International Women’s day event at Worcester University

internat womens day

International Women’s Day: ‘The resilience of women within the refugee crisis’

Wednesday, 08 March 2017

International Women’s Day on 8th March 2017 celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women across the world and makes a call to action to gender parity.  We can all be a leader within our own lives to influence and take action to accelerate the collective advancement of women. Join the University of Worcester to #BeBoldForChange.

Worcester University are presenting an array of academic, practitioner and individual perspectives on 8th March, celebrating the resilience, the courage and the strength of women refugees who flee their homes with their families to safety. Their IWD2017 theme is the resilience of displaced women. Cost: £25

For more information, please proceed to the booking form found here 

 

 

Successful Learning Alliance meeting at Worcester University

dani presentdiscuss la feb

The West Midlands ADVANCE team were excited last week to bring together key organisations and academics from the field of IPV and substance misuse to discuss the ADVANCE project. The Learning Alliance will work together to strengthen and support the exchange of information, whilst enhancing the possibilities of mainstreaming the integration of domestic abuse interventions with substance use services.

Members of the West Midlands Learning Alliance included the following organisations: Swanswell, Public Health England, West Midlands Violence Prevention Alliance, West Midlands Police, Richmond Fellowship, West Mercia Rape & Sexual Abuse Support Centre, Police and Crime Commissioner, West Mercia, Anawim, West Mercia Women’s Aid, South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Aquarius, Worcester County Council, Safe & Sound Malvern Hills and Cranston.

The Worcester Research Team introduced the ADVANCE project in-depth, and explained the projects goals and workstreams. Representatives discussed their thoughts on the research plans and highlighted best practice surrounding safety when recruiting survivors of IPV into research. Representatives discussed language used to recruit survivors and safety protocols that should be implemented for both the participants and researchers taking part.

Overall, feedback from the first meeting was very positive with representatives expressing how nice it was to be able to share experiences of the challenging nature when working with substance users + IPV perpetrators with similar organisations.

The next meeting will be in June. If you would like more information on the Learning Alliance or would like to attend the next Learning Alliance meeting then please contact Amy Johnson on a.johnson@worc.ac.uk.

 

 

 

 

Paper published on controlling behaviours linked to UK policy

The UK government has now included controlling behaviour and coercive control as offences in its Violence against Women and Girls Strategy VAWG.

Within controlling behaviours, Technology Facilitated Abuse (TFA) is also thought to be widespread with mobile technologies providing a means for perpetrators to easily and repeatedly control, harass, stalk and intimidate partners from a distance.

alc review spec issue

This paper provides evidence of controlling behaviours and TFA amongst men attending substance use treatment in England and Brazil. In secondary analysis of two cross sectionals studies, a significant proportion of men receiving treatment for substance use reported perpetrating controlling behaviours (64% in England and 65% in Brazil) and TFA (33% in England and 20% in Brazil) towards their current/most recent partner. The paper argues that further research is needed to consider the extent to which substance use intoxication and related behaviours (craving, purchasing and sharing substances) may make controlling behaviours more likely amongst substance users and that controlling behaviours and TFA should be included in interventions to address IPV perpetration in this population.

You can download this paper here

 

 

A framework for working safely and effectively with men who perpetrate IPV in substance use treatment settings

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The Framework for working safely and effectively with men who perpetrate intimate partner violence in substance use treatment settings was developed from the findings of the bilateral project ‘Perpetration of intimate partner violence by males in substance abuse treatment: a cross-cultural research Learning Alliance’ (funded by the Economic and Social Research Council ES/K002589/1)

The Framework is aimed primarily at people who work within substance use treatment services to define and clarify the key capabilities (i.e. knowledge, attitude and values, ethical practice, skills and reflection and professional development) for working with men who use substances (drugs and alcohol), and who perpetrate intimate partner violence.

The first part gives an overview of the rationale for the development of the framework, including background information on intimate partner violence perpetration by people who receive substance use services. The second part describes the capabilities themselves. The final part contains useful resources including user friendly self-assessment and team checklist designed to allow a service to rapidly implement and benefit from the framework.

Here is the link to download the framework, click ‘capabilities framework’.

 

 

 

Learning Alliance launch meeting in London

LA attendeesGail side 3Polly presents la

The first London Learning Alliance for the ADVANCE project took place this week at Kings College London. The Learning Alliance will work together to address this issue across sectors by supporting the exchange of information and good practice. Members of the London Learning Alliance include drug and alcohol treatment services, domestic violence survivor and perpetrator organisations, the Department of Health, the Home Office, Public Health England and local authorities.

Gail Gilchrist and Polly Radcliffe described the project goals and work streams. Participants were asked to comment on the research plans and to highlight best practice surrounding safety when recruiting survivors of IPV into research. Attendees suggested strategies when contacting IPV survivors and how to work with partners and perpetrators simultaneously.

Attendees shared what they hoped to gain from attending the learning alliance more broadly. Common themes included sharing experience on the challenges of working with substance using IPV perpetrators. Attendees were invited to promote their activities, reports or events through this blog. The next meeting will take place in June.

