EURIAS Postdoc Fellowships – Call for Applications

2018 – 2019 EURIAS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMME

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Researchers from King’s College London are invited to apply for the EURIAS Postdoctoral Fellowship, for 2018/2019.

The European Institutes for Advanced Study (EURIAS) Fellowship Programme is an international researcher mobility programme offering 10-month residencies in one of the 19 participating Institutes: Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Bologna, Budapest, Cambridge, Delmenhorst, Edinburgh, Freiburg, Helsinki, Jerusalem, Lyon, Madrid, Marseille, Paris, Uppsala, Vienna, Warsaw, Zürich.

The Institutes for Advanced Study support the focused, self-directed work of outstanding
researchers. The fellows benefit from the finest intellectual and research conditions and from the stimulating environment of a multi-disciplinary and international community of first-rate scholars.

EURIAS Fellowships are mainly offered in the fields of the humanities and social sciences but may also be granted to scholars in life and exact sciences, provided that their proposed research project does not require laboratory facilities and that it interfaces with humanities and social sciences. The diversity of the 19 participating IAS offers a wide range of possible research contexts in Europe for worldwide scholars. Applicants may select up to three IAS outside their country of nationality or residence as possible host institutions.

The Programme welcomes applications worldwide from promising young scholars as well as from leading senior researchers. The EURIAS selection process has proven to be highly competitive. To match the Programme standards, applicants have to submit a solid and innovative research proposal, to demonstrate the ability to forge beyond disciplinary
specialisation, to show an international commitment as well as quality publications in high-impact venues.

The EURIAS Consortium welcomes applications from scholars at risk.

For the 2018-2019 academic year, EURIAS offers 54 fellowships (26 junior and 28 senior
positions). All IAS have agreed on common standards, including the provision of a living allowance (in the range of € 26,000 for a junior fellow and € 38,000 for a senior fellow), accommodation (or a mobility allowance), a research budget, plus coverage of travel expenses.

APPLICATION
– Applications are submitted online via www.eurias-fp.eu, where, you will find detailed
information regarding the content of the application, eligibility criteria, and selection procedure.
– Application period: May 5th, 2017 → June 7th, 2017 (4pm GMT)
– Late applications will not be considered.

SELECTION PROCEDURE
– Scientific assessment by two international reviewers
– Pre-selection by the international EURIAS Scientific Committee
– Final selection by the IAS Academic Boards
– Publication of results: January 2018
For further information on the Programme, please consult our website: www.eurias-fp.eu
For further information on the IAS and their specific working conditions: www.eurias-fp.eu/ias

Join the EURIAS Fellowship Programme on facebook & LinkedIn.

How to peer review a paper: Elsevier training session

How to peer review a paper

Thursday 11 May

New Hunts House Lecture Theatre 2, Guy’s Campus

15:00-17:00

Leading scientific publishers Elsevier are coming to King’s once more to deliver a session for researchers (postgraduate or staff).

This researcher development session will provide:

elsevier-logo

  • An opportunity to hear about the process of reviewing papers from one of best known scientific publishers
  • A chance to speak with current journal editors about the peer review process.

Elsevier mainly publish scientific journals, so these sessions will have a science focus. However. this session is open to researchers from any discipline wishing to deepen their knowledge of the publication and peer review process.

Secure your place now by follow this link to the KCL Skills Forge booking page: https://goo.gl/ptvLhu.

To find more courses for researchers, explore the Researcher Development pages to find training opportunities in Public Engagement and Communication, Writing and Publishing Skills, Online Courses and IT, and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight Series: Science Beyond Academia Nora McFadden – Science Procurement Manager, The Crick Institute

Nora’s career in science started with her undergraduate degree in medical microbiology at Warwick which she followed by jumping straight to a PhD at Imperial College.

After working as a post-doc she realised that she didn’t want to be a PI and couldn’t see a future for herself in lab-based academic research.

She moved initially to lab management at CRUK as the Crick was being developed and it was made clear to her that progression within her role would be possible. She became involved in procurement for the Institute as it was being built and works there currently, managing the purchasing of supplies and equipment for a large and complex institution.

