King’s IoPPN Clinician Investigator Scholarship 2017

The King’s IoPPN Clinician Investigator Scholarship was established in January 2017, through a generous philanthropic donation, to support masters and PhD scholarships in the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). The IoPPN is a leading centre for mental health and related neurosciences research in Europe. It is one of the top 25 higher education institutions in the world, and ranked 1st in Europe for Psychiatry & Psychology.

What is the King’s IoPPN Clinician Investigator Scholarship?

The scholarships are aimed at encouraging current MBBS students and GKT Medical School Alumni to pursue research in the area of mental health and neurosciences. This scholarship will be awarded based on merit.

The scholarships are available for all full-time Home/EU fee status students undertaking masters and PhD programmes in the IoPPN, starting in Sept 2017.

Each student will receive a £20,000 scholarship, for the duration of their studies, per year.

Am I eligible?

For the Masters’ Programmes, applicants must:

  • be planning to undertake a MSc at the IoPPN or have firmly accepted an offer of a place;
  • be a graduate of GKT School of Medicine or its affiliates, or if an undergraduate, must have completed at least 3 years of their MBBS course, and have undertaken a clinical attachment in either psychiatry or neurology;
  • agree to provide an end of year report and a letter of thanks to the donor and attend events where necessary.
  • provide a written personal statement (up to 1000 words) including:
  • why they wish to undertake this course of study;
  • an example of a piece of academic work (e.g. a scientific publication or clinical report) that they have undertaken;
  • evidence of strong academic ability

For the PhD/MD (Res) Programmes, applicants must:

  • have firmly accepted an offer of a studentship at the IoPPN or have had a proposal for a PhD or MD(Res) approved by the relevant KCL/IoPPN Higher Degrees committee:
  • be a graduate of GKT School of Medicine, or be about to graduate, or be an intercalating MBBS student at GKT (PhD only)
  • agree to provide end of year reports annually during the course of their study and a letter of thanks to the donor on completion of their degree and attend events where necessary
  • provide an outline of their research proposal
  • provide a written personal statement (up to 1500 words) including:
  • why they wish to undertake a research degree in the fields of psychiatry/psychology/neuroscience
  • an example of a piece of academic work (eg a scientific publication or clinical report) that they have undertaken
  • evidence of strong academic ability

How do I apply?

Download an application form.

The application form should be completed, scanned and emailed to funding@kcl.ac.uk.

Alternatively it may be posted to Student Funding Office.

You must submit word/pdf versions of your supporting statement and research proposal. These should be emailed to funding@kcl.ac.uk.

The deadline for applications is 30 June2017.

When will I know the outcome of my application?

Provided your application form has been accurately completed and the appropriate documentary evidence supplied, you will be notified of the decision by 31 July 2017.

Deposits are not required until a decision has been made on the scholarships, unsuccessful scholarship candidates will need to pay their programme deposit within two weeks of the outcome.

Where can I get further information?

To find out more about the Scholarship scheme, please contact the Student Funding Office.

 

‘The best careers event ever…': case studies from the NMS careers day

Listening attentively to a speaker

Listening attentively to a speaker

The NMS Careers Day this week was a great success, with 60 PhDs and post-docs attending and listening to ten employers talk about their transition from PhD and post-doc onwards.

Key learning points from our opening speaker, Robert Bowles from the Royal Society of Chemistry:

 

  • Industry is changing – look at SMEs as well as large corporates as they are outsourcing much of their R&D
  • Use the professional body for your sector area (eg Royal Societies and Institutes – eg see IMA for maths, RSC (Chemistry), IOP (Physics) and so on) for networking, jobs, other opportunities, and news
  • Your subject matter may not be what gets you recruited, but instead the high level analytical skills you bring – consider your values and interests when thinking about moving on.

Steffen Zschaler, Senior Lecturer at King’s, talked about his role as an academic.

  • Remember that PhDs from other countries have more time to be building a CV, as their PhDs take longer.  Other countries might consider a 3/4 year UK PhD to be pretty short.  How will you write about it in your application?
  • What do academics actually do?  Steffen spends less than a third of his time conducting ‘research’ – he tries to steal some research time from his teaching and admin, but it is tricky.  A good third of his time is spent in administrative tasks, and there is a lot of marking involved in the large subject cohorts.
  • The best thing about the role is the freedom it brings.

Parimal Patel – Schroders

Parimal began his academic career at the University of Leicester, graduating in 2002 with an MPhys in Astrophysics. After completing a PhD in this topic in Nottingham, in 2006 Parimal made the transition into the corporate world, becoming an analyst, for Standard Bank plc. In this role Parimal was able to put his studies to use, particularly with regard to developing pricing models and analysis. Since 2013, he has been operating in risk analysis at Schroders.