If you are interested in attending our Learning Alliance meetings please contact Juliet.henderson@kcl.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

New report on outcomes of perpetrator programmes

DVIP report front cover

The Domestic Violence Intervention Project (DVIP)  and Cranstoun has published a report detailing outcomes of working with 30 male perpetrators of domestic violence in a substance treatment context. The report documents what has been learnt from the pilot programme that assesses and treats a group of men disclosing behavioural concerns relating to substance us and DV.

DVIP and Cranstoun jointly developed a safety focussed, 60+ hours day programme designed to support the aims and objectives of a substance use treatment programme. It combines the two working styles by using emotionally challenging and more general self-talk and CBT material. The assessment process used to recruit men to the group showed the majority of men had used severe and persistent violence and abuse in their intimate relationships.

Outcomes

1. 87% of men started treatment  

2. 77% of men completed over 30 hours of DV prevention work

3. Men on the programme reduced their drug/alcohol use by 29% and reported a 40% improvement in their quality of life

4. The combined intervention did not impinge on the aims of the substance use treatment

5. Active contact was established with 53% of ex/partners

6. Only 1 woman disclosed an incidence of violence during the programme

7. 87% of men commenced treatment

8. 77% of men completed more than 30 hours of treatment

The report concluded:

The high proportion of men using persistent and severe violence and abuse in their relationships and the programme outcomes highlight the need for a combined intervention. The authors recommend that other domestic violence and substance misuse agencies bring together their skills and understanding to deliver joint substance misuse and domestic violence interventions. All joint work should be conducted alongside a partner support service and delivered by dedicated and experienced staff to allow for a comprehensive case and risk management process to take place alongside service delivery.

If you would like more details please contact Cranstoun on 0207 923 8010.

You can download the report here.

 

 

 

 

 

Justice secretary Liz Truss orders review to prevent abusers cross-examining partners in family courts

Truss photo

The Guardian on the 5th January reported that Liz Truss has set up an urgent review to ban perpetrators of domestic violence cross-examining their X partners in family courts. She argues this practice has permitted continued harassment and intimidation by abusers and needs to be prevented. Campaigners and legal representatives in the field have been calling for an end to this practice and highlighting that family courts are way behind criminal courts in this matter. An emergency paper has been proposed to introduce a swift ban to this type of cross-examination in family courts.

Please find the full article here.

Walking a mile in her shoes event – Worcester

walk a mile

Representatives from programme ADVANCE put their best pair of heels on and walked through Worcester city to raise awareness of domestic abuse. The event was welcomed by the local community with enthusiasm and encouragement for these events of awareness. ADVANCE representatives walked alongside 30 other people including firefighters, police officers, Worcester wolves and other lecturers and students. This is an annual event so anybody that is interested from the West Midlands Learning Alliance or if you have some free time and live in the area, we would love to see you there next year!! Please click here for a link to a local news article covering the event.

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Link between alcohol and other drugs and domestic violence – Professor Peter Miller

Deakin uni

New research has confirmed the link between alcohol and other drugs and domestic violence, showing heavy binge drinking doubles the risk of family or intimate partner violence. Lead researcher Professor Peter Miller, from Deakin’s School of Psychology, said alcohol related incidents were also more severe, and much more likely to involve physical violence, and result in physical, psychological, or emotional injury, than those where no alcohol was involved “Heavy drinking was also found to be associated with increased levels of coercive controlling behaviour, which includes emotional, psychological, and physical abuse of a partner,” Professor Miller said.

 
While drug use is only involved in a small minority of cases, it appears to be associated with increased likelihood of experiencing family or domestic violence. Overall, 10.5% of incidents were illicit drug-related. Illicit drug users were 2.8 times likely than non-users to report recent violence. Drug-related intimate partner violence incidents were also more severe.  The study, Alcohol/Drug-Involved Family Violence in Australia (ADIVA), was completed by researchers from Deakin’s School of Psychology and funded by the National Drug Law Enforcement Fund.You can read download the report here and there is an article discussing the implications of the findings here

 

 

European Evaluation of Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes

home_coverSarah-Jane Lilley-Walker, Marianne Hester and William Turner of the Centre for Gender and Violence Research at the University of Bristol have published an article in the International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology (IJOTCC) reviewing evaluations of European Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes has been published. Please find the article title and a summary of the paper below. You can download the paper here.

 

 

Evaluation of European Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes: Toward a Model for Designing and Reporting Evaluations Related to Perpetrator Treatment Interventions

Recognising the methodological challenges that have so far prevented us from fully understanding how domestic violence perpetrator programmes (DVPPs) might work to create positive change, it is essential to further investigate how such treatment interventions might contribute to the safety of women and children victims/survivors. Based on an extensive review of 60 evaluations of European domestic violence perpetrator programmes – conducted as part of the European Commission–funded project “IMPACT: Evaluation of European Perpetrator Programmes” (Daphne III Programme) which aimed to identify the possibilities of a harmonised multi-country evaluation of DVPPs – Lilley et al (2016) propose a model that should be used and promoted in this field of evaluation to facilitate more accurate and robust sample profiling in order to better understand who is participating and why; who is dropping out, when and why; who is completing; and who is actually changing; when, why, and how.