Reducing risks in urban centres: think ‘local, local, local’

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Most urban centres in sub-Saharan Africa and many in Asia and Latin America are dangerous places to live and work. This can be seen in aggregate statistics for nations' urban populations that show (for instance) high infant, child and maternal mortality rates.

The dangers particularly affect low-income populations living in informal settlements. These areas often lack most risk-reducing infrastructure (such as safe, sufficient, accessible and affordable water; good-quality sanitation and electricity; all-weather roads; and street lighting) and risk-reducing services (including healthcare, waste collection, emergency services and policing).

But when basic provisions for these are in place, urban centres can be among the world's least dangerous places to live – shown by very high life expectancies.

Local government responsibility

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) mention addressing these risks and 'leaving no one behind'.  But they don't acknowledge that the responsibility largely falls to local governments, and that most risk in urban areas cannot be reduced when local governments fail their responsibilities.

These failures, and their causes, including inadequate support from higher levels of government and international agencies, are the most important reasons so many urban centres are so dangerous.  

In high-income and some upper-middle income countries, urban governments have dramatically reduced most of the life- and health-threatening risks by providing infrastructure and services, but also by managing land-use. This is important for making serviced land for housing available and affordable, for protecting watersheds, and for avoiding settlements on dangerous sites.  
 
In most cases, this has required well-functioning city governments and strong civil society pressure, including demands from organisations representing the urban poor.

There is little comparable progress in low- and many middle-income countries. Indeed, many have gone backwards: the proportion of their urban population lacking sanitation and piped water at home is lower today than it was in 1990 (PDF).

Data and local action

Cities in high-income countries also have information on risk: through censuses, vital registration systems, surveys, hospital records and data on air pollution. Reporting on road accidents, for example, has often led to concerted action. Similarly, understanding the health impacts of small particles has led to more stringent air pollution controls.

Reducing risk depends on local knowledge to identify and understand risk, and then local capacity to respond. Where conventional responses are too expensive or beyond local government capacities, communities are important.  

There are many examples of household and community-level action on risks. For instance, communities have led on installing sewers and drains (PDF) in many informal settlements in Karachi and other urban centres in Pakistan, and Mumbai's informal settlements have hundreds of community-designed and managed toilets and washing facilities (PDF).  

But community organisations cannot build the city-wide systems – the water mains, trunk sewers and drains, waste disposal, public transport, and so on. What was important in both these examples was community organisations working with government agencies and within local resource constraints.

When there is no local risk data

Where formal information systems don't exist, or where good information cannot be obtained from them, then new locally-rooted data collection is needed.  

Applying the DesInventar methodology to cities shows up many local risks that usually go unrecorded. This draws on local sources, such as newspaper reports, and includes events where people died or lost property but where too few were affected for a disaster to be recorded.

But it also faces limitations – for instance there are no records on most premature deaths from infectious and parasitic diseases on which it can draw.  

What too often gets forgotten is local people's knowledge and capacities. These can be accessed through household surveys, site visits, discussions with community organisations (PDF), and focus groups and interviews with key individuals (including local government staff and community leaders).

This is the third of three blogs drawn from the editorial in the April 2017 issue of the international journal, Environment & Urbanization. This issue is on 'Understanding the full spectrum of risk in urban areas' and it was prepared in partnership with Urban Africa Risk Knowledge (Urban ARK). The first blog was on 'Urban risks: where are the top five biggest blinds spots?' and the second was on 'Addressing the needs of vulnerable groups in urban areas'. 

Police, emergency services and hospitals also hold records on some risks. Then there are the detailed surveys and maps undertaken in hundreds of cities by slum/shack dweller federations. These provide much of the data needed to inform risk reduction and engage local populations in setting priorities. 

Functioning local democracies are another route to local knowledge on risks as they make local governments respond to demands by those who lack risk-reducing infrastructure and services, and this serves as a substitute for spatial data on risk.

