself and find ways to talk to people that work for you
  9. What do you want to be known for? What do you need / want to know about others? Try to work out your answers to the following:
  • Do you have to be purposeful vs. passive?
  • What is your story?
  • Who is the other person?
  1. Keep in touch with the connections you make through messages, emails or personal contact.

Calling all NMS PhDs and Research Staff! New employers added to your careers event

NMS Careers Day posterSign up here!

What will you get out of attending this event?

  • Inspiration as to paths people with NMS PhDs take after they’ve completed (all our employer guests have PhDs)
  • An overview of the market for people with your kind of PhD or research experience
  • Information, advice and guidance from experienced employers
  • Experience of talking to a range of employers (though they are not here to recruit!)
  • Challenges to your current career thinking!
  • Opportunity to get your CV checked.

More employers added, including Cisco, AWE, Elekta (medical physics), Capco (consulting), GORS and IBM.

Looking forward to meeting you soon!

New Research Consultancy project for PhD students

As part of the King’s Research Consultancy, the King’s Learning Institute and Department of Informatics are currently seeking a post-upgrade PhD student to undertake qualitative research and analysis as part of a project that aims to improve the learning of first year Computer Science students.

Person Specification

  • You must be a current, post upgrade PhD student at King’s College London
  • You might be particularly suited to this project if you are from the Department of Education and Professional Studies
  • Background/experience in educational research and qualitative research methods
  • Experience with semi-structured interviews and other qualitative research methods

The consultant will start ASAP, and will work for 1 day a week (6 hours a day) for 6 months. The consultant will be paid £125 per day.

To find out more, please visit the King’s Internships portal: http://recruit.thecareersgroup.co.uk/KingsCollege/Vacancies/VacancyDetails.asp?VacancyID=3981

Recruiting! Practise Case Interview for Management Consulting Application

Are you a current KCL PhD or post-doc, also looking for opportunities in management consulting? Would you like to join in a group of enthusiasts to practise case interview (PRACTICE is very important to ace your case interview)?

How it works: Each 4 people will be randomly assigned into a group and they meet up once a week for 2-3 hours; two of them in a pair each time and one person gives the other a case, while the other two watch the process and provide feedback. We rotate members in each group so you have a new interviewer each week! We will also have an industry insider comments on the structure of your answer and the way you deliver the answer at some point.

About me: I am a third year PhD candidate at KCL

Contact me: Drop me a message by email – Jiabao.sun@kcl.ac.uk and please include a short paragraph about your studies and kinds of industries you are interested in.

 

 

Nutrition/Biochem Research Consultancy Project with LUHV

LUHV is a startup drinks company offering healthy juices and drinks in range of flavours. They want to enable consumers to understand what they put into their bodies and support better choices.

Chris Beech has over 15 years in the Drinks industry and strong links with Brands such as Heineken. LUHV are planning to launch this autumn and are already closely working with organisations and brands to make this a reality.

The Project
LUHV are inviting two King’s College London students to lead out a vital phase of the drinks’ creation.

LUHV are looking for a Nutrition/Biochem Consultant to work with their team to create five juice flavour combinations for their product and to explore, devise and test ingredients for the brand’s first five drinks (each scheduled to launch to the UK market in later this year).

What’s in it for you? It’s a well paid position where you’ll be entertained, engaged and extremely valued, as well as enjoying a defining role in the launch of a new drinks company.

Person Specification

  • Passionate about food & drink
  • Qualification considered a bonus
  • Ability to work as part of team and on own
  • Confidence in making recommendations
  • Able to work in a startup environment
  • Able to meet deadlines

What will the Consultant gain from the internship?
You will be working as part of a small but experienced team, and the role will be a great opportunity to be involved in a company from the very beginning, steering how LUHV works and actually impacting the products that are sold. And the door will always be open to working together in the future.

Further details and how to apply
The project will commence as soon as possible after the closing date on a minimum of 2 days per week. The consultant will be paid £125 per day and will work remotely, with minimal supervision.

Please visit the King’s Internships & Consultancy webpage to apply with your CV and a tailored cover letter explaining why LUHV couldn’t do this without you. Address your cover letter to Mr Chris Beech, Director.

The application closing deadline is midnight on Wednesday 17th June.

Please email katie.black@kcl.ac.uk or call 020 7848 1376 if you have any questions. Good luck!

Careers in Management Consultancy … notes from the Career Spotlight 28 January  

Contributed by Laura Mackenzie, Head of King’s Careers & Employability

Last Wednesday saw the latest in our series of Career Spotlight events for research students. The focus was on management consultancy and the following speakers attended to talk about their transition from a PhD to consulting roles:

  • Lauren Carter, Pete Colman and Sophie Decelle – Simon-Kucher & Partners
  • Fahd Choudhry – Deloitte
  • Nathan Cope – PA Consulting

So what does the work entail?  

Pete Colman started by talking about the work of Simon Kucher and Partners, a specialist strategy consultancy which he described as ‘entrepreneurial and partner owned’ and operating across the globe (currently 760 employees in 29 offices worldwide). Specialisms include strategy, pricing, sales and marketing, with an extensive client list ranging across sectors. Pete talked through some example projects around pricing power including:

  • Analysis of consumer travel data to find the optimum price for a travelcard offering discounts to the traveller whilst ensuring profit for the operator
  • Determining the market price for a branded pharmaceutical treatment

Next up was Nathan from PA Consulting. Larger than Simon Kucher, PA employs 2,500 people globally and operates across 10 different practice areas, with a wider consulting brief. Nathan is based in the life sciences and healthcare practice which focuses on the commercial aspects of the pharma industry.