Nora emphasises that science background is essential as she needs to understand the scientific context in order to effectively provide equipment and supplies as well as communicate effectively with researchers.

Her work is varied and requires very close attention to detail with lots of opportunity for project management. The skills of a researcher in managing, communicating and understanding data, problem solving, analysis, time management and being flexible and adaptable all come frequently into play. There are frequent opportunities to interact with the research the researchers and this kind of role can be great for those who don’t want to lose touch with science but do want to try a different profession.

The environment is often more formal than academic research. There are regular office hours and the culture is often more like that of a business than a university.

For those interested in applying for professional support roles within science, Nora recommends that you try to get some experience of and contact with people working in these roles and show your interest and willingness to get involved.

CVs and applications should be skills focussed and much less detailed than academic CVs as well as thoroughly tailored towards the role and institution you are applying for.

How to be well informed about working in life science

I want to work in the life science industry: How do I become more commercially aware?

As a PhD student or postdoctoral researcher, you may be considering a job in the life science industry. Without any previous industry experience, it can be an uphill struggle to show that you understand the sector, how it works, and how they make their money. This knowledge is known as commercial awareness and can take some time to develop. Often, it is developed once you are in a sector, as you become familiar with how the organisation works.  However, many employers want you to illustrate that you have commercial awareness on your CV and in an interview. It is therefore worth doing some research and trying to gain a little more expertise in this area. It will make a big difference to your chances of securing an industry job.

Here are four tips on how to do this:

 Hang out where industry people hang out!

Membership organisations such as OBN, OBR and OneNucleus often organise networking events where you can learn about current trends in life science and meet people from industry. Go along to an event, update your knowledge of the sector and speak to people about their jobs. It sounds obvious but networking within academic circles will not improve your understanding of how industry works.

Understand the sector

The life science sector has undergone a lot of changes over the last 20 years, with new business models evolving. Do your research to understand what is happening e.g. new business models now means that research and development happens within a range of organisations such as biopharmaceutical companies, medical technology companies, contract research organisations and not for profits.

Begin your research by reading online publications and following relevant people and organisations on Twitter e.g. The Government Office for Life Science. The following articles also give an overview of the life science sector in both the UK and globally, respectively:

Enter life science business competitions

There are several competitions that can help scientists learn about the commercialisation of research, which is an important part of developing commercial awareness. Try to enter such competitions as they often provide some training as well as exposure to industry experts.

 Get some work experience

This is difficult to achieve whilst continuing to do your research. You are already in a full-time job, after all! Some researchers take annual leave and some work at the weekends to broaden their expertise.  If potential work experience will benefit your current research or your PI, it might be possible to organise some time away from the laboratory.

Here are a few ideas for gaining work experience that will improve your commercial awareness:

  • Look out for part-time work opportunities doing consultancy work. These are sometimes posted on the Kings College London Graduate School Blog. Also look at the OBR website or Freshminds for occasional consultancy opportunities.
  • Sign up to the Kings Research Consultancy where you have the chance to work with an external organisation on a topic that relates to your research.
  • Look out for part-time work opportunities or project based work that can be done alongside your research. Look at Kings JobOnline for such opportunities and look for roles that have a business or commercial focus.
  • Keep up to date with business issues that relate to King’s researchers, by subscribing to and reading the Kings College London Graduate School Blog. Search in the ‘Business’ category on the right-hand side.

Many thanks to Dr. Tracy Bussoli for this guest blog. Find more about Tracy here.

Meaningful, paid teaching experience at this year’s K+ Spotlight Summer School

An exciting, developmental and paid opportunity is being offered to King’s doctoral and post-doctoral researchers to join in the collaboration between The Brilliant Club and the K+ programme, which is King’s College London’s flagship widening participation initiative.

The Brilliant Club is recruiting King’s College London doctoral and post-doctoral researchers to deliver the academic strand of the K+ Spotlight Summer School, an annual highlight in the K+ Programme. You will receive training from qualified teachers, and then design and deliver a series of five tutorials based on your own research to small groups of sixth form pupils over the course of a week.