Research programmes can help too. Urban ARK is a three-year programme of research and capacity building led by 12 policy and academic organisations from across sub-Saharan Africa, with partnerships in the United Kingdom. It aims to identify the most serious risks and break cycles that make risks accumulate.

The work is concentrated in four core cities – each presenting different development and hazard contexts: Ibadan (Nigeria), Karonga (Malawi), Nairobi (Kenya), and Niamey (Niger). Additional research is under way in Freetown (Sierra Leone), Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Mombasa (Kenya), Dakar (Senegal), and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia).

International support for local action

International agencies must recognise they need to support local action by local governments, local universities and local civil society organisations. There is much they can do.

These agencies can help local groups access data from government agencies at all levels. They can pressurise national statistical offices and census bureaus to serve and support local governments and other local groups by providing useful data.

International agencies can also learn to support 'co-production' between local governments and groups at risk. But perhaps most important of all, international agencies must develop a capacity to help fund and support a range of initiatives in each locality, including civil society initiatives.

In short, the focus needs to be unrelentingly 'local, local, local', as agencies assess the most serious everyday risks, as well as the small and large disaster risks facing each settlement, and act on these.

Standfirst: 

Urban centres can be among the world's most healthy places to live and work – but many are among the least. How healthy they are is powerfully influenced by local government competence, local information, and support for local action.

 

 

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Urban ARK at Habitat III

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Urban ARK at Habitat III The Habitat III global summit is well underway in Quito with many critical themes and issues already emerging. At this four-day international gathering, nation states are expected to agree on the New Urban Agenda, which will outline a global strategy on sustainable urban development for the next two decades. This is a critical moment for urban disaster risk and development agendas. Many challenging issues require further attention, not least for the agenda to respond to Debra Roberts recent critical reflections and messages shared during her IIED Barbara Ward lecture (11 October 2016), speaking ahead of Habitat III: “Global policy makers don’t make revolutions, local people do” and “there is no call to action in the draft New Urban Agenda”. Debra is Head of the Sustainable City Initiatives portfolio in eThekwini Municipality, Durban, South Africa. co-chair of Working Group II for the IPCC's sixth assessment cycle and Urban ARK Impact Reviewer. Debra also commented on the centrality of activism for urban change and the role of every city dweller in taking up that position. Urban ARK is hosting and participating in several sessions with representation from consortium members: David Satterthwaite and David Dodman (IIED), Cassidy Johnson, Emmanuel Osuteye and Adriana Allen (UCL), Katharina Rochell and Matthias Spaliviero (UN Habitat) as well as collaborators Joe Mulligan (Kounkey Design Initiative) and Shona Patterson (Future Earth Coasts) and Urban ARK Advisory Board Member Shuaib Lwasa (Makere University).  Urban ARK related sessions are as follows:

  • The Power of Participatory Resilience Planning in Fast Growing Urban Settlements: Experiences from Africa, 17th Oct, 1130-1330 One Pavilion Room A, Contact: Mathias Spaliviero
  • Reducing Relocation Risk in Urban Areas, 17th Oct 1100–1200, Room MR8, Casa de la Cultura Ecuatoriana "Benjamin Carrion". Contact: C. Johnson
  • Providing safe, inclusive and accessible public spaces in the cities of the emerging economies, 17th Oct, 1330-1430, Contact: Joe Mulligan
  • Environment and Urbanization Reception, 18th Oct 1800–2130, Mercure Hotel, Vicente Ramón Roca E4-122 y Avenida Rio Amazonas, Contact: D.Satterthwaite
  • Disrupting urban risk traps: Towards just urban resilience, 20th Oct0930-1230, Room: Campus of Sustainable Cities, Auditorium. Contact: A. Allen        
  • Climate change & urban disaster resilience, tbc, Room: UN Pavillion. Contact: D. Satterthwaite