Adele Julien – Researchers in Schools

Adele is in the third year of her PhD at The Open University. Her PhD research focuses on pollen-vegetation relationships in Ghana and pollen wall chemistry. This work helps to inform the interpretation of the pollen fossil record, which in turn aids our understanding of climate change over time. Alongside her studies, Adele is actively involved with The Brilliant Club, the organisation that oversees the Researchers in Schools initiative. Adele works closely with the RIS Head Office team to educate organisations and institutions about the scheme, which places PhDs in secondary schools as trainee teachers whilst allowing them to maintain a research profile.  She also regularly speaks about the research that is produced through the initiative within universities. She has also experienced what it’s like to be on placement through the RIS program.

Neal O’Riain – Pivigo

Neal is the Community Manager at Pivigo, a data science training and recruiting company. Originally from Ireland, Neal has a PhD in Astrophysics from Trinity College, Dublin, and in his research career he worked on modelling the atmospheres of stars. During his time in academia he was heavily involved in science engagement and education. He is the founder of Student2Scientist, a science education initiative funded by Google and SFI, aimed at introducing computing centrally in the Irish STEM curriculum. At Pivigo Neal’s role is to support PhDs in their transition from academia to jobs in Data Science.

Jassel Majevadia – IBM

A scientist by training, Jassel completed a PhD on the fracture properties of materials for nuclear applications, where she worked within the faculties of metallurgy, mechanical engineering and condensed matter theory. It was here that Jassel first developed her programming skills using C++, Fortran, Python and SQL. This experience supported her in making her transition into the commercial realm, and at current her work at IBM is focused on delivering Proof of Concepts for cross-industry analytical solutions. At Imperial College London, Jassel founded an international summer school and conference on materials science and communications and also participated in a significant amount of science communication work, including presenting on the Discovery channel. Jassel is a passionate advocate of disseminating academic science within the public realm and regularly speaks for organisations such as Soapbox Science.

Karola Graupner & Alexei Mulko – Government Operations Research Scheme

Karola currently acts as an Operational Researcher at the Ministry of Justice, where she is involved in analysing statistics relating to the Criminal Justice system. Her academic background sits in physics, and she completed her PhD at Queen’s University Belfast. Following on from her studies, Karola continued to operate in a HE setting both as a Research Associate at Loughborough and as Assistant Laboratory Manager and the University of Oxford. She also holds a PGCE, and thus her varied background means that she is happy to advise people from a range of perspectives when it comes to answering the question What’s next? following the completion of your PhD.

Alexei holds a PhD in Mathematics from the Lobachevski State University (Russia). His area of research was systems of differential equations with periodic functions, existence of limit cycles and stationary points and analytical structure of the systems’ first integrals. Prior to this, Alexei completed an MSc in Financial Engineering from Birkbeck, where his area of research was commodities and commodity derivatives pricing. Within GORS, he worked as an operational researcher at the Department for Education (DfE) and later – Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). He is the leading analyst in carbon pricing at DECC and his work consists of developing pricing models and providing modelling advice across the government as well as driving the EU ETS policy development via analysis, impact assessments and engagement with the government and external stakeholders.

Judith McMarron – Elekta

Judith acts as functional lead within her team at Elekta and also works closely with the company’s Regulatory and Quality Assurance group. Prior to her commercial career, Judith studied a wide range of core physics and maths at The University of Manchester before moving onto The University of Edinburgh where she completed her PhD in Elementary Particle Physics, which was part of a project with CERN.

Stephen Harrison – Capco

As a consultant within the Innovation & Digital practises at Capco, Stephen delivers large complex programs that intersect innovation, strategy, technology and financial services. Stephen has been lead developer and product owner for a number of pieces of software, including both mobile and web-based applications for retail banks and internally at Capco. He is also part of the Digital R&D team, exploring new and leading-edge technologies such as machine learning, Blockchain and big data analysis. He has a 1:1 in Astrophysics, and a PhD in Theoretical Physics, both from University College London.

Notes by Aimee Wilde, Employer Engagement Officer, King’s Careers & Employability

Join our global online community: King’s Connect!

You often hear the expression it’s not what you know, it’s who you know. At King’s we are not only focused on your academic learning but with our new online community, we now want to help build your network of influencers. Within this platform you will be able to search for alumni located all around the world in order to establish a connection with them.

King’s Connect will support your professional path; develop your network and give you access to the guidance and experience of successful alumni. You can search alumni by subject area, course studied, employer and location. Once you have found an alumnus that could be a good match you can request to become their mentee. When the match has been accepted, you can connect with your mentor to define the goals and expectations for your mentoring journey.

This is a wonderful opportunity to benefit from the King’s global alumni network. Guidance is provided by the King’s Alumni Office throughout the programme.

How to apply to become a part of King’s Connect?