K+ 2017

Those who are conducting research within the following areas are of particular interest: Healthcare, Dentistry, Maths, Computer Science, Politics, History, English Language and Literature.

If you have any questions, feel free to get in touch with Charlie at charlotte.talbotrice@thebrilliantclub.org.

 

‘Thriving, not surviving’ – King’s Community Lecture Series

New initiative open to both staff and students on the importance of well-being

Thriving not surviving

 

Date: Friday, 31 March 2017
Time: 18:30 – 19:30, plus a drinks reception in Chapters after the lecture
Location: Edmond J Safra Lecture Theatre, Strand campus

 

 

The King’s ‘Thriving, not surviving’ lecture series is a new initiative which aims to highlight the importance of your own well-being and to help you thrive in doing whatever it is you do!

The first lecture is all about the importance of managing your energy and how a few simple changes can help lower stress, increase your happiness and enhance your overall wellbeing.

Please visit the Eventbrite page to book a ticket, and to learn more about the ‘Thriving, not surviving’ lecture series, visit the intranet page.

 

Finding a job in life sciences

The prospect of securing a job in industry can seem daunting. The process can be nuanced and non-linear, full of barriers and setbacks. Before embarking upon the journey, be prepared for some rejection and try to accept that it might take some time!

Over the last eight years, I have watched a considerable number of researchers secure roles in industry. Here are some tips, based on my observations.

 Explore all industry sectors and roles

Look at the range of functions and roles within pharmaceuticals, biotechnology companies and contract research organisations. See below for a list of organisations:

Research and development is the typical area that attracts PhDs and postdocs; within this falls drug discovery, preclinical, clinical research and process development. Drug discovery and preclinical research jobs are typical jobs for PhDs and postdocs; job titles within this area usually contain the word ‘scientist.’

Other roles include business development managers, regulatory affairs specialists, medical scientific liaison (MSL) specialists, medical writers and life science consultants/analysts. Search for roles using a variety of terms and then read the job descriptions to see if you fulfil the criteria.

 Let everyone know that you are looking for work

It is easy to keep talking to other PhD students, postdocs and academics about job opportunities but this is not going to work if you want to find a job in industry! It is vital, and common practice, to let people outside your network know you are looking for a job.

Sign up to two or three specialist recruitment companies and go in with your eyes open! Many life science companies use recruiters, especially if they want to advertise roles without people knowing they are recruiting/relocating staff. Use the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) members list to find reputable companies. The University of Kent also has a list of science recruitment agencies on their website.

Set up a LinkedIn account and write your profile in a way that will attract industry professionals and recruiters. Emphasise your area of expertise, your research techniques and soft skills such as time management and leadership skills. Illustrate your skills with evidence such as supervising undergraduates or PhD students if you are demonstrating leadership.

Know what is happening in the pharmaceutical and biotech sector

It is easier to have conversations with people if you know what’s happening in their sector. It provides you with topics of conversation and demonstrates that you are serious about making a transition into industry. Start developing what employers refer to as commercial awareness. Look at industry blogs such as The Guardian’s Pharmaceuticals Industry or the the BBSRC’s Business Magazine to stay informed about ‘all things industry.’  You can also follow relevant Twitter feeds such as @BiotechNews and @Biotechnology. Deloitte also recently published a comprehensive article on the life science industry called 2016 Global Life Sciences Outlook. Worth a read before talking to industry people.

 Meet people from industry

It is crucial to get out and meet people from the sectors in which you would like to work. This can be an overwhelming thought for ‘more introverted’ scientists. Try to develop a curious outlook, asking intelligent questions and finding out about people’s work. Approach networking in the way you approach science, making your research topic people and their careers! Be curious, listen and think about how your work and experience might fit with the work that people are doing. When you first start networking, try not to feel the pressure of trying to impress – listening and being curious can go a long way.