Examples of recent PA projects across all areas:

  • delivering an air-traffic system to safely handle 600,000 aeroplanes over Denmark each year
  • working with the Bank of England to create the Prudential Regulation Authority, which will transform financial regulation in the UK
  • developing a system to restore power more quickly and improve the customer experience for households and businesses in Washington, US

The range of sector-based practice areas means specialisation is possible, and the company does offer opportunities for those interested in R&D or using their technical skills.

Finally, Fahd spoke about his experiences working with Deloitte. His projects to date have focused on the financial services sector and included:

  • the implementation of a major IT system for a global retail and investment bank
  • the integration of processes across two large companies following a merger
  • the introduction of a new trading platform for a large investment bank .

‘Consulting is basically a people business’ – what are the core skills required?

Pete Colman described consulting as a people business which is mostly about influencing and persuading; whilst Nathan summarised the two key traits needed to be a successful consultant as a deep knowledge and interest in your subject area and the ability to build and sustain relationships. Lauren highlighted the differences between going into a company as a consultant where your colleagues are the delivery team, and going in to project manage an in-house team who may have a very different working style to your own. Echoing these themes Fahd highlighted that good consultants need to be able to:

  • communicate across technical and non-technical areas to ensure all stakeholders are engaged
  • distil complex information and convey it clearly to the client
  • work with a range of different personalities
  • adapt to change
  • gain credibility in a new sector or subject area quickly

Making the transition – how to get into consultancy

Recognising an interest in the broader, business elements of your research work seemed to be a common starting point, followed by exposure to the role through internships or networking. Nathan did an internship with a drug discovery company towards the end of his PhD where he was part of the group responsible for deciding on potential R&D projects to invest in. He enjoyed the business focus, the opportunities provided for analysing data and problem solving to achieve tangible results and the fact the role involved working with people much more than he had been used to in the lab.

Networking is important as is approaching firms directly since some consulting firms offer structured internship programmes but many will take interns on an ad hoc basis without advertising. Fahd had already gained industry experience in pharma before his PhD and decided that consulting would be a good next step to utilise his knowledge and experience. He expected to work across the life sciences sector but instead has spent the last few years working across banking and financial services.

Entry points for PhD graduates or post-docs vary depending on the type of firm, its training and development programmes and the level of experience of the researcher. Fahd highlighted the challenge of starting on a graduate development programme alongside first degree graduates; but also the value of receiving structured training and building a network of colleagues at the start of your career.

How to decide which firm

Some of the themes that emerged from the presentations included:

  • Specialist vs general : – what sort of projects do you want to work on and how specialist do you want to become?
  • Size of firm and growth projection: check out the size of the company, how it has grown in the last couple of years and where it’s development areas seem to be
  • How technical: if you want to continue to use some of the technical knowledge from your research then you might have to look harder for the right kind of consultancy.
  • Level of entry: whilst starting with recent graduates might not seem appealing, consider the training on offer from the firm and the opportunities a structured programme might offer for networking and skills development at a fast pace

 ‘Having a PhD won’t make you stand out’

All of the speakers emphasised that consulting firms will be used to receiving quality applications from well qualified graduates so having a PhD in itself will not be a differentiator. However, the speakers had experienced rapid progression following entry which they attributed to the skills developed from their PhD  – the most prominent of which were:

  • project management
  • presentation skills
  • logical approach to problem solving
  • the ability to convey complex information in a clear way

In addition the resilience often needed to complete a PhD was recognised, which is a huge advantage in a client-driven industry where change is the norm, and the credibility factor of being a PhD graduate when working with clients.

Don’t assume the PhD will sell itself was the key advice. The importance of demonstrating on CVs and applications the specific skills and experiences you have to offer was stressed, as well as being able to evidence genuine interest in business and the way in which organisations work. Nathan highlighted the value of demonstrating project management and leadership skills outside the PhD project whether through internships, volunteering or involvement in student-led activities on campus.

Interested in finding out more?

Good for introductions to the landscape and key players:

Details of the firms represented:

King’s Research Consultancy

KRC-Cropped-430x292

The King’s Research Consultancy is a new programme offering PhD (post-upgrade) or post-doctoral researchers the opportunity to consult on a specific research project within a King’s department or external organisation.

  • Gain advanced levels of work-based experiential learning and build on research, analytical and project management skills.
  • Have access to pre-consultancy training and support from King’s Careers & Employability, if required. Please see below for further details.
  • Be given the opportunity to apply your PhD subject knowledge to a commercial project, impacting significantly and tangibly on organisational or departmental outcomes.

If you are interested in the programme but unsure as to whether you have the skills for consultancy work, please book onto the Preparing for King’s Research Consultancy Projects  workshop on Tuesday 27 January 2015. The session will be held from 10:00 – 15:00 at Waterloo campus, James Clerk Maxwell Building B.16, and will cover:

  • Preparing your CV
  • Project management
  • Beginning a consultancy project
  • Dealing with client issues
  • Time management
  • Presenting your conclusions

To book a place at the workshop, please email katie.black@kcl.ac.uk. There are only 30 places available and you must have achieved at least post-upgrade status in your PhD to attend.

Further details and eligibility criteria can be found on the Intranet