Easily! Fill out this form by and sign-up to an interview time slot (Interviews will take place from Monday 12 October to Wednesday 21 October)

If you have any questions, please email mentoring@kcl.ac.uk for support.

We hope you make the most of this unique opportunity and we look forward to welcoming you to King’s Connect.

Leaving the Ivory Tower

A guest blog by Pahini Pandya, King’s Innovation Forum, PhD candidate in the Randall Division

Building on the success of their first annual networking event in 2014, King’s College London Innovation Forum (KCLIF) staged a second instalment of ‘Leaving the Ivory Tower’ this year, drawing in researchers from across King’s.

‘Leaving the Ivory Tower’ is a networking event that aims to shed light on potential career opportunities outside academia for early career researchers. Built to encourage intimate and meaningful conversation, the evening involved expert speakers from a wide range of industries hosting short discussions with participants in small focus groups.

Ivory Tower June 15_2 (reduced size)This year’s function kicked off with a brilliant opening speech from Professor Vaughan Robinson, Director of the Graduate School at Kings’s, followed by round table discussions with speakers from seven different sectors including a number of King’s alumni.

Dr Caroline Benn (Principal Scientist, Pfizer Regenerative Medicine) and Dr Gayle Chapman (Monitoring Officer, Innovate UK) discussed aspects of transitioning into industry, innovation and entrepreneurship.

Useful insights into the world of scientific publishing and writing came from Dr Alessia Ericco (Associate editor, Nature Reviews) and Dr Eleanor Roberts (Director, Beeline Science Communications), while Dr Bryn James and Simon Quick enlightened the participants on careers in teaching.

Consultants Dr Shani Thilak (Navitas consulting), Dr Fahd Choudhry and Dr Sean Song (Deloitte) helped attendees understand careers in healthcare and life science consulting.Careers in patenting were enthusiastically advocated by Dr John Fisher (Senior Associate, Carpmaels Ransford LLP) and Dr Eleanor Macvier (Patent assistant, Mewburn Ellis LLP).

Ivory Tower June 15_1 (reduced size)Top take home messages included tailoring your C.V. to the specific industry, visiting the career’s consultants and networking.

A highlight of the evening was the dynamic networking session between the speakers and participants that followed the discussions. The event was well received by the audience and has grown since last year with generous support from the Graduate School and Careers & Employability teams.

For more information please visit King’s College London Innovation Forum webpage.

 

 

 

 

Be part of a new mentoring platform: King’s Connect!

At King’s we are not only focused on your academic development, we also want to help build your network of influencers. This is why the King’s Alumni office have launched a new online community. Within this platform you will be able to search for alumni located all around the world in order to establish a mentoring relationship with them.

King’s Connect will support your professional path; develop your network and give you access to the guidance and experience of successful alumni. You can search alumni by subject area, employer and location.

Once you have found an alumnus that might be a good match you can request to become their mentee. When the match has been accepted, you can connect with your mentor to define the goals and expectations for your mentoring journey.

As a PGR student at King’s, you also have the option of developing new skills by acting as mentor to current undergraduate students.

This is a wonderful opportunity to benefit from the King’s global alumni network. Guidance and support is provided by the King’s Alumni office throughout the programme.

Find out more and apply to become a part of King’s Connect
Come along to our information session for PGR students to find out more from the King’s Alumni Office team about joining the King’s Connect Mentoring Scheme, and the benefits of mentoring for research students with Dr Ross English from the Researcher Development Unit, on Wednesday 25th of March, 14.30–15.30 in JCMB. Book your place now:http://kingsconnectpgrsession.eventbrite.co.uk

In order to apply for the scheme, students are asked to fill out the application form. After students have completed the application form they will be directed to a remote interview process. We will then be in touch to let them know of the outcome and providing them details to register on the platform.

Mentoring requirements

  • Mentors will be required to commit to 1-3 hours a month per mentoring relationship as well as attending two events annually.
  • Mentees will be required to commit 4-6 hours a month to the mentoring relationship as well as attending two events annually.

Upcoming events

Any questions?
Contact Maria Gutierrez, Alumni Volunteer Officer at maria.1.gutierrez@kcl.ac.uk or 020 7848 2123.

Tadion Rideal Prize Winner Announced

Bezapic3The Tadion Rideal Prize has been awarded to Dr Chibeza Agley, from the Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences (CHAPS), for his thesis titled: ‘Assessment of cell fate and the role of Wnt-β-catenin signalling in human primary skeletal muscle-derived cells’. The thesis was carried out under the supervision of Professor Steve Harridge and Professor Phillipa Francis-West.

“For my doctoral research at King’s College London, I took on the problem of adult human muscle stem cell multilineage potential (i.e. the ability of a stem cell to give rise to more than one cell type), which had been a hotly debated topic in the field for many years. Continue reading