One way to begin networking is to set up some information interviews. This is a one-to-one meeting with someone who has a role or career in which you are interested. It’s a chance for you to ask questions, gather information, learn about job options and career paths, and ask people for help to identify opportunities in their fields. Start off by approaching ‘warm’ contacts i.e. people that you know first or second hand or people you have something in common with such as PhD/postdoc alumni from Kings. Look at the LinkedIn pages of postdocs in your group to see if they know people that have moved into industry or ask your supervisor for their contacts, if appropriate. Then approach contacts on LinkedIn or by email and ask for 15 minutes of their time to have a chat about their role and company. Book an appointment with the PhD/postdoc Careers Consultant if you need some support with this as it can be tricky if you have not used this approach before.

Look out for events that may bring you into contact with potential employers e.g. One Nucleus and OBN host various seminars, events and training for people working in the life science sector. FirstMedCommsJob.com also run networking events for people wanting to work in medical communications. YES (Young Entrepreneurs Scheme) competitions, in a range of disciplines, can give you the opportunity to gain business mentoring, meet industry experts and develop commercial awareness.

Dr. Tracy Bussoli, Freelance Careers Consultant

Advancing Innovation in Health

Tuesday, 28th February, 5.30 – 8.30pm
Lecture Theatre 1, New Hunt’s House, Guy’s campus

Keynote speaker: Sir Bruce Keogh KBE, Medical Director, NHS England
Hosted by Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice Principal (Health), King’s

King’s College Entrepreneurship Institute and King’s health societies have put together a unique opportunity for you to hear from key opinion leaders in the entrepreneurial world. The event is free and open to all at KCL.

This special event offers you the opportunity to:

  • Vote on the challenges faced by the health industry you feel most passionately about, and learn about the important role innovation and entrepreneurship play in tackling them.
  • Meet our 4 x 4 showcase – Four King’s health innovators, Pankaj Chandak, Project Medicine, Cydar Ltd and QUiPP app who have just four minutes to share their amazing experiences with you – and get you hooked!
  • Speak to leading exhibitors including DigitalHealth.London, King’s Commercialisation Institute and the King’s20 accelerator, followed by a drinks and canapés networking reception.
  • Contribute to your personal learning. You will be emailed a Certificate of Engagement after the event signed by Professor Lechler and Julie Devonshire OBE, Director of the Entrepreneurship Institute.

There will be a reception with free food and drinks, plus the opportunity to build your professional networks and develop contacts that may be beneficial for the next step in your career.

For full details and to register for your place, click here.

Professional Futures: Internationalising your PhD, 18th January 2017

Charles Laing is a Research Scientist at DLR – the German Aerospace Centre. He specialises in space physiology, cardiovascular physiology and spaceflight countermeasures. He undertook his PhD in Space Medicine at King’s College London and began working internationally in 2012. Charles will provide his insights into working internationally and about how his research is understood and valued in different contexts.

Charlie spoke about:

  • The different work cultures in the UK and Germany. In Germany everyone is very business focussed and will expect quick, clear and definite responses to issues. Saying you think you can deliver on a project will make your German colleagues wonder if you can, whereas in the UK this would be a clear commitment to doing so.
  • Finding international opportunities to continue your research can be done through networking, placements and conferences. Charlie was on placement in Germany as part of his M.A. and this helped him create the necessary links.
  • The approach to research at DLR (the German aerospace agency) is very different to pure academic research on a PhD, being much more like a regular job with fixed hours and projects.
  • DLR is huge – over 7000 people on one campus – but has very little profile in the UK. Charlie recommended researching organisations in your field as you might be surprised at the level of activity and opportunity.
  • Having publications helped Charlie secure his role in Germany as these are compulsory in the German research system to gain a research job.
  • A PhD is much more respected in Germany than in the UK. Germany can also be much more formal – it’s unusual to address a Professor by first name until you are well acquainted.
  • The chance to gain skills beyond research – Charlie said he learned a great deal about budgeting and budget management that he wouldn’t have had in an academic lab in the UK.
  • The chance to learn the perspectives of other cultures as well (in his case) learn German from scratch.
  • Funding systems for research can be very different abroad and are worth researching.
  • Research in Germany is growing rapidly, thanks to their government investment and there should be many opportunities available for those who are suitably qualified.