Consortium members have been sharing insights and lessons from the first few day’s sessions on Twitter and other platforms. David Satterthwaite and David Dodman have emphasised the significant role being played by representatives from Shum/Shack Dwellers International (SDI) at the conference through highlighting the critical role of local communities in the New Urban Agenda and bringing their 'reality checks, priorities and solutions to the fore'. Local actors in risk management – local government, community groups and those at risk are central stakeholders in Urban ARK’s programme of activities. UCL colleagues listed above have also participated in lively discussions around understanding risks associated with resettlements and internal displacements in cities, emphasising the imperative for avoiding forced evictions and the importance of multi-stakeholder deliberative processes.  Urban ARK will be following the event closely and reflecting on key lessons, gaps and opportunities for the way forward. Please join our remaining sessions – we would love to learn from shared insights. 

Posted in Uncategorized

Urban ARK at Habitat III

Undefined

Urban ARK at Habitat III The Habitat III global summit is well underway in Quito with many critical themes and issues already emerging. At this four-day international gathering, nation states are expected to agree on the New Urban Agenda, which will outline a global strategy on sustainable urban development for the next two decades. This is a critical moment for urban disaster risk and development agendas. Many challenging issues require further attention, not least for the agenda to respond to Debra Roberts recent critical reflections and messages shared during her IIED Barbara Ward lecture (11 October 2016), speaking ahead of Habitat III: “Global policy makers don’t make revolutions, local people do” and “there is no call to action in the draft New Urban Agenda”. Debra is Head of the Sustainable City Initiatives portfolio in eThekwini Municipality, Durban, South Africa. co-chair of Working Group II for the IPCC's sixth assessment cycle and Urban ARK Impact Reviewer. Debra also commented on the centrality of activism for urban change and the role of every city dweller in taking up that position. Urban ARK is hosting and participating in several sessions with representation from consortium members: David Satterthwaite and David Dodman (IIED), Cassidy Johnson, Emmanuel Osuteye and Adriana Allen (UCL), Katharina Rochell and Matthias Spaliviero (UN Habitat) as well as collaborators Joe Mulligan (Kounkey Design Initiative) and Shona Patterson (Future Earth Coasts) and Urban ARK Advisory Board Member Shuaib Lwasa (Makere University).  Urban ARK related sessions are as follows:

  • The Power of Participatory Resilience Planning in Fast Growing Urban Settlements: Experiences from Africa, 17th Oct, 1130-1330 One Pavilion Room A, Contact: Mathias Spaliviero
  • Reducing Relocation Risk in Urban Areas, 17th Oct 1100–1200, Room MR8, Casa de la Cultura Ecuatoriana "Benjamin Carrion". Contact: C. Johnson
  • Providing safe, inclusive and accessible public spaces in the cities of the emerging economies, 17th Oct, 1330-1430, Contact: Joe Mulligan
  • Environment and Urbanization Reception, 18th Oct 1800–2130, Mercure Hotel, Vicente Ramón Roca E4-122 y Avenida Rio Amazonas, Contact: D.Satterthwaite
  • Disrupting urban risk traps: Towards just urban resilience, 20th Oct0930-1230, Room: Campus of Sustainable Cities, Auditorium. Contact: A. Allen        
  • Climate change & urban disaster resilience, tbc, Room: UN Pavillion. Contact: D. Satterthwaite

Consortium members have been sharing insights and lessons from the first few day’s sessions on Twitter and other platforms. David Satterthwaite and David Dodman have emphasised the significant role being played by representatives from Shum/Shack Dwellers International (SDI) at the conference through highlighting the critical role of local communities in the New Urban Agenda and bringing their 'reality checks, priorities and solutions to the fore'. Local actors in risk management – local government, community groups and those at risk are central stakeholders in Urban ARK’s programme of activities. UCL colleagues listed above have also participated in lively discussions around understanding risks associated with resettlements and internal displacements in cities, emphasising the imperative for avoiding forced evictions and the importance of multi-stakeholder deliberative processes.  Urban ARK will be following the event closely and reflecting on key lessons, gaps and opportunities for the way forward. Please join our remaining sessions – we would love to learn from shared insights. 

Posted in Uncategorized

Urban ARK at Habitat III

Undefined

Urban ARK at Habitat III The Habitat III global summit is well underway in Quito with many critical themes and issues already emerging. At this four-day international gathering, nation states are expected to agree on the New Urban Agenda, which will outline a global strategy on sustainable urban development for the next two decades. This is a critical moment for urban disaster risk and development agendas. Many challenging issues require further attention, not least for the agenda to respond to Debra Roberts recent critical reflections and messages shared during her IIED Barbara Ward lecture (11 October 2016), speaking ahead of Habitat III: “Global policy makers don’t make revolutions, local people do” and “there is no call to action in the draft New Urban Agenda”. Debra is Head of the Sustainable City Initiatives portfolio in eThekwini Municipality, Durban, South Africa. co-chair of Working Group II for the IPCC's sixth assessment cycle and Urban ARK Impact Reviewer. Debra also commented on the centrality of activism for urban change and the role of every city dweller in taking up that position. Urban ARK is hosting and participating in several sessions with representation from consortium members: David Satterthwaite and David Dodman (IIED), Cassidy Johnson, Emmanuel Osuteye and Adriana Allen (UCL), Katharina Rochell and Matthias Spaliviero (UN Habitat) as well as collaborators Joe Mulligan (Kounkey Design Initiative) and Shona Patterson (Future Earth Coasts) and Urban ARK Advisory Board Member Shuaib Lwasa (Makere University).  Urban ARK related sessions are as follows:

  • The Power of Participatory Resilience Planning in Fast Growing Urban Settlements: Experiences from Africa, 17th Oct, 1130-1330 One Pavilion Room A, Contact: Mathias Spaliviero
  • Reducing Relocation Risk in Urban Areas, 17th Oct 1100–1200, Room MR8, Casa de la Cultura Ecuatoriana "Benjamin Carrion". Contact: C. Johnson
  • Providing safe, inclusive and accessible public spaces in the cities of the emerging economies, 17th Oct, 1330-1430, Contact: Joe Mulligan
  • Environment and Urbanization Reception, 18th Oct 1800–2130, Mercure Hotel, Vicente Ramón Roca E4-122 y Avenida Rio Amazonas, Contact: D.Satterthwaite
  • Disrupting urban risk traps: Towards just urban resilience, 20th Oct0930-1230, Room: Campus of Sustainable Cities, Auditorium. Contact: A. Allen        
  • Climate change & urban disaster resilience, tbc, Room: UN Pavillion. Contact: D. Satterthwaite

Consortium members have been sharing insights and lessons from the first few day’s sessions on Twitter and other platforms. David Satterthwaite and David Dodman have emphasised the significant role being played by representatives from Shum/Shack Dwellers International (SDI) at the conference through highlighting the critical role of local communities in the New Urban Agenda and bringing their 'reality checks, priorities and solutions to the fore'. Local actors in risk management – local government, community groups and those at risk are central stakeholders in Urban ARK’s programme of activities. UCL colleagues listed above have also participated in lively discussions around understanding risks associated with resettlements and internal displacements in cities, emphasising the imperative for avoiding forced evictions and the importance of multi-stakeholder deliberative processes.  Urban ARK will be following the event closely and reflecting on key lessons, gaps and opportunities for the way forward. Please join our remaining sessions – we would love to learn from shared insights. 

Posted in Uncategorized

Urban ARK: stakeholder engagement and collaboration

English
Urban ARK in the Media - Ibadan, The Nation Newspaper, 12.11.15

The Urban Africa Risk Knowledge (Urban ARK) programme is developing rapidly with city teams currently in final stages of preparation for fieldwork to be undertaken in each of the 6 case study sites in sub-Sarahan Africa including Niamey (Niger), Dakar (Senagal), Nairobi and Mombasa (Kenya), Karonga (Malawi) and Ibadan (Nigeria). Urban ARK aims to describe the changing nature, scale and distribution of risk as a basis for projecting and anticipating future changes in risk so that city governments – and the local communities and civil society organisations they do or could work with – can more effectively reduce risk and manage uncertainty to build resilience.

The consortia are committed to collaborative research and learning across the programme. Capacity building and long term development and policy impact are core concerns of the programme. As such, stakeholder engagement has been a major feature of the first year of the programme with a focus on awareness and partnership building amongst policy actors. Stakeholder meetings have been held in all key case study cities and have been led by city teams with participation of city researchers, risk planners and urban policy leaders. The integration of local stakeholders early on and throughout the project life cycle facilitates a clear communication strategy and this helps build a common language across the programme and ensures local priorities are captured and addressed.

Media attention around Urban ARK is growing and is important for reaching wide audiences and communicating important messages about urban disaster risk and its reduction. Recent stakeholder meetings in Ibadan http://tribuneonlineng.com/stakeholders-renew-fight-against-urban-hazards; http://newsexpressngr.com/news/detail.php?news=17307&title=DFID,-others-fund-3.3m-pounds-urban-risks-study-of-Ibadan-City and Karonga (http://mwnation.com/mzuni-puts-karonga-disasters-under-study/) have received press coverage (see also the blog caption article published in The Nation, Ibadan, 12/11/2015).

Two further major stakeholder meetings are planned for February 2016 in Lilongwe and Nairobi. These meetings will introduce Urban ARK to stakeholders working in the regions and representing international agencies based in the regions, provide an opportunity for stakeholders to comment on planned work and help shape activities in the city and region to build a reference group of stakeholders who can be kept informed of Urban ARK opportunities and activities throughout the programme cycle.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Urban ARK: stakeholder engagement and collaboration

English
Urban ARK in the Media - Ibadan, The Nation Newspaper, 12.11.15

The Urban Africa Risk Knowledge (Urban ARK) programme is developing rapidly with city teams currently in final stages of preparation for fieldwork to be undertaken in each of the 6 case study sites in sub-Sarahan Africa including Niamey (Niger), Dakar (Senagal), Nairobi and Mombasa (Kenya), Karonga (Malawi) and Ibadan (Nigeria). Urban ARK aims to describe the changing nature, scale and distribution of risk as a basis for projecting and anticipating future changes in risk so that city governments – and the local communities and civil society organisations they do or could work with – can more effectively reduce risk and manage uncertainty to build resilience.

The consortia are committed to collaborative research and learning across the programme. Capacity building and long term development and policy impact are core concerns of the programme. As such, stakeholder engagement has been a major feature of the first year of the programme with a focus on awareness and partnership building amongst policy actors. Stakeholder meetings have been held in all key case study cities and have been led by city teams with participation of city researchers, risk planners and urban policy leaders. The integration of local stakeholders early on and throughout the project life cycle facilitates a clear communication strategy and this helps build a common language across the programme and ensures local priorities are captured and addressed.

Media attention around Urban ARK is growing and is important for reaching wide audiences and communicating important messages about urban disaster risk and its reduction. Recent stakeholder meetings in Ibadan http://tribuneonlineng.com/stakeholders-renew-fight-against-urban-hazards; http://newsexpressngr.com/news/detail.php?news=17307&title=DFID,-others-fund-3.3m-pounds-urban-risks-study-of-Ibadan-City and Karonga (http://mwnation.com/mzuni-puts-karonga-disasters-under-study/) have received press coverage (see also the blog caption article published in The Nation, Ibadan, 12/11/2015).

Two further major stakeholder meetings are planned for February 2016 in Lilongwe and Nairobi. These meetings will introduce Urban ARK to stakeholders working in the regions and representing international agencies based in the regions, provide an opportunity for stakeholders to comment on planned work and help shape activities in the city and region to build a reference group of stakeholders who can be kept informed of Urban ARK opportunities and activities throughout the programme cycle